SINGAPORE’S WILDLIFE CELEBRATE NATIONAL DAY

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Singapore, 8 August 2013 – Animals from Singapore Zoo and Jurong Bird Park are showing off their patriotic side this 9 August, to commemorate Singapore’s 48th birthday. Join them as they celebrate national day.

Gambir, Singapore Zoo’s 24-year-old Asian elephant practices her flag-raising routine ahead of National Day. Catch her at the Elephants at Work and Play show on 9 August, at 11.30am and 3.30pm.

Gambir, Singapore Zoo’s 24-year-old Asian elephant practices her flag-raising routine
ahead of National Day. Catch her at the Elephants at Work and Play show on 9
August, at 11.30am and 3.30pm.

Andi, an 8-year-old California sea lion, proudly waves the Singapore flag. He and his sea lion counterpart will also balance the national flag and unveil a banner at the Splash Safari show to wish everyone a happy national day at Singapore Zoo. The Splash Safari show happens daily at 10.30am and 5pm.

Andi, an 8-year-old California sea lion, proudly waves the Singapore flag. He and his
sea lion counterpart will also balance the national flag and unveil a banner at the
Splash Safari show to wish everyone a happy national day at Singapore Zoo.
The Splash Safari show happens daily at 10.30am and 5pm.

Jurong Bird Park Highlights:
During this double celebration of Hari Raya and National Day, our feathered friends at Jurong Bird Park’s High Flyers Show are also joining in the festivities. On 8 August, Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo will fly in a mini ketupat to a volunteer, while the show presenter explains the significance of the ketupat with Hari Raya to guests.

From 9 – 11 August, Quincy the yellow-headed Amazon will serenade guests with his rendition of ‘Singapura,’ and Sassy will fly mini Singapore flags to two volunteers.

The High Flyers Show happens daily at 11am and 3pm.

ORIENTAL PIED HORNBILL WILD POPULATION GETS A BOOST WITH JURONG BIRD PARK’S RELEASE OF THREE BIRDS IN PULAU UBIN

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Release will add to the genetic pool of Oriental Pied Hornbills in the wild; bird unsighted in Singapore for over 140 years prior to 1994.

An Oriental Pied hornbill in Jurong Bird Park being measured from bill tip to rear bill intersection prior to a planned release for the purpose of increasing the genetic pool of the species’ wild population.

An Oriental Pied hornbill in Jurong Bird Park being measured from bill tip to rear bill intersection prior to a planned release for the purpose of increasing the genetic pool of the species’ wild population.

Singapore, 8 July 2013 – In an effort to diversify the genetic pool of wild hornbills in Singapore, Jurong Bird Park will release three Oriental Pied Hornbills from their collection to Pulau Ubin on 10 July.

“Increasing the genetic pool of Oriental Pied Hornbills or any other bird is important to the conservation of the species because it allows for a healthier population of these birds. With more genetic diversity, the species is less susceptible to diseases,” said Dr Minerva Bongco-Nuqui, Curator, Avian, Jurong Bird Park.

Jurong Bird Park is the first institution globally to successfully incubate and hatch Oriental Pied Hornbills. The park has one of the largest collections of hornbills globally, with 17 species represented.

Jurong Bird Park is the first institution globally to successfully incubate and hatch Oriental Pied Hornbills. The park has one of the largest collections of hornbills globally, with 17 species represented.

Earlier in March, the Bird Park became the first institution globally to successfully artificially incubate and hatch three Oriental pied hornbill eggs, which had been rescued from Pulau Ubin by officers from the National Parks Board (NParks). These three chicks have been absorbed into the Park’s collection. Retaining these three chicks enables the Park to increase the breeding genetic pool of the existing collection. Similarly, releasing three other birds to Pulau Ubin gives the wild population of Oriental Pied Hornbills greater diversity in the genetic pool.

The Oriental Pied Hornbills selected for release include a bonded pair which are captive bred and a male which was donated to the Park. In preparation for the release and to allow these birds to acclimatise, whole fruit found on the island have been introduced into their diet. These birds were also tested to be free from diseases before the release.

Ahead of the release, the Oriental Pied Hornbills have undergone a physical measurement and health check. Data like the microchip number, sex, age, body length and casque length were recorded and kept for conservation and research purposes. Conservationists can extrapolate from this data as a reference point and make inferences to the general overview of the population, to understand the group’s dynamics, leading to better management of the population.

On 10 July, the bonded pair and one male hornbill will set forth from Jurong Bird Park for Pulau Ubin to be released. They will join an estimated 60 Oriental Pied Hornbills on the offshore island. The release site was chosen as it is the same location from which three Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued in January this year.

“NParks has been working closely with Jurong Bird Park and the Singapore Avian Conservation Project team in hornbill conservation since 2004. Due to the concerted efforts of the parties involved, the population of Oriental Pied Hornbills in the wild has increased from a few individuals to about 100 hornbills all over Singapore. In addition to being a part of Singapore’s natural heritage, Oriental Pied Hornbills are also natural dispersers of seeds. As such, the birds reach various areas in Singapore, including remote forested areas in our nature reserves, re-populating the island with plants. This adds to the rich biodiversity of flora and fauna in our City in a Garden. Today, we are very excited with another step in our ex-situ conservation efforts and the release of three Oriental Pied Hornbills,” said Wong Tuan Wah, Director (Conservation), NParks.

