WHEN TWO’S A COUPLE AND THREE’S NOT A CROWD

1 Comment

JURONG BIRD PARK CELEBRATES LATEST CUDDLY ADDITION TO ITS AFRICAN PENGUIN COLONY

Singapore, 05 October 2011 – Less than a year after moving to a new home, a pair of African penguins are proud parents of a feisty penguin chick. The couple, who were originally residents of Singapore Zoo, started breeding and nesting soon after relocating to their new home in Jurong Bird Park.

The cuddly chick was hatched on 22 August 2011 and at just 10 days old, weighed 425g; a desirable weight for an African penguin hatchling. Unlike adult penguins, a hatchling usually dons a grey juvenile plumage after its first moult of feathers which occurs between its second and third month of life.

“We are delighted to welcome Bird Park’s first African penguin chick. Birds normally breed when they feel safe, happy and secure in their environment. Although the penguins have been here for only 9 months, they have already acclimatised to their new environment under the watchful eye of the keepers. The hatchling is the first for the five-year-old female penguin, Mate,” said Mr Raja Segran, General Manager, Jurong Bird Park. “While Mate and the male African penguin, Captain, have very good chemistry, they required some help from our keepers when it came to nesting at their new home at the Park.”

As part of the husbandry procedures in the Bird Park, avian keepers provided sand and hay as nesting materials to encourage them to breed. Diet also plays an important part, and all the above, coupled with tender loving care from the keepers, were key in making the African penguins feel comfortable and secure to engage in breeding.

Previously categorised as ‘Vulnerable’ under the IUCN Red List for bird species, African penguins are now recognised as an endangered species. The decline in the population is attributed to lack of food due to over-fishing in surrounding waters. Other reasons include hunting by predators and egg-collecting.

Commonly found in the offshore islands along the coast of South Africa and Namibia, these penguins are also widely known as Jackass penguins because of their donkey-like bray. Easily seen with black stripes and spots similar to the Humboldt penguin, African Penguins are the only penguin species which are adaptable to temperate climates.

The Penguin Coast, consisting of an outdoor and an indoor exhibit spanning 1,600 metres, is home to six penguin species at the bird park. The indoor climate-controlled den features the Humboldts, Rockhopper, Macaroni, Fairy and King Penguins, while African Penguins bask in the outdoor enclosure.

Mate and Captain

Mate and Captain

KING PENGUINS TO JOURNEY NORTH TO GUANGZHOU

Leave a comment

FOUR CAPTIVE-BRED BIRDS TO MOVE TO CHINA AS PART OF CONSERVATION PROGRAMME WITH PANYU XIANGJIANG SAFARI PARK

Singapore, 05 August 2011 – Four king penguins from Jurong Bird Park, the world’s largest avian park, will soon be flown to China as part of an exchange programme between Jurong Bird Park, an award winning park under Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and Panyu Xiangjiang Safari Park in Guangzhou, China.

The exchange is part of a Memorandum of Understanding signed between both parties to improve conservation efforts through the sharing of resources and knowledge. “We are the only institution in South East Asia to successfully breed king penguins in captivity, and we are happy to share our breeding expertise with Panyu Xiangjiang Safari Park,” said Mr Raja Segran, General Manager, Jurong Bird Park. “The successful breeding of animals in captivity will ensure the survival of endangered species in the wild and also serves the purpose of educating visitors about the wildlife we have on our planet.”

The king penguins, two male and two females aged about four years old each, were first identified based on suitable age and sexual maturity. Subsequently, the captive-bred penguins were isolated prior to export to allow daily observations of their health status prior to departure.

They will undergo a routine veterinary check today, which is an important step in getting them ready for their trip on 16 August. Vets will conduct physical examinations and blood tests to ensure the birds have a clean bill of health.

Easily identified by their striking ear patches of golden-orange feathers, king penguins are the second largest species of penguin after the Emperor penguins, and one of the six species that can be found at the Jurong Bird Park’s Penguin Coast. This latest attraction features a total of 96 penguins of six different species, including the Humboldt, Rockhopper, Macaroni, Fairy and the African penguin, a recent addition that is adaptable to tropical climate. This exhibit features two 15-minute feeding sessions daily at 10.30am and 3.30pm where visitors can learn more about the different breeds and their feeding habits.

Frost, a 4 year old king penguin at Jurong Bird Park being restrained by his keeper, Angelin.

Dr Melodiya Magno conducting a physical check up on Frost.

Dr Melodiya about to collect a blood sample from Frost to run blood tests to check his health status.

Taking a blood sample from Frost’s neck for laboratory testing.

HUMBOLDT PENGUIN TRANSFORMS INTO A REAL ‘BELLE’

Leave a comment

A FEATHERLESS PENGUIN REGAINS HER PLUMAGE WITH SOME UNUSUAL HELP FROM AVIAN EXPERTS AT THE JURONG BIRD PARK

Singapore, 28 April 2010 – It was a pretty sight when Belle, the now-famous Humboldt penguin, at the Jurong Bird Park frolicked with her fellow penguins in her full-feathered glory recently. It was not too long ago that the 10-year-old was a featherless oddity and was treated like an outcast by her colony. She had missed her moulting cycle and was virtually ‘bald’ for the past four months.

Resourceful keepers and vets at the Bird Park chanced on the idea of designing a customised wet suit for the little Humboldt, which helped her stay buoyant and warm in the water. Together with a carefully managed holistic treatment that included husbandry practise and medication, Belle showed positive signs of recovery. Her feathers have since grown back, and she is now flaunting her full plumage.

Angelin Lim, avian keeper at the Jurong Bird Park, said, “We named this penguin Belle, with hopes that she will return to her beautiful self. Therefore, we were very encouraged when downy feathers started to show after we put her in a cut-out of a human wet suit in January. Her mood improved because she could swim and interact with her fellow penguins. While her condition may have been caused by stress or hormonal imbalance, it was the combination of this unusual ‘wet suit therapy’ and proper medication that led to her dramatic recovery. We are so happy to see Belle back at the Penguin Coast.”

The Penguin Coast is the Bird Park’s latest attraction, featuring a total of 96 penguins from six different species, including Humboldt, Rockhopper, Macaroni, Fairy, King Penguin and the latest African Penguin, a recent addition to the penguin family that is adaptable to tropical climates.

Penguin Coast hosts two 15 minute feeding sessions daily at 10.30am and 3.30pm to educate visitors about penguins and their feeding habits.

Belle showing positive signs of ‘recovery’ as she starts moulting again

Belle showing off her slow but sure transformation

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 71 other followers