WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE TO ADOPT NEW ELEPHANT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

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New system deemed to provide higher degree of safety; Overhaul to be implemented in phases

Singapore, 15 December 2014 – Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) will be phasing in the protected contact elephant management system for all elephants in Night Safari and Singapore Zoo over the next few years.

When fully in place, all staff training and interaction with elephants under the protected contact system will be conducted through a physical safety barrier. The protected contact management system is based on positive reinforcement where animals are motivated by rewards such as food.

The two parks will be among the first zoological institutions in Asia to implement the protected contact management system for all elephants in its collection. Among the modern zoo community, this method is currently deemed to be the safest way to manage elephants while ensuring proper animal care and welfare.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, WRS, said, “The decision to adopt the protected contact management system was made after an internal review by our elephant managers and healthcare experts, who found that this system of management offers a safer work environment for the elephant keepers. Importantly, the new system will continue to allow our keepers access to the elephants for their daily care, although separated by a safety barrier.”

The complete implementation of the protected contact system will take three to five years as it will involve major redesign and construction of the elephant exhibits, back-of-house facilities as well as re-training of our elephants and elephant keepers.

The first phase of moving towards the protected contact system will be the cessation of programmes involving direct visitor contact with the elephants. From 5 January 2015, elephant rides and other activities where elephants are taken out of their exhibits will cease at the zoo. This is to allow the elephants to spend more time in the exhibits and to socialise among themselves.

Visitors to Singapore Zoo will still be able to enjoy the Elephants at Work and Play show (available twice daily at 11.30am and 3.30pm), and take part in elephant feeding sessions which happens after each show.

Dr Cheng continued, “Providing meaningful interactive opportunities with our animals is one of the most valuable services we bring to our visitors. Our new elephant exhibits will be designed to enable up-close encounters, and give us the chance to offer new behind-the-scenes experiences.”

Wildlife Reserves Singapore gets industry nod at Singapore Experience Awards 2014

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Night Safari wins Best Attraction and receives Exceptional Achievement Award;
WRS receives four awards for the year

Singapore, 31 October 2013 – Night Safari wins Best Attraction at Singapore Experience Awards for the third consecutive year, bringing the biggest cheer for the Wildlife Reserves Singapore team who walked away with four accolades at the Singapore Experience Awards 2014.

In a year where Night Safari celebrates its 20th anniversary, the world’s first wildlife park for nocturnal animals was recognised for providing the ‘Best Visitor Attraction Experience’, making this its 12th honour in this category. As it is Night Safari’s third consecutive year winning this accolade, the park also received an Exceptional Achievement Award under the Special Recognition category.

Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO of Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “It is a great tribute to receive these awards and the team is both honoured and euphoric. We are especially happy about the Night Safari win. The home-grown attraction celebrates her 20th anniversary this year, and being recognised yet again as the Best Visitor attraction is testament of the team’s hard work and commitment to providing the ultimate night-time wildlife experience to visitors.”

Being the world’s first nocturnal zoo, Night Safari’s unique offering and stellar reputation has made her a firm favourite and iconic attraction for both foreign and local visitors. Through the years, the team has worked hard to maintain this world class establishment.

Hosted and presented by the Singapore Tourism Board, the Singapore Experience Awards is Singapore tourism’s highest accolade; celebrating the luminaries who constantly innovate and create distinctive and compelling Singapore experiences.

In the awards category for marketing and media, ‘River Safari: The River is Calling’ won the Most Innovative Marketing Idea. This award celebrates marketing and promotional efforts through creative campaigns and media that showcase the compelling sights and sounds of Singapore.

In the awards category for individuals, a Wildlife Reserves Singapore employee from Singapore Zoo, Divine Real Clenista Santos walked away with the award for Best Customer Service (Retail).

Tan Han Qiang and Bryan Lim Kuan Loong were also nominated by the public for their exemplary performance at the Singapore Zoo and Jurong Bird Park respectively, and were finalists in the Best Customer Service (Attractions).

Results were unveiled at a gala presentation ceremony this evening. Finalists in each category were nominated by industry players and experts, with the final winner picked by a panel of judges.