The Oriental Pied Hornbill disappeared from Singapore in the mid-1800s, possibly due to hunting and loss of suitable habitats. In 1994, a pair was sighted on Pulau Ubin. Once virtually disappeared from Singapore, the bird is today re-establishing healthy colonies here, thanks to the collective efforts of the NParks, Jurong Bird Park, and Singapore Avian Conservation Project (SACP).

Jurong Bird Park has one of the largest collections of hornbills globally, with 17 species represented. The Park has 17 Oriental Pied Hornbills, some of which can be seen at the Hornbills & Toucans exhibit. During breeding season which takes place from November to March, cameras will be installed in the Oriental Pied Hornbill exhibit, and visitors can catch a glimpse of nesting activities through television screens placed at the exhibit.

JURONG BIRD PARK TAKES CURIOUS LITTLE MINDS ON A FLIGHT AROUND THE WORLD

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Enjoy 1-for-1 promotions and exciting educational activities from 24 May – 30 June

Singapore, 6 May 2013 – Nourish the imaginative and curious little minds of your child with a learning experience at Jurong Bird Park, where visitors will embark on a round-the-world journey during the June school holiday weekends with a myriad of egg-citing activities.

The fun starts with huge savings off ticket prices with Jurong Bird Park’s buy-1-get-1 free promotion on admission tickets. Flash the coupon found at the Park’s website at the ticketing counters to enjoy this promotion from 24 May to 30 June 2013. The free ticket must be of the same or of a lower value than the ticket purchased.

From 1 to 23 June 2013, there is no better time to take a flap and a flight out west to the Bird Park, to participate in six special programmes which have been exclusively tailored for children to go on an interactive and fun edu-taining journey.

  1. Dora and Diego: Join Dora and Diego from the well-known Nickelodeon cartoon series, Dora the Explorer and Go, Diego, Go!, as they take on Jurong Bird Park as their new destination for learning and discovery. There will be a chance for photo opportunities with Dora and Diego at the Pools Amphitheatre at 12.30pm during the weekends in June.
  2. Explorer of the 5 Continents: Let your child become an ‘Explorer of the 5 Continents’, and nurture their adventurous spirit! Every child will be handed a customised Jurong Bird Park kid’s explorer kit which contains a ‘passport’. With it, children can navigate around the park to collect stamps in their very own Jurong Bird Park explorer passport. Be sure to check in at the exhibits showcasing birds from Australia, South America, Antarctica, Asia and Africa to collect all 5 stamps!
  3. Dr Squawk’s Expedition: Meet Dr Squawk, the popular host of Bird Park Flies to Schools, who teaches children all about birds in an engaging and fun manner. Children between the ages of 5 to 12 years old can sign up for Dr. Squawk’s Expedition in the Bird Park, as she travels to different continents in search of her flightless feathery friends. This will be held at 2.30pm and 4.30pm at the Breeding and Research Centre. Pre-registration is required online, or at the venue at least 15 minutes prior to the start of the programme.
  4. Meet the Bird Stars: Seize the opportunity to get up close to Jurong Bird Park’s most eggxotic birds at a meet-and-greet session featuring unique-looking birds like Harriet the bar pouched wreathed hornbill and learn interesting facts about them at 1.45pm at Penguin Coast!
  5. Be a Junior Avian Keeper: Children who are deeply passionate about wildlife conservation should sign up for two specially organised immersive experiences to learn more about birds. The Junior Avian Keeper Programme for older children on 7 June aims to provide a hands-on experience with tasks such as preparing feed and enrichment for the birds.
  6. Holiday camps: Children between the ages of 6 to twelve can sign up with like-minded friends for the 3-Day Bird Quest Camp from 12 – 14 June, to embark on an expedition where they can experience up-close encounters with feathered friends, unearth the secrets of nest making and learn about how feathers help flight.

The fun does not stop here. After an exhilarating day, do not forget the wildlife conservation messages learnt at Jurong Bird Park. Visit the website and download fun and interactive games created by students from MAGES Institute of Excellence. This final year project by the students consists of 5 games which will be released over a period of 5 months. Through a series of challenges such as choosing the right types of food and working one’s way through a maze to free the birds, the games reinforce the importance of conservation and protection of wildlife. The first game – Born to Fly, which involves guiding a Bali Mynah through forestations while avoiding obstacles and predators – will be made available for download through the website in June, at http://education.birdpark.com.sg.

For more information on Jurong Bird Park, and the June holiday activities, please visit http://www.birdpark.com.sg.

Meet Dr Squawk, the popular host of Bird Park Flies to Schools, as she travels to different continents in search of her flightless feathery friends in Dr Squawk’s Expedition.

