AN OVERALL PAW-SITIVE RESULT FOR INUKA, SINGAPORE ZOO’S POLAR BEAR

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- First polar bear born in the tropics undergoes annual health-check.

Singapore, 4 November 2013 – As Inuka, Singapore Zoo’s 22 year old polar bear entered his senior years, Singapore Zoo’s vet team performed a health check on him under general anesthesia on 9 October 2013. The first polar bear to be born in the tropics was found to be in general good health for his age. He currently measures 2.5m from nose to tail, and weighs 532kg.

The hour-long medical examination included dental, aural and paw checks. Blood results show no abnormality in his kidneys and liver. There are some warty growths on the underside of his tongue, and a biopsy has been done to confirm if they are benign and can be left alone. Inuka’s teeth also needed some attention, which was to be expected at his age. X-rays of his lower limbs confirmed what his vets have suspected for some time; that he has mild arthritis on his ankle and right wrist joints. The vets will prescribe medications as required, to manage his arthritis.

After the examination, Inuka was revived with a reverse sedative and allowed to recuperate in his den. Within two days, he was back to basking in his ice cave and in no time was paddling in his pool, at Singapore Zoo’s Frozen Tundra.

A team of six from the veterinary department of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (parent company of Singapore Zoo) conducted various tests and observations on Inuka simultaneously to minimise sedation time. Here, a member of the medical team takes a closer look at Inuka’s teeth while Head Vet Dr Serena Oh checks on his shoulder, where he was darted.

A team of six from the veterinary department of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (parent company of Singapore Zoo) conducted various tests and observations on Inuka simultaneously to minimise sedation time. Here, a member of the medical team takes a closer look at Inuka’s teeth while Head Vet Dr Serena Oh checks on his shoulder, where he was darted.

Checks on large and dangerous animals are often conducted in the animal’s den to minimise the time they are sedated. During these times, vets use a portable x-ray machine to take x-rays of animal’s various body parts.

Checks on large and dangerous animals are often conducted in the animal’s den to minimise the time they are sedated. During these times, vets use a portable x-ray machine to take x-rays of animal’s various body parts.

Inuka’s paw measures an astounding 20cm across, which makes the hand of a grown man look miniscule in comparison!

Inuka’s paw measures an astounding 20cm across, which makes the hand of a grown man look miniscule in comparison!

RIVER SAFARI CELEBRATES SINGAPORE FOOD FESTIVAL WITH FEAST OF SINGAPORE DELICACIES

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Gastronomical and wildlife adventure at Asia’s first and only river-themed wildlife park.

Cantonese Roast Pork

Cantonese Roast Pork

Singapore, 10 July 2013 – In celebration of the Singapore Food Festival this July, visitors can look forward to exploring Asia’s first and only river-themed wildlife park and indulging in a mouthwatering seven-course feast at a special price of S$68+.

The experiential dining journey begins with lunch at River Safari Tea House, the park’s Chinese restaurant that features cuisine from the main dialect groups in Singapore. Set in a quaint teahouse setting, visitors can savour six tantalizing Asian delights including Teochew Bak Kut Teh, Hakka Yong Tau Foo and Cantonese Roasts.

After lunch, visitors can embark on a wild adventure in the park and meet over 5,000 animal specimens representing 300 species, including endangered giants such as the giant river otter, Mekong giant catfish and giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia.

A sweet finale of delectable desserts await at the Mama Panda Kitchen. The dessert platter includes cempedak crème brulee, fresh tropical fruits and the ever-popular panda paus for a pandastic ending in the park.

Claypot "Three Cups" Chicken

Claypot “Three Cups” Chicken

THE SINGAPORE FOOD FESTIVAL 2013
Singapore Delicacies @ River Safari

Date
13 July 2013 (Sat), 14 July 2013 (Sun), 20 July 2013 (Sat), 21 July 2013 (Sun)

Price
Adult: $68+
Child (3 to 12 years old): $48+
Above prices include admission to River Safari. For reservations, please call 6360 8560 or email event.sales@wrs.com.sg

Programme
11.30am to 12.00pm: Registration and collection of admission tickets at River Safari Tea House (Located near River Safari Entrance Plaza)
12.00pm to 1.30pm: Lunch at River Safari Tea House
1.30pm to 3.00pm: Free and easy tour at River Safari
3.00pm to 4.30pm: Dessert platter at Mama Panda Kitchen (Located near Giant Panda Forest)