Mr Lee added, “Receiving industry recognition at the Singapore Experience Awards is a great honour, and it no doubt spurs the team on to continue giving our best efforts to provide our guests with memorable wildlife experience in Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo.”

WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE PRESENTS WORLD’S RAREST BABIES TO MARK WORLD ANIMAL DAY 2014

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Critically endangered Sunda pangolin, cotton-top tamarin and southern river terrapin
among animal births this year; giant river otters produce two babies.

Radin, Night Safari’s third and newest Sunda pangolin baby, rests in the protective clutch of his mother Nita. Found throughout primary and secondary forests of Southeast Asia, Sunda pangolins, also known as Malayan pangolins, are critically endangered as populations in the wild are experiencing rapid decline. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Radin, Night Safari’s third and newest Sunda pangolin baby, rests in the protective clutch of his mother Nita. Found throughout primary and secondary forests of Southeast Asia, Sunda pangolins, also known as Malayan pangolins, are critically endangered as populations in the wild are experiencing rapid decline.
Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Singapore, 2 October 2014 – To mark World Animal Day this year, Wildlife Reserves Singapore announced the arrival of some of the world’s rarest babies, among them the critically endangered Sunda pangolin that is native to Singapore.

Between January and August 2014, over 400 animal babies were born or hatched in Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo. Nearly one in four babies belongs to animals listed as ‘threatened’ in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species* and these include the Bali mynah, Javan langur, proboscis monkey and giant anteater.

The birth of a critically endangered Sunda pangolin in Night Safari is one of the most iconic births for WRS as the species is native to Singapore and is the logo for the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund. Night Safari is the world’s first zoological institution to house the elusive, solitary, nocturnal creature which in recent years has been driven closer to extinction by illegal animal trafficking, habitat loss and being hunted for their meat and scales at an unsustainable level. This is the third successful birth of a Sunda pangolin in WRS since 2011.

Another exciting development comes from the giant river otters at River Safari which displays this rare species for the first time in Asia. While their first pup in 2013 did not survive, the giant otters are now proud parents of two new pups. Parents Carlos and Carmen have become more experienced in raising their young and have started teaching the pups how to swim.

Giant river otter Carmen brings her pups for a swimming lesson at River Safari – the first zoological institution in Asia to display this endangered species. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Giant river otter Carmen brings her pups for a swimming lesson at River Safari – the first zoological institution in Asia to display this endangered species.
Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Over at Jurong Bird Park, a Goliath palm cockatoo is successfully bred for the first time. Goliath palm cockatoos have one of the lowest hand-rearing success rates among the parrot species due to their specialised diet. The park also successfully bred eight critically endangered Bali mynahs. Conservation efforts for the species intensified in 2010 – the year which marked the start of a partnership with Indonesia’s Begawan Foundation. Bred specifically to increase the off-site numbers of Bali mynahs in the wild, all progenies will eventually be sent back to Bali.

Singapore Zoo is ecstatic to welcome the births of two critically endangered species to its collection: the cotton-top tamarin and southern river terrapin. Singapore Zoo also saw the birth of an endangered proboscis monkey this May and the park continues to house the largest collection of proboscis monkeys in the world, outside of Indonesia.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “The world is undergoing an unprecedented loss of wildlife as a direct result of human related activities. Each of these births represents a precious glimmer of hope in our effort to help save the planet’s biodiversity. Many of them are part of coordinated conservation breeding programmes to safeguard against extinction in the wild. All of them are invaluable ambassadors for their species
to connect our visitors to the need for their protection.”

*International Union for Conservation of Nature

SAFARI GATE PROVIDES EASY ACCESS TO MANDAI WILDLIFE PARKS

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- Convenient, comfortable service ensures seamless transition to Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo

Newly launched Safari Gate provides easy access to Mandai wildlife parks (Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo) from the city, and enhances the visitor experience by providing hourly departures and on-board entertainment that gives visitors an insight into each park. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Newly launched Safari Gate provides easy access to Mandai wildlife parks (Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo) from the city, and enhances the visitor experience by providing hourly departures and on-board entertainment that gives visitors an insight into each park. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 29 April 2014 – The world-renowned wildlife parks in the Mandai cluster – Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo – are now more accessible with Safari Gate, a unique tourism offering conceptualised by DUCK & HiPPO and Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS).