Meet Dr Squawk, the popular
host of Bird Park Flies to Schools, as she
travels to different continents in search of
her flightless feathery friends in Dr
Squawk’s Expedition.

Join Dora and Diego from the well-known Nickelodeon cartoon series, Dora the Explorer and Go, Diego, Go!, as they take on Jurong Bird Park as their new destination for learning and discovery.

Join Dora and Diego from the
well-known Nickelodeon cartoon series,
Dora the Explorer and Go, Diego, Go!, as
they take on Jurong Bird Park as their
new destination for learning and
discovery.

Activity Details

Activity Details

CELEBRATING EARTH DAY WITH A PENGUIN PLAY DATE AT JURONG BIRD PARK

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Themed ‘Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home’, primary school children and youths lead the charge to spread penguin conservation messages at the park.

Singapore, 20 April 2013 – With Earth Day and World Penguin Day falling just three days apart, Earth Day at Jurong Bird Park is particularly meaningful for a group of children and youths who have become conservation ambassadors with a determined focus on spreading the message of “Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home”, aimed at protecting penguins and other marine creatures.

Coming together for ‘A Penguin Play Date’, students from Greenridge Primary School (GRPS) and youth volunteers created two gigantic penguin art pieces made of recycled materials at Jurong Bird Park. These art pieces take the form of a 3-metre tall 2D silhouette, and a sliding penguin sculpture. In addition, 12 primary school children between the ages of 9-11 manned craft stations in the park to teach park visitors what they know about penguins and how to protect these birds by minimising waste.

GRPS students took a month to collect about 600 recycled bottles for the play date. The recycled bottles are in both art pieces. The penguin silhouette shows how something as innocuous as a kids’ beverage bottle can go a long way in creating an artistic statement for the species. The other art piece, a 1-metre tall papier-mâché sliding penguin depicts the bird sliding freely on ice, is a sight often seen in the Antarctic region.

“Penguins are very cute, and I’m sad that they can die when people throw plastics into the sea without thinking of the other creatures which live there. We hope people will help to protect the penguins,” said Angel Chua, Primary 6 student, Greenridge Primary School.

Inviting the public – particularly young children – to join their play date, the students set up craft stations to teach visitors how to make a simple penguin craft out of recyclable toilet rolls, which participants could bring home. Students completed each roll with a conservation message about penguins.

To equip these youth conservation ambassadors with knowledge about these charismatic birds, a highly interactive Penguins and Pals workshop was organised on 13 March. At this session, they learnt more about different penguin species, their diet, how they adapt to temperate climates and how penguins seem to ‘fly’ in the water. These students also visited two of the world’s five endangered penguin species that live in Jurong Bird Park – the African penguin and the Humboldt penguin. To inspire more students in GRPS about conservation and ensuring a clean home for penguins and other marine creatures, the students involved in the Earth Day project with Bird Park will share their experiences school-wide during a school assembly talk.

May Lok, Director, Education, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “To interest and inspire youths about wildlife, we work very closely with schools and over the last five years, more than 85,000 students have gone through workshops such as Penguin and Pals. A Penguin Play Date is the perfect example of how students, when empowered with the right knowledge and skills, can lead the charge to drive conservation messages to their peers and families, and encourage them to think of ways to protect the homes penguins and marine creatures. These youths are the most ideal conservation ambassadors.”

Jurong Bird Park has successfully bred the African and king penguins. Three endangered African penguin chicks have successfully hatched since December 2010, with the latest hatching on 14 March 2013. This chick is the first in Jurong Bird Park to have undergone successful artificial incubation at the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC). Five king penguin chicks have hatched since 2008, and the Park is the first institution in South East Asia to successfully breed this species in captivity.

Visitors will be able to view both the papier-mâché sculpture and the 2D silhouette for a month from 20 April at Penguin Coast.

For more information on Jurong Bird Park, please visit www.birdpark.com.sg

With Earth Day and World Penguin Day falling just three days apart, Earth Day at Jurong Bird Park is particularly meaningful for a group of children and youths who have become conservation ambassadors with a determined focus on spreading the message of “Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home”, aimed at protecting penguins and other marine creatures.

With Earth Day and World Penguin Day falling just three days apart, Earth Day at Jurong Bird Park is particularly meaningful for a group of children and youths who have become conservation ambassadors with a determined focus on spreading the message of “Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home”, aimed at protecting penguins and other marine creatures.

Inviting the public – particularly young children – to join their play date, the students set up craft stations to teach visitors how to make a simple penguin craft out of recyclable toilet rolls, which participants could bring home.

Inviting the public – particularly young children – to join their play date, the students set up craft stations to teach visitors how to make a simple penguin craft out of recyclable toilet rolls, which participants could bring home.

Jurong Bird Park has successfully bred the African and king penguins. Three endangered African penguin chicks have successfully hatched since December 2010, with the latest hatching on 14 March 2013.

Jurong Bird Park has successfully bred the African and king penguins. Three endangered African penguin chicks have successfully hatched since December 2010, with the latest hatching on 14 March 2013.