Panda Pau

Panda Pau

Menu

The Singapore Food Festival 2013 Sampler
Cantonese Roast Combination: Honey Char Siew, Roasted Pork & Soya Sauce Chicken
Teochew Bak Kut Teh
Claypot “Three Cups” Chicken
Hokkien Five Spice Prawn & Pork Roll
Hakka Yong Tou Foo
Hainanese Claypot Vegetables
Chef’s Special Seafood Fried Rice
Jasmine Tea
Free Flow Soft Drinks or 1 Glass of Tiger Beer

Mama Panda Kitchen Dessert Platter

Panda Pau
Cempedak Crème Brulee
Fresh Tropical Fruits Platter
Coffee / Tea

SINGAPORE ZOO TURNS 40 WITH WILD BIRTHDAY BASH

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CELEBRATIONS CONTINUE WITH YEAR-ROUND ACTIVITIES. ZOO THANKS NATION WITH SPECIAL 40% OFF ADMISSION PRICE FOR SINGAPOREANS IN JULY.

Singapore, 27 June 2013Singapore Zoo turned 40 today and a party was thrown in her honour to mark the momentous occasion. Mr S.R. Nathan, Sixth President of Singapore, was present for the celebrations alongside those who have helped in her growth as a world-renowned zoo, including popular animal stars such as the orang utans.

Guest of Honour Mr S R Nathan at Elephant garlanding

Guest of Honour Mr S R Nathan at Elephant garlanding

“Singapore Zoo turning 40 is a very significant occasion for us at Wildlife Reserves Singapore. In the past 40 years, Singapore Zoo has become a fun and educational institution that both Singaporeans and international friends love. Many of us have grown up with her and many more have fond memories of coming to the zoo with our families, friends and teachers,” said Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore. “This journey has been one filled with much excitement along the way and we have treasured every minute of it because we want people from around the world to be inspired by nature and develop a deep appreciation for wildlife.”

Mr S R Nathan and Ms Claire Chiang officiated Singapore Zoo's 40th Birthday Celebrations

Mr S R Nathan and Ms Claire Chiang officiated Singapore Zoo’s 40th Birthday Celebrations

Singapore Zoo first opened its doors to visitors on 27 June 1973 with a collection of 272 animals representing 72 species. This was after five years of development work which began in 1968 when Dr Ong Swee Law, Chairman of Singapore’s Public Utilities Board, conceived the idea of locating the zoo in the catchment forests around the Upper Seletar Reservoir.

Since then, the Zoo has established herself as one of the world’s finest, not only for her unique collection of animals and immersive exhibits, but also for her leadership in conservation, education and recreation. Some of her fondest memories include the first orang utan birth in 1975, the opening of the Children’s Zoo and Adventureland in 1980, and the release of the first free-ranging animals – the squirrel monkeys, cotton-top tamarins and cotton-eared marmosets – in the zoo in 1992. Today, she has a collection of over 2,800 animals of over 300 species, 26 per cent of which are threatened.

Orang Utan Chomel meets Mr S R Nathan

Orang Utan Chomel meets Mr S R Nathan

Orang Utans enjoying the Singapore Zoo 40th Birthday Fruit cake

Orang Utans enjoying the Singapore Zoo 40th Birthday Fruit cake

Annually, over 1.7 million Singapore and international visitors enjoy experiential learning journeys at the award-winning zoo. Singapore Zoo has become an evergreen destination which many visitors discover as children. As years pass, they re-visit as parents when their own little ones are growing up, and eventually return as grandparents with their grandchildren.

“As our world continues to urbanise, we have an even more important and urgent task at hand of educating the public to appreciate, protect and secure the future of our most valued assets – wildlife – because once gone, we won’t get to enjoy that anymore. Singapore Zoo will continue its mission to inspire its visitors to develop an appreciation for nature and wildlife. We look forward to stronger collaborations with our partners to bring fun and value to our visitors, especially the young ones,” said Ms Chiang.

Mr S R Nathan signing on the Singapore Zoo 40th Birthday Card

Mr S R Nathan signing on the Singapore Zoo 40th Birthday Card

As a gesture of thanks to the local community, 40th birthday surprises will continue all year round, starting with a 40% discount on admission throughout July for all Singaporeans and permanent residents to join in the merriment and celebrate the park’s milestone birthday.

In addition, guests can take part in the 40 Wild Years Trail, and redeem retail and F&B offers upon completion. The trail will run from 27 June – 31 July 2013 and consists of five questions that will take visitors to some iconic sites within Singapore Zoo. Activity sheets will be available at all Singapore Zoo ticket counters.