Visitors who enter the Safari Gate (at Suntec City or Singapore Flyer) will find themselves in the immersive world of wildlife that the Mandai attractions are famous for, with credit to the beautiful rainforest-themed interiors created by WRS landscape architects. From the holding area, visitors are ushered into the premium Rhino coach, which will take them directly to WRS’ parks in Mandai.

“Conceived jointly by WRS and DUCK & HiPPO, Safari Gate is a game changer, a departure from the current market offering of fixed-time group tours. It puts control back in the hands of the visitors. With hourly departures to the parks, 10 trips a day, visitors get to tour at their own time and pace. It’s free and easy, no more fixed timing or itinerary,” said Mr James Heng, Chief Duckie, DUCK & HiPPO.

Mr Lee Meng Tat, Chief Executive Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Wildlife Reserves Singapore is constantly looking for ways to enhance visitor experience in our parks; and with Safari Gate, we are moving a step beyond our parks’ boundaries to enhance the transport touchpoint for our visitors. We seek to provide a seamless and convenient transition for them to get from the city to Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo, and back.”

Ms Ranita Sundramoorthy, Director of Attractions, Dining and Retail, Singapore Tourism Board said, “Safari Gate is an excellent example of how industry players can come together to find synergies and collaborate creatively to enhance the visitor experience. The Singapore Tourism Board welcomes more of such partnerships.”

Safari Gate was officially launched today by Mr James Heng and Mr Lee Meng Tat. As part of the launch, a group of special guests from the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) were among the first to experience this premium service, and to enjoy an afternoon at River Safari.

Safari Gate allows visitors flexibility to start their tour at any time. With hourly departures from the city to the parks from as early as 8.30am and the last returning coach at 10:30pm, there are more then 10 trips per day to choose from. As an added service, DUCK & HiPPO provides free transfer from city hotels to the two Safari Gates.

Visitors are also free to tour at their own pace, and can make the most of their time at the parks without being tied down to a specific itinerary or fixed time departure.

Along the way, on-board entertainment gives visitors an insight into each park, and allows them to plan their visit prior to their arrival. The 45-minute Rhino coach to Mandai is no longer a mundane bus ride. It is a prelude to a wild adventure. More information about Safari Gate is available at www.safarigate.com.

EXPERTS AIM TO SAVE ONE OF SINGAPORE’S MOST THREATENED UNIQUE SPECIES AT INAUGURAL ROUNDTABLE ON FRESHWATER CRAB CONSERVATION

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NParks, NUS, IUCN, and WRS among agencies collaborating to save endemic crabs, including Johora singaporensis which is among the 100 most threatened species in the world.

Singapore, 29 March 2014Johora singaporensis, commonly called the Singapore freshwater crab, is arguably one of the most threatened unique species of Singapore. To discuss ways to develop an overall plan for conservation of this species, experts convened in the inaugural Roundtable on Freshwater Crab Conservation which began with a two-day closed-door panel discussion, and concluded with a public forum on 29 March 2014.

The critically endangered Singapore freshwater crab (Johora singaporensis), is among the 100 most threatened species in the world. Found only in Singapore, it grows up to 3cm across the carapace, or the shell, and up to 5cm with the legs stretched out. It performs an important role in the proper functioning of hill streams by helping in nutrient recycling, and is potentially an indicator of pollution and climate change. PHOTO CREDITS: DANIEL NG

The critically endangered Singapore freshwater crab (Johora singaporensis), is among the 100 most threatened species in the world. Found only in Singapore, it grows up to 3cm across the carapace, or the shell, and up to 5cm with the legs stretched out. It performs an important role in the proper functioning of hill streams by helping in nutrient recycling, and is potentially an
indicator of pollution and climate change. PHOTO CREDITS: DANIEL NG

The four organisations involved are National Parks Board (NParks), National University of Singapore (NUS), International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS). The inaugural Roundtable on Freshwater Crab Conservation is funded by the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund.