JURONG BIRD PARK ACHIEVES A GLOBAL FIRST WITH THREE WILD ORIENTAL PIED HORNBILL EGGS SUCCESSFULLY INCUBATED

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Number of wild Oriental Pied Hornbills in Singapore increase ten-fold since 2005 through joint conservation efforts.

3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. All three chicks eat 11, eight and four days old respectively. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.

3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. All three chicks eat 11, eight and four days old respectively. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.

3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. Chicks at 24 days old, 20 days old and 16 days old. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.

3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. Chicks at 24 days old, 20 days old and 16 days old. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.

Singapore, 08 March 2013 – In a global first, three Oriental Pied Hornbill eggs rescued from Pulau Ubin have been successfully incubated and hatched at Jurong Bird Park’s Breeding & Research Centre.

“This is the first time Oriental Pied Hornbills have been successfully artificially incubated, and it represents a big step in the conservation of these magnificent creatures native to Singapore and South East Asia,” said Dr Luis Carlos Neves, DVM, Assistant Director, Avian, Jurong Bird Park. “Oriental Pied Hornbills have very unique breeding behavior wherein the female seals herself into a tree cavity to lay eggs and raise the chicks. It is extremely challenging to artificially incubate these eggs, and it is rarely attempted. The fact that we have succeeded is good news for the global avian community as there is currently very limited data on these fascinating birds.”

The three rescued eggs had been abandoned by their mother. On 7 January, Rangers from National Parks Board (NParks) on Pulau Ubin found a nest with a broken seal, and after it was ascertained that the female hornbill had abandoned the nest, the eggs were sent to Jurong Bird Park where they were artificially incubated.

Jurong Bird Park welcomed the first hornbill chick hatchling on 25 January, weighing 22.6g. The second chick hatched 3 days later on 28 January, weighing 21.8g. The last chick hatched on 1 February, at 20g.

After the chicks hatched, they were fed six times a day, on a diet consisting of a mixture of fruit and dried insects. At a month old, they are fed thrice a day, but with an increase in fruit and commercial avian pellets.

Although listed as Least Concern on the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) red list, Oriental Pied Hornbills were not seen in Singapore for 140 years prior to 1994. The last sighting formally recorded was in 1855 by Alfred Russell Wallace. There were various inconclusive sightings over the following years. In 1994, a pair of wild hornbills was sighted on Pulau Ubin. Three years later, the first breeding record of hornbills was observed on Pulau Ubin. By 2005, there were about 10 individuals in the wild. That same year, a collaborative study between Jurong Bird Park, NParks and Singapore Avian Conservation Project was initiated with the intention to study the breeding and conservation of these birds.

With the knowledge gained from observing these birds in the Bird Park, artificial nest boxes were introduced to Pulau Ubin, which greatly increased the breeding of the Oriental Pied Hornbills. During the length of the five year project, Oriental Pied Hornbill numbers in the wild increased from around 10 individuals to 50 individuals. Today there are between 75 – 100 wild Oriental Pied Hornbills in Singapore.

“In addition to being able to marvel at these beautiful birds which are part of the Singaporean heritage, the significant increase in Oriental Pied Hornbill numbers in the wild means that Singapore has more natural fruit dispersers. These mid-sized birds regurgitate some fruit whole, while other fruit are dropped along the way before they are eaten. In this manner, the birds reach areas in Singapore which are untouched and even unknown, helping to re-populate the island with fruit trees,” noted Dr Luis Carlos Neves.

Jurong Bird Park has one of the largest collections of hornbills globally, with 17 species represented. The Park has 16 Oriental Pied Hornbills, some of which can be seen at the Hornbills & Toucans exhibit. During breeding season which takes place from November to March, cameras will be installed in the Oriental Pied Hornbill exhibit, and visitors can catch a glimpse of nesting activities through television screens placed at the exhibit.

For more information about Jurong Bird Park, please visit www.birdpark.com.sg.

FURRY AND FEATHERED FRIENDS FROM WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE WISH EVERYONE A YEAR OF HAPPINESS AND PROSPERITY

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Jurong Bird Park, Singapore Zoo, River Safari and Night Safari celebrate Chinese New Year with a line-up of festive activities.

Celebrate the Chinese New Year with an abundance of love and affection from animal friends like Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo who will be handing out lucky red packets at Jurong Bird Park; a stunning dragon dance at Night Safari; and Kai Kai and Jia Jia who have put their sincere wishes on exclusive panda collectibles at River Safari.

Celebrate the Chinese New Year with an abundance of love and affection from animal friends like Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo who will be handing out lucky red packets at Jurong Bird Park; a stunning dragon dance at Night Safari; and Kai Kai and Jia Jia who have put their sincere wishes on exclusive panda collectibles at River Safari.

Singapore, 22 January 2013 – The animal kingdom joins the Chinese New Year festivities with a myriad of celebratory activities at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo.

Getting up close with snakes
To celebrate the Year of the Snake, Jurong Bird Park and Singapore Zoo will set up snake-themed educational booths with show-and-tell sessions by conservation ambassadors, exhibitions about lives of snakes, and hand painting activities where children can get a snake painted on their hands! In addition, get closer views through special CNY exhibits of the dog-toothed cat snake and royal python at Jurong Bird Park, and the blood python and mangrove snake at Singapore Zoo. Guests of Singapore Zoo will also be able to take photographs with a scaly friend as a memento of their visit during the Year of the Snake.

Lion Dance and Night-time Dragon Dance
Soak up the Chinese New Year spirit with the high-octane Southern lion dance performances on high poles at the entrance plazas of both Jurong Bird Park and Singapore Zoo. Over at Night Safari, the dark night will be illuminated with the dance of a mystical dragon, a creature of ancient Chinese tales and a close relation to the snake.

Festive greetings from the animals
At Jurong Bird Park, the recently launched High Flyers Show will feature a special Chinese New Year twist. Guests will receive red packets delivered by air from Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo, and well- wishes of ‘Gong Xi Fa Cai’ from Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon.

Over at River Safari, be entertained by the antics of Kai Kai and Jia Jia, icons of peace and good fortune. Guests can also bring them home – in the form of cuddly plush toys. They can be purchased at the House of Kai Kai and Jia Jia at River Safari’s Giant Panda Forest, at $68 a pair, or $38 each if bought separately.

Festive decorations
The sensational and elaborate festive floral decorations around WRS parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo – have over the years almost become an attraction on their own for returning guests. Bursts of colour set the perfect backdrops for photos with loved ones.

There will also be photo opportunities with mascots representing prosperity and good fortune several times daily during the festive period.

Delicacies and special delights
From 4-24 February:
Flamingo Lodge and Lakeview Ballroom at Jurong Bird Park, Ulu Ulu Safari Restaurant at Night Safari, and Forest Lodge at Singapore Zoo will be serving the Family Reunion Menu at $598+ for 10 diners by special reservations. Tuck into a sumptuous 8 course meal amidst the tranquil surroundings of WRS parks and relish dishes like Baby Abalone with “Ling Zhi” Mushrooms in Oyster Sauce, Dual Flavoured Fried Prawns and Prosperity Yu Sheng.

From 10-12 February:
Ah Meng Restaurant at Singapore Zoo, which pays homage to our orang utan, icon, the late Ah Meng, will be having a festive buffet promotion, offering international selections at $30 (Adult) and $22 (Child), from 11.30am to 5.30pm.

At River Safari Teahouse, special Chinese New Year set menus, featuring dishes such as XO sauce fried rice with preserved meat, will be offered from $68+ (2 persons) to $268+ (8 persons).

Yu Sheng:
Tantalise your taste buds with complementary flavours of sweet, sour and spicy with our Prosperity Yu Sheng. This ever popular must-have dish for Chinese New Year is available at Ah Meng Restaurant at Singapore Zoo, Ulu Ulu Safari Restaurant at Night Safari and River Safari Tea House for $8 (2 pax) to
$38 (10 pax), from 4-24 February.

F&B Reservation Details

F&B Reservation Details

Reservations can be made through Catering Sales and are subject to availability. For reservations and enquiries please call 6360 8560 or email event.sales@wrs.com.sg at least 3 days in advance.

Activity details (Jurong Bird Park)

Activity details (Jurong Bird Park)

Activity details (Night Safari):

Activity details (Night Safari):

Activity details (Singapore  Zoo):

Activity details (Singapore Zoo):

For more information on Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo and their Chinese New Year activities, please visit http://www.wrs.com.sg/

NINE IN 10 STARS OF NEWLY LAUNCHED HIGH FLYERS SHOW HATCHED AND RAISED IN JURONG BIRD PARK

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Singapore, 2 January 2013 – The breeding programme at Jurong Bird Park has been such a success that at least 95% of all the birds in the new High Flyers Show are hatched and raised in the Park.

“We are very proud of our breeding successes and having no lack of ‘local’ talent in the new Show. We feel like proud parents when we see these birds which we have hand raised from young showcasing their abilities to our guests from all over the world, and in doing so, inculcate in them an appreciation of conservation and avian life,” said Mr Raja Segran, General Manager, Jurong Bird Park.

The first show in Jurong Bird Park began 30 years ago, and was helmed by birds like Big John and Sammy the cockatoos, Rod Stewart the Egyptian vulture and Harry the hornbill. At that time, 30% of the birds in the Show were home-grown, with the rest acquired via exchanges with other institutions. The establishment of the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC) six years after the first show greatly boosted the Park’s avian numbers. On average, more than 300 chicks annually have successfully hatched at the BRC over the past 24 years.

“Whenever possible, we leave the eggs to the parents to incubate and raise, but in certain instances where the parent had a history of breaking their own eggs, or are young parents, is when we step in and bring the eggs to the BRC for hand-rearing. Eventually, some of these birds are used in the Show.” continued Mr Raja Segran.

Three birds from the Show did not hatch in Bird Park, but one of them came to be part of the Show through an interesting twist of events. When the BRC underwent renovation in 2011, workers found three barn owls residing in the darkest corner of the roof of the BRC. They hatched under the BRC’s roof, and their parents took off during the construction period. Keepers took the barn owl chicks under their wing and cared for them until they were ready to fledge. One of the chicks is affectionately named Mystic, and it will show off its prowess as a silent hunter of the night as it swoops to bring down a prey. The other two birds which did not hatch in Bird Park are Amigo and Quincy, both yellow-naped Amazons which are renowned for their ability at mimicry.

Be sure to make a date with ‘local’ talent of the feathered variety at the High Flyers show which happens twice daily, at 11.00am and 3.00pm at the Pools Amphitheatre in Jurong Bird Park. Normal admission applies to Jurong Bird Park (Adults $20; Child $13), but there is no fee required to watch the High Flyers Show.

Mystic, the barn owl which became part of the High Flyers Show after it was found abandoned in the Breeding & Research Centre’s roof

Mystic, the barn owl which became part of the High Flyers Show after it was found abandoned
in the Breeding & Research Centre’s roof

High Flyers Show’s finale, with more than 100 birds on stage.

High Flyers Show’s finale, with more than 100 birds on stage.

FEAST YOUR EYES ON THE VIBRANT ENERGY OF BIRD SHOWS CAPTURED THROUGH THE LENS OF PARK VISITORS

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PHOTOGRAPHERS PAY TRIBUTE TO 30 YEARS OF SHOWS AT JURONG BIRD PARK IN ‘PICTURE THE COLOUR’ COMPETITION

Singapore, 5 December 2012 – As part of the festivities to celebrate 30 years of great shows, Jurong Bird Park organised ‘Picture the Colour’ photo competition for the second year running and drew close to 900 entries from park visitors which captured amazing avian action.

Under the theme of ‘Shows’, a key criteria was for the photograph to have a show presenter and birds in the shot, making it a real challenge for participants. Aside from the main theme, participants were also judged on composition, subject, technical detail, and creativity.

Ms C.S. Ling, a Nikon Professional Photographer, as well as professional industry photographers including Mr Lee Tiah Khee, Chief Photographer from Lianhe Zaobao, Ms Joyce Fang, Chief Photographer from The Straits Times and Mr Terence Tan, a freelance photojournalist, were among the panel of distinguished judges.

The judges concurred that, “the winning photographs in the Professional category stand out on their own creative merits, portraying the interaction and action between the presenter, audience and birds. The winning entries are candid, well-captured and well-composed, all requiring a measure of technical skill. The first prize winning entry drew us immediately into the moment. The photographer could have gone up close, but instead chose to show a mixture of foreground and background in two different dimensions, which made the photograph clearly stand out from the rest.”

They added that in the Amateur category, “to create a lively shot with limited camera functions is a challenge, and these photographs are winners in their ability to tell a story, and to capture emotion and action. In animal photography, what matters is the photographer’s eye for detail. Capturing the birds in sharp focus is important, but capturing the defining moment is the key.”

Every photograph submitted also had another chance to win through a Facebook voting contest, where members of the public could vote daily for their favourite pictures.

The newly crowned winners walk away with Nikon products such as the D7000, D5100 and D3100 DSLR camera kits, the Nikon 1 J1 and other cameras from the COOLPIX series. Other prizes include vouchers from Cathay Photo, as well as Jurong Bird Park merchandise.

Selected photographs from this competition will be showcased in an exhibition from 14 December 2012 – 27 January 2013 at the Jurong Regional Library. Two photography talks on 29 December 2012 will also be conducted by Nikon Professional Photographer, Ms C.S. Ling, who will showcase some of her most iconic photographs in her career as a wildlife photographer and illustrate how each fleeting moment is captured on camera. Towards the end of the talk, she will share thoughts on photographing birds, and audiences will have the opportunity to ask questions as well.

“We are heartened that through ‘Picture the Colour’, the life and energy of our shows are so perfectly encapsulated in individual frames that tell the story of bird shows at Jurong Bird Park. It was very moving to go through the entries sent in by park visitors, and see the show in stills through their eyes,” said Mr Raja Segran, General Manager, Jurong Bird Park. “This competition would not have been possible without the staunch support of our partners, namely Cathay Photo, Nikon, and the judges.”

For more information on ‘Picture the Colour’ photography competition, please visit: http://www.birdpark.com.sg/events-promos/picturecolour-12.html

Winners in the Professional category:

Winning picture in the professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Gan Ai Lee, taken with a Nikon D5100. Titled ‘Pelicans Feed,’ it was taken during the daily 2pm Pelican Chitchat feeding session, featuring more than 50 birds from seven pelican species.

Winning picture in the professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Gan Ai Lee, taken with a Nikon D5100. Titled ‘Pelicans Feed,’ it was taken during the daily 2pm Pelican Chitchat feeding session, featuring more than 50 birds from seven pelican species.