For more information and the latest updates on Singapore Zoo’s 40th anniversary celebrations, visit www.zoo40.zoo.com.sg, or www.facebook.com/wrs.sg.

CONSERVATION OF PANGOLINS GIVEN HOPE AT INAUGURAL ‘SCALING UP PANGOLIN CONSERVATION’ CONFERENCE

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First ever conference by IUCN Pangolin Specialist Group and Wildlife Reserves Singapore to be a global voice in the protection and conservation of pangolins.

Pangolin and young

Pangolin and young

Singapore/London, 19 June 2013 – Wildlife Reserves Singapore and the International Union for Conservation of Nature Species Survival Commission (IUCN-SSC) Pangolin Specialist Group have come together to organise the first ever global conference on the rather shy, nocturnal pangolins which for years have been under threat from poachers for their meat and scales.

Themed ‘Scaling up Pangolin Conservation’, the four day conference from 24 – 27 June held at Night Safari aims to devise an overarching conservation strategy to improve their conservation efforts with specific and measurable initiatives, and to provide input into formal IUCN Red List assessments to reassess their status to further protect the species.

Professor Jonathan Baillie, Conservation Programmes Director at the Zoological Society of London and Co-Chair of the IUCN-SSC Pangolin Specialist Group said, “This is a landmark event in pangolin conservation, we will have 50 researchers from around the world gathered to set a road-map for conserving pangolins over the next decade. Especially important here is formulating ways to reduce demand for pangolins in Asia.”

While they may look like walking pine-cones, pangolins, or scaly-anteaters as they are also known, are one of the most trafficked mammals in Asia, and increasingly, in Africa. Globally, they are illegally traded in their tens of thousands each year.

This trade is primarily to China and Vietnam where they are considered a delicacy and their scales used in traditional medicines. In response to the magnitude of trade and other threats including loss of habitat and ill-considered land management practices, the IUCN-SSC Pangolin Specialist Group, an expert group of pangolin conservationists, was established in February 2012.

“Rapid action is urgently needed if pangolins in Africa and Asia are to be conserved given the rate at which they are being exploited for East Asian luxury markets,” commented Dan Challender, Co-Chair of the IUCN-SSC Pangolin Specialist Group and doctoral candidate at the University of Kent’s Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology.

The inaugural pangolin conference is part of Wildlife Reserves Conservation Fund’s (WRSCF) efforts to conserve endangered native wildlife. Since its inception in 2009, the Fund has supported various projects and conferences.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer at Wildlife Reserves Singapore said, “For years WRS has been working on helping our critically endangered species locally, via research and captive breeding. We are very pleased to co-organise and host this event, bringing together the foremost pangolin experts in the world, striving to find a strategy that will help this group of unique animals globally.”

To further raise public awareness to the plight faced by the pangolins, a free for public seminar will be held on 28 June from 12.30pm – 4pm at the Forest Lodge in Singapore Zoo with a series of four talks by experts:

  1. Trade in wildlife for meat and medicines pushing Southeast Asian species towards extinction by Chris Shepherd, Acting Regional Director for TRAFFIC in South-East Asia
  2. From the IUCN SSC and new technology for addressing illegal wildlife trade by Jonathan Baillie, Conservation Programmes Director at the Zoological Society of London and Co-Chair of the IUCN-SSC Pangolin Specialist Group
  3. The pangolin trade in Asia by Dan Challender, Co-Chair of the IUCN-SSC Pangolin Specialist Group and doctoral candidate at the University of Kent’s Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology
  4. Pangolins of Singapore: In situ and ex situ conservation efforts by Razak Jaffar, Assistant Curator, Night Safari, Wildlife Reserves Singapore

As there are limited seats to the public seminar available, interested participants are advised to RSVP by 21 June to Yap Xinli at xinli.yap@wrs.com.sg.

Additionally, to extend the message on pangolin conservation even further to the visitors at Night Safari, an outreach programme has been planned. Visitors to Night Safari on 21, 22, 28 and 29 June will be able to hear more about pangolins from the keepers at a short 15minute session starting from 9.15pm at the Pangolin Exhibit along the Fishing Cat Trail. Over the years, Night Safari has fine-tuned captive management of these unassuming creatures and has achieved a global first: The world’s first institution successfully to breed and raise the Sunda pangolin in captivity.

The ‘SCALING UP PANGOLIN CONSERVATION’ CONFERENCE has been made possible thanks to the generous support of Wildlife Reserves Singapore, Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund, the Zoological Society of London, San Antonio Zoo, the Houston Zoo, TRAFFIC and Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong.