First discovered and described in 1986, the Singapore freshwater crab (Johora singaporensis) is listed as Critically Endangered in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™, and is among the 100 most threatened species in the world. This endemic species, only found in Singapore, grows up to 3cm across the carapace, or the shell, and up to 5cm with the legs stretched out. It performs an important role in the proper functioning of hill streams by helping in nutrient recycling, and is potentially an indicator of pollution and climate change.

The critically endangered Singapore freshwater crab (Johora singaporensis), is among the 100 most threatened species in the world. Found only in Singapore, it grows up to 3cm across the carapace, or the shell, and up to 5cm with the legs stretched out. It performs an important role in the proper functioning of hill streams by helping in nutrient recycling, and is potentially an indicator of pollution and climate change. PHOTO CREDITS: CAI YIXIONG

The critically endangered Singapore freshwater crab (Johora singaporensis), is among the 100 most threatened species in the world. Found only in Singapore, it grows up to 3cm across the carapace, or the shell, and up to 5cm with the legs stretched out. It performs an important role in the proper functioning of hill streams by helping in nutrient recycling, and is potentially an indicator of pollution and climate change. PHOTO CREDITS: CAI YIXIONG

“When I discovered and named this species in the 1980s, I had no idea that its future would be a matter of debate and concern some 25 years on,” said Professor Peter Ng of the Department of Biological Sciences at the NUS Faculty of Science. “It heartens me that so many people are now trying to save this ‘insignificant invertebrate’ from imminent extinction. It would indeed have been a dark tragedy if discovering the species all those years ago was merely a prelude to its extinction. I hope it is not.”

“Crabs such as Johora singaporensis are typically found in hill streams, which is a rare habitat in Singapore to begin with, being restricted to only the central part of the island,” added Assistant Professor Darren Yeo, who is also with the Department of Biological Sciences at the NUS Faculty of Science.

Decade-long monitoring of the populations of Johora singaporensis has revealed that these crabs have an environmental preference for relatively clean and fast-flowing streams in the highlands with a near neutral pH. Presently, the crab is found largely in Bukit Batok, Bukit Gombak and Bukit Timah Nature Reserve. They can persist even in small fragmented habitats under the right conditions. Current conservation efforts include plans to establish a breeding programme, as well as an ongoing two-year research project launched in 2013 by NParks and NUS to study the conditions of the crabs’ existing habitats and possible remedial actions. As conservation efforts gain momentum, the next important milestone is to gather key stakeholders together to improve them.

The Roundtable on Freshwater Crab Conservation brings together key stakeholders involved in conservation of the iconic Johora singaporensis, for consolidation and dissemination of results of ongoing freshwater crab conservation efforts in Singapore. Foreign and local ecologists including researchers from the National University of Singapore and officers from the National Parks Board working on Johora singaporensis, as well as other members from Wildlife Reserves Singapore, Nature Society Singapore, Ministry of Defence, Singapore Land Authority, National Environment Agency, Public Utilities Board, and Urban Redevelopment Authority have all been invited to participate, brainstorm, contribute their unique perspectives, and help mould a future conservation plan for this species.

Dr Lena Chan, Director of National Biodiversity Centre, NParks, said, “NParks is committed to the conservation of our native freshwater organisms, particularly endemic species like the Singapore Freshwater Crab Johora singaporensis, Johnson’s Freshwater Crab Irmengardia johnsoni and Swamp Forest Crab Parathelphusa reticulata. We look forward to our usual amicable multi-agency co-operation which is crucial for the success of this conservation initiative.”

Dr Neil Cumberlidge, Chair of the IUCN SSC Freshwater Crab and Crayfish Specialist Group, and Dr Philip McGowan of the IUCN Species Survival Conservation Planning Sub-Committee will both participate in the Roundtable, adding valuable inputs to the design of the conservation plan. Dr McGowan said, “Effective conservation in today’s world has to balance the needs of species with those of people and their interests. Our approach has evolved to reflect that. The purpose of strategic planning is to understand what is driving the threats to the Singapore freshwater crab and then develop a holistic and realistic way forward that gives this iconic species the best chance of survival. Strategic planning on its own will not save the species, but the understanding and agreement that is part of the planning process, greatly improves its survival prospects.”