First runner up in the professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by William Heng Ser Kheng, taken with a Canon 7D. Titled ‘A falconer on his steed’, it was taken during the daily 10am and 4pm Kings of the Skies Show, featuring 28 birds from 15 species.

First runner up in the professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by William Heng Ser Kheng, taken with a Canon 7D. Titled ‘A falconer on his steed’, it was taken during the daily 10am and 4pm Kings of the Skies Show, featuring 28 birds from 15 species.

Second runner up in the professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Oliver Kau, taken with a Nikon D90. Titled ‘Synchronised flight,’ it was taken during the daily 11am and 3pm Birds n Buddies Show, featuring more than 80 birds from 14 species.

Second runner up in the professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Oliver Kau, taken with a Nikon D90. Titled ‘Synchronised flight,’ it was taken during the daily 11am and 3pm Birds n Buddies Show, featuring more than 80 birds from 14 species.

Winners in the Amateur category:

Winning picture in the amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Tan Meng Liang, taken with a Sony HX 9V. Titled ‘A Feathered Balance,’ it was taken during the daily 11am and 3pm Birds n Buddies Show, featuring more than 80 birds from 14 species.

Winning picture in the amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Tan Meng Liang, taken with a Sony HX 9V. Titled ‘A Feathered Balance,’ it was taken during the daily 11am and 3pm Birds n Buddies Show, featuring more than 80 birds from 14 species.

First runner up in the amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Tay Heng Lai, taken with a Panasonic DMC LX5. Titled ‘An eagle swoops’, it was taken during the daily 10am and 4pm Kings of the Skies Show, featuring 28 birds from 15 species.

First runner up in the amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Tay Heng Lai, taken with a Panasonic DMC LX5. Titled ‘An eagle swoops’, it was taken during the daily 10am and 4pm Kings of the Skies Show, featuring 28 birds from 15 species.

Second runner up in the amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Ayu Permatasari, taken with a Nikon COOLPIX S80. Titled ‘Right here waiting,’ it was taken during the daily 2pm Pelican Chitchat feeding session, featuring more than 50 birds from seven pelican species.

Second runner up in the amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Ayu Permatasari, taken with a Nikon COOLPIX S80. Titled ‘Right here waiting,’ it was taken during the daily 2pm Pelican Chitchat feeding session, featuring more than 50 birds from seven pelican species.

Winners in the Facebook voting category:
Professional:

Winning picture in the Facebook voting professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Josef Emilio Uriarte Campos, taken with a Nikon D7000. Titled ‘Two birds in hand,’ it garnered 1,694 votes and the picture was taken during the daily 11am and 3pm Birds n Buddies Show, featuring more than 80 birds from 14 species.

Winning picture in the Facebook voting professional category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture
the Colour photo competition by Josef Emilio Uriarte Campos, taken with a Nikon D7000. Titled ‘Two
birds in hand,’ it garnered 1,694 votes and the picture was taken during the daily 11am and 3pm Birds
n Buddies Show, featuring more than 80 birds from 14 species.

Amateur:

Winning picture in the Facebook voting amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the Colour photo competition by Ayu Permatasari, taken with a Nikon COOLPIX S80. Titled ‘A vulture lands on an elated guest,’ it garnered 1,447 votes and the picture was taken during the daily 10am and 4pm Kings of the Skies Show, featuring 28 birds from 15 species.

Winning picture in the Facebook voting amateur category in Jurong Bird Park’s Picture the
Colour photo competition by Ayu Permatasari, taken with a Nikon COOLPIX S80. Titled ‘A vulture
lands on an elated guest,’ it garnered 1,447 votes and the picture was taken during the daily 10am
and 4pm Kings of the Skies Show, featuring 28 birds from 15 species.

GLITZ AND GLAMOUR TAKE CENTRESTAGE AT JURONG BIRD PARK THIS DECEMBER

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Vicky, a great pied hornbill, flies to a Show Presenter in the High Flyers Show

Singapore, 31 October 2012 – Shows have been synonymous with Jurong Bird Park for 30 years. This December holidays, the Birds n Buddies Show will make way for the conservation-driven High Flyers Show. In line with the new show, guests visiting the Bird Park this December will experience
glitz and glamour the moment they arrive at the Park.

From the Palm Plaza to the ticketing entrance, guests will enter a world where colour lives, resplendent with colourful macaws and golden hoops centered around showbiz. Next stop – the Penguin Coast walkway, which transforms into a Walk of Fame! One photo wall will be lined with photographs of Shows dating back 30 years, and the other will showcase bird stars from the High Flyers Show. To satisfy the need for posing with flair, a giant photography backdrop with props awaits at Penguin Coast for guests to feel like stars. During weekends at 1.45pm, head back to Penguin Coast where all-time bird stars will make a special guest appearance at the Walk of Fame. Guests will hear more about their stories of stardom from the presenter, and have a chance to take a photograph with the bird stars.

More photography opportunities abound – A flock of young flamingos are eager to have their minutes of fame! Happening daily after the High Flyers Show, for 15 minutes at 11.45am and 3.45pm, guests can mingle with them and have an exclusive photograph taken with them after the new High Flyers Show at the Pools Amphitheatre.

An exclusive segment with a great photographic opportunity has been added to the weekend Penguin Feeding sessions. As guests learn more about these tuxedoed creatures, one lucky child who can answer a simple question will be invited to try his / her hand at feeding the African penguins in this up-close opportunity.

After seeing and taking pictures with so many feathered stars, it is also time to ponder – what makes a star? Held over the December weekends at 10.30am and 11.45am at the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC), A Star is Born is a programme for children between the ages of 6-12. Here, they will find out why birds are talented and gifted with abilities to sing, dance and draw from our avian experts!

After a day out at Bird Park, hang out at Terrace Kiosk right next to the Pool’s Amphitheatre for some yummy treats! Available all day throughout December, these cool treats and snacks are available at special combo prices starting from $7.90 for a hot dog set with fries and a drink. While at the Bird Park, do grab some specially priced retail merchandise at Wings, Feathers and Lory Loft while stocks last, like the motif mug at $22.90 which comes with a choice of either a free flamingo or penguin plush worth $15.90.

December will be a star-studded one out west at Jurong Bird Park, so make tracks here soon! There is no extra charge for the activities, but normal admission rates of $18 (adult) and $12 (child) apply.

An Avian Keeper feeds the African penguins during the Penguin Feeding session.

Activity details

SCHOOL’S OUT! HEAD DOWN TO JURONG BIRD PARK WHERE LEARNING TAKES FLIGHT

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Singapore, 19 October 2012 – With the school holidays right around the corner, it’s time to immerse the children in some experiential learning, which will definitely get them all excited. Three educational programmes have been planned at Jurong Bird Park for the November / December vacation for children to get an up close encounter with the feathered kind.

The Junior Avian Keeper programme is a one day activity on 23 November for children between the ages of 10-12 years old. As the name suggests, children don keeper uniforms and immerse themselves into the work of the Avian Keepers – preparing feed and enrichment for some of the most fascinating birds. They will get to feed birds with the food they have prepared, and learn how to care for little chicks too. Additionally, participants will also get an introduction to the inner workings of the Bird Park, go behind the scenes to the Avian Hospital to learn more about what it takes to be a veterinarian in the Park, and work under the guidance of keepers from Penguin Coast, Lory Loft and the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC).

A few days later, it’s time to embark on a quest to find out more about birds around us. The 3-Day Bird Quest Camp is a full day activity without a sleep-over component. Happening from 28 – 30 November, each day focuses on a different theme, like Birds of Prey, Feeding Time and Watery World. Children will become little avian experts as they come face to face with the world’s largest and smallest egg, unearth the secrets to nest building, learn about the unique adaptations in birds which make them the masters of flight, and lots more.

Holidays are not quite complete without a sleep-over. How about a cozy sleep-over in full view of the Park’s penguins? Sleep with the Penguins Family Camp is scheduled to be from 1 – 2 December, and the whole family is invited! Families will have plenty to laugh and learn together as they get an up close encounter while feeding birds, learn all about eggs and chicks at the BRC, meet Pinky the Humboldt penguin and have a photograph taken with her, and even pitch a tent for the night! As night falls, owls awaken, it’s time to heed the call to visit the World of Darkness.

There are limited places for each of the activities, so do make a reservation early! For more information on any of the programmes listed above, please visit Public Programmes at http://education.birdpark.com.sg.

Activity details
Junior Avian Keeper programme
Date: 23 November 2012 (Friday)
Time: 8.45am – 5.45pm
Age: 10-12 years old
Cost: $200 (Price excludes 7% GST, 10% off for Feather Friends, Friends of the Zoo or Wildlife Unlimited / Plus Family Membership)

Registration closes on 10 November 2012. To register, please contact Cyrena Lin at cyrena.lin@wrs.com.sg or at 6661 7838.

3-Day Bird Quest Camp
Date: 28 – 30 November (Wednesday – Friday)
Time: 9.00am – 5.00pm (all 3 days)
Age: 7 – 12 years old
Cost: $250 (Price excludes 7% GST, 10% off for Feather Friends, Friends of the Zoo or Wildlife Unlimited / Plus Family Membership)

Registration closes on 10 November 2012. To register, please contact Amberly Chew at amberly.chew@wrs.com.sg or at 6661 7809.

Sleep with the Penguins Family Camp
Date: 1 – 2 December 2012 (Saturday – Sunday)
Time: 2.00pm (Saturday) – 10.00am (Sunday)
Age: Families with children ages 3 and above
Cost: $110 per adult and $90 per child (excluding 7% GST, 10% off for Feather Friends, Friends of the Zoo or Wildlife Unlimited / Plus Family Membership)

Registration closes on 10 November 2012. To register, please contact Ong Peiying at peiying.ong@wrs.com.sg or at 6661 7819.

Children see up close how chicks are fed in the Junior Avian Keeper programme

A participant gets a chance to have a Harris Hawk on her fist in the Bird Quest Camp

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