NIGHT SAFARI UNVEILS ART SEEN AND HERD! EXHIBITION ON WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY

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SINGAPORE, 6 June 2013 – After weeks of brainstorming and preparation, Night Safari’s Art Seen & Herd! exhibition was officially unveiled to the public yesterday, in celebration of World Environment Day. Visitors to Night Safari were treated to a visual bonanza as four of Singapore’s street artists unleashed wild artworks inspired by threatened animals to spread awareness about poaching and the dwindling wildlife population.

The four artists – Michael Ng (‘Mindflyer’), Samantha Lo (‘SKL0’), Luthfi Mustafah (‘The Killer Gerbil’) and Eman Jeman (‘ClogTwo’) – also shared the inspiration and ideas behind their works, as well as the conservation messages that they hope to convey to visitors. Animals featured in the exhibition are often hunted and farmed to feed continuing consumer demand for animal parts for use in traditional medicine, despite the presence of synthetic substitutes or there being no real evidence of the efficacy of these treatments.

Visitors can catch this free exhibition from now till 15 July 2013 at Night Safari’s entrance plaza. To encourage students to learn more about the threats facing wildlife, Night Safari is offering a 50% discount on admission after 9pm from 1 June to 31 August 2013. The Art Seen & Herd! project also encourages students to take action by sharing information on the threats facing the animals and what they can do to save these species via popular social media platforms such as Instagram. More information on the contest and student discounts is available at www.nightsafari.com.sg

SAVE THE GAME by Eman Jeman (‘ClogTwo’)

SAVE THE GAME by Eman Jeman (‘ClogTwo’)

SAVE THE GAME by Eman Jeman (‘ClogTwo’)

Like a game, the fate of the Indian rhino results in a win or loss. Long regarded as a symbol of strength, the rhino horn is ironically the bane of the animal. Rhinos are hunted for their horns to be used in traditional medicine. In actual fact, the rhino’s horn is made up of keratin, the exact same substance that our hair and nails are made of, and have no proven medical use.

So why not say NO to using animal parts? Save the game, save the rhinos.

PLIGHT NO MORE by Michael Ng (‘Mindflyer’)

PLIGHT NO MORE by Michael Ng (‘Mindflyer’)

PLIGHT NO MORE by Michael Ng (‘Mindflyer’)

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A whimsical artwork with a message of hope and courage. A group of tiny spacemen are busy at work, trying to free a helpless Asiatic black bear from a bear bile farm by cutting off the chains and attaching wings to help it fly away to safety.

Imagine being trapped and housed in a tiny, restrictive ‘crush cage’, tortured by pain and insanity to get your bile juice extracted daily from a thick needle inserted into your abdomen, all in the name of ‘traditional medicine’. This bile-drawing process is painful, stressful and cruel. Will you be able to bear with this?

Say NO to using animal parts and help keep their lives bearable.

TURN A BLIND EYE by Luthi Mustafah (‘The Killer Gerbil’)

TURN A BLIND EYE by Luthi Mustafah (‘The Killer Gerbil’)

TURN A BLIND EYE by Luthi Mustafah (‘The Killer Gerbil’)

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With the endless hunt for their ivory tusks and loss of natural habitats through deforestation, Asian elephants are rapidly depleting in numbers.

In this interactive artwork, wooden blinds form the canvas representing the once sprawling woods the elephants inhabit. Turning the blind first reveals a cry for help for the elephants before ending with a solemn and dark ending for the elephant from the loss of its tusks and natural habitat. This is a grave reminder for us not to turn a blind eye to the dire state of the elephants. The ivory trade must stop and it must begin with us.

Say NO to buying ivory products and give these gentle giants a chance to live.

BAI SWEE by Samantha Lo (‘SKL0’)

BAI SWEE by Samantha Lo (‘SKL0’)

BAI SWEE by Samantha Lo (‘SKL0’)

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‘Bai Swee’, in the Hokkien dialect, means ‘only for show or display purposes’. Which leaves us to think, what is real anymore?

The once majestic Malayan tigers are now merely puppets of the human race. As their strength and dominance in this world wane, we can only see their former selves portrayed and kept alive by their human keepers. Here lies a grim reminder that we have to work harder to preserve what nature offers or soon we will only have soulless and empty shells of the Malayan tigers.

Many of these majestic felines have been hunted for their parts to be used in traditional medicine. Tiger parts, like any other animal parts, can be replaced by alternative formulas in traditional medicine.