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore said, “Wildlife Reserves Singapore is continuously exploring ways we can work with field researchers, and contribute to the ex-situ conservation of Johora singaporensis. A possible method may be to establish a trial breeding project in River Safari for these native crabs, followed by the eventual reintroduction of the species into restored, rehabilitated streams.”

This Roundtable is also indicative of Singapore’s willingness and seriousness regarding the protection of its freshwater biodiversity and the ‘not-so-charismatic’ fauna.

RIVER SAFARI CELEBRATES OFFICIAL GRAND OPENING

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- Asia’s first and only river-themed wildlife park houses 6000 animal specimens from over 200 species. Latest WRS attraction set to enhance wildlife experience in Mandai.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong officiated at the Grand Opening of River Safari, Asia’s first and only river-themed wildlife park on 28 February 2014, and is seen here with Wildlife Reserves Singapore Chairman Ms Claire Chiang, both symbolically rowing the boat forward for River Safari. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong officiated at the Grand Opening of River Safari, Asia’s first and only river-themed wildlife park on 28 February 2014, and is seen here with Wildlife Reserves Singapore Chairman Ms Claire Chiang, both symbolically rowing the boat forward for River Safari. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Singapore, 28 February 2014 – Mandai, an area synonymous with Singapore Zoo and Night Safari, has become even more wild today with the much-anticipated official opening of River Safari, Asia’s first and only river-themed wildlife park.

River Safari is the latest addition to Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s portfolio of award-winning parks, which includes Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, and Singapore Zoo. With a unique focus on freshwater habitats, the park adds a new dimension to the wildlife experience in Singapore.

Mr Lee Hsien Loong, Prime Minister of Singapore, officiated the grand opening before 300 guests.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong together with Mr S Iswaran, Minister, Prime Minister’s Office, Second Minister for Home Affairs and Trade & Industry having an up-close encounter with a Brazilian tapir along the Amazon River Quest on 28 February 2014, at the Grand Opening of River Safari. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong together with Mr S Iswaran, Minister, Prime Minister’s Office, Second Minister for Home Affairs and Trade & Industry having an up-close encounter with a Brazilian tapir along the Amazon River Quest on 28 February 2014, at the Grand Opening of River Safari. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “We are very proud today to officially introduce River Safari to the world. From conceptualisation and design to construction and completion, River Safari represents our dedication to conserve wildlife, our commitment to educate the public about threats to freshwater habitats, and our passion to create an enriching and fun recreational venue for visitors all over the world.”

The journey to creating Asia’s first and only river-themed park started with an idea to create a freshwater aquarium to complement the offerings of Singapore Zoo. This spark evolved and gave rise to River Safari.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong admires the gracefulness of the endangered giant river otters at Amazon Flooded Forest as they swim by, during River Safari’s Grand Opening on 28 February 2014. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong admires the gracefulness of the endangered giant river otters at Amazon Flooded Forest as they swim by, during River Safari’s Grand Opening on 28 February 2014. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Today, the 12-ha River Safari offers visitors a wildlife adventure inspired by the world’s most iconic rivers, including the Amazon, Ganges, Mekong, Nile and Yangtze rivers. Built at a cost of $160 million, River Safari houses one of the world’s largest collections of freshwater fauna. To date, the park features 6,000 animal specimens representing 200 species, of which 40 are threatened. These include river giants and mega fishes such as the giant river otter, giant freshwater stingray, Mekong giant catfish and Singapore’s very own pair of resident giant pandas, Kai Kai and Jia Jia.

WRS parks are world-renowned for their open concept exhibit design, and with River Safari, the team pushed the boundaries further and created a park that would provide visitors with an unforgettable adventure through the world’s most iconic rivers.

Manatees and River Safari’s team of aquarists at the world’s largest freshwater aquarium in Amazon Flooded Forest, thanking Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong for gracing River Safari’s Grand Opening on 28 February 2014. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Manatees and River Safari’s team of aquarists at the world’s largest freshwater aquarium in Amazon Flooded Forest, thanking Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong for gracing River Safari’s Grand Opening on 28 February 2014. All photos provided by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

“The park has been well-received since we opened the Giant Panda Forest in Nov 2012, and our soft opening in Apr 2013. We have already welcomed more than 1.1 million visitors from all over the world and this shows that visitors are curious about the world of river habitats. We feel positive that River Safari has a huge role to play in satisfying this hunger for knowledge about freshwater inhabitants,” said Ms Chiang.

When visiting River Safari, visitors can look forward to interactive and digital educational interpretives, discovery stations where visitors can learn more about animals and freshwater conservation issues and behind-the-scene tours which provide a clearer glimpse into the world these animals live in.

River Safari opens daily from 9:00am to 6:00pm and tickets are priced at S$25 (adult), S$16 (child between 3-12 years) and $12.00 (local senior citizens 60 years and above). From 5 March 2014, tickets to the Amazon River Quest boat ride will be priced at S$5 (adult) and S$3 (child).

For more information, please log on to www.riversafari.com.sg

HUMAN RACE INTRIGUES ANIMALS AT SAFARI ZOO RUN 2014

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- Over 8000 runners show up in race to pay homage to the late Ah Meng, Singapore Zoo’s orang utan as elephants, lions, and rhinoceros watch on.

Singapore, 16 February 2014 – Unlike the usual lazy Sunday morning spent lounging in the treetops, the orang utans in Singapore Zoo watched curiously as runners raced in the Safari Zoo Run 2014, which was conceived six years ago to commemorate their most famous matriarch, Ah Meng.

Over 8000 runners arrived at Singapore Zoo for the run to pay homage to the late Ah Meng, one of Singapore’s most loved and iconic animal personalities, which died of old age in February 2008. The race spans across Singapore Zoo and Night Safari, taking runners through lush green paths and enthralling animal exhibits.

The Safari Zoo Run also aids in wildlife conservation; a portion of the proceeds from this year’s race will go towards the care of endangered animals in Night Safari and Singapore Zoo.

(Centre, on stage) Guest-of-Honour Mr Ching Wei Hong, Chairman, National Family Council, flags off the annual Safari Zoo Run. He said, “I’m delighted to see the many families and happy faces today participating in the Safari Zoo Run. These families have created special family moments today, which will stay with them for life. This is in essence what we hope to promote through ‘Families for Life’ – to encourage families to spend more time together and strengthen family bonds. The Safari Zoo Run is an excellent event for families, and the Families for Life Council hopes to work with more like-minded partners to create opportunities for family bonding.” PHOTO CREDITS: PINK APPLE

(Centre, on stage) Guest-of-Honour Mr Ching Wei Hong, Chairman, National Family Council, flags off the annual Safari Zoo Run. He said, “I’m delighted to see the many families and happy faces today participating in the Safari Zoo Run. These families have created special family moments today, which will stay with them for life. This is in essence what we hope to promote through ‘Families for Life’ – to encourage families to spend more time together and strengthen family bonds. The Safari Zoo Run is an excellent event for families, and the Families for Life Council hopes to work with more like-minded partners to create opportunities for family bonding.” PHOTO CREDITS: PINK APPLE

A spirited crowd over 8000-strong, which included these enthusiastic children, participated in the Safari Zoo Run 2014, and ran amidst the lush greenery of Singapore Zoo and Night Safari as lions, rhinoceros and elephants, among other wild creatures, watched on. PHOTO CREDITS: PINK APPLE

A spirited crowd over 8000-strong, which included these enthusiastic children, participated in the Safari Zoo Run 2014, and ran amidst the lush greenery of Singapore Zoo and Night Safari as lions, rhinoceros and elephants, among other wild creatures, watched on. PHOTO CREDITS: PINK APPLE

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