Say NO to using animal parts and help keep these beautiful creatures living in the years to come.

POLAR BEAR INUKA MOVES INTO NEW FROZEN TUNDRA EXHIBIT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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First polar bear born in the tropics back with new neighbours, the raccoon dogs and wolverines.

Inuka, the first polar bear born in the tropics

Inuka, the first polar bear born in the tropics

Singapore, 29 May 2013 – The first polar bear born in the tropics, Singapore Zoo’s very own Inuka, moved into his new Frozen Tundra home today during a grand ‘housecooling’ party. The 2,700 sq metre exhibit features climate controlled resting areas, an expanded pool for Inuka to swim in, and two new sections for Inuka’s new neighbours: raccoon dogs and wolverines.

Modelled closely after the arctic habitat, some of the innovative features of Frozen Tundra that help replicate the chilly climate of the arctic include a new, larger pool filled with giant ice blocks so Inuka can enjoy refreshing swims, and an ice cave where he can retire to, to enjoy a polar siesta. Natural substrates have also been incorporated to provide him with a rich and varied home.

Frozen Tundra is the result of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS)’s commitment to upgrade Inuka’s living space and also reinforce WRS’ vision of providing visitors with interactive and enriching wildlife exhibits that provide for greater knowledge of the natural world, including of the climate, wildlife and issues facing the arctic habitat.

“At Singapore Zoo, we remain committed to not only providing a fun and beautiful park where families can bond over the wonders of mother nature, but also to our vision of engaging and educating our visitors about the natural world, the animals that share our planet and their habitats. This is a core value of Singapore Zoo,” said Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, WRS. “Those values and goals go hand in hand with our deep love of our animal friends here at Singapore Zoo, and Inuka is a shining example of that love.”

Dr Lee Boon Yang, Chairman of SPH and SPH Foundation, officiated the launch ceremony of Frozen Tundra with Mr Lee and WRS board member Mr Chia Ngiang Hong. SPH Foundation is a long-time adopter of Inuka.

The launch of Frozen Tundra also showcases Inuka’s new neighbours, the raccoon dogs and wolverines. Raccoon dogs, also known as tanuki, are native to East Asia. Frozen Tundra’s raccoon dogs are named Pom and Poko and come from Japan’s Asahiyama Zoo.

Wolverines are the largest land-dwelling species of the weasel family. Native across the Northern Hemisphere, wolverines have adapted to a wide range of habitats. Frozen Tundra’s wolverines are a brother and sister pair named Boris and Ivana from Russia’s Novosibirsk Zoo.

The idea of creating a new habitat for Inuka was conceptualised in 2006, and Frozen Tundra was designed to not only give Inuka a bigger space but more importantly, create a new exhibit that provides visitors a window into the arctic world from which Inuka’s ancestors came from. Native to the Arctic Circle, polar bears are the world’s largest land carnivore and adult males can weigh up to 700 kg.

Classified as vulnerable by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), the bear occupies a narrow ecological niche and preys almost exclusively on seals. Polar bears hunt mostly on ice floes in winter months, and retreating sea ice due to global warming has resulted in the diminishing of their hunting grounds and food sources. If global temperatures continue to rise, polar bears may become extinct across most of their range within a hundred years.

Frozen Tundra opens daily to the public from 29 May 2013. Visiting hours are from 8.30am to 6pm.

Dr Lee Boon Yang, Chairman of SPH and SPH Foundation, officiated the launch ceremony of Frozen Tundra with Mr Lee and WRS board member Mr Chia Ngiang Hong. SPH Foundation is a long-time adopter of Inuka.

Dr Lee Boon Yang, Chairman of SPH and SPH Foundation, officiated the launch ceremony of Frozen Tundra with Mr Lee and WRS board member Mr Chia Ngiang Hong. SPH Foundation is a long-time adopter of Inuka.

Frozen Tundra is the result of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS)’s commitment to upgrade Inuka’s living space and also reinforce WRS’ vision of providing visitors with interactive and enriching wildlife exhibits that provide for greater knowledge of the natural world, including of the climate, wildlife and issues facing the arctic habitat.

Frozen Tundra is the result of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS)’s commitment to upgrade Inuka’s living space and also reinforce WRS’ vision of providing visitors with interactive and enriching wildlife exhibits that provide for greater knowledge of the natural world, including of the climate, wildlife and issues facing the arctic habitat.

The first polar bear born in the tropics, Singapore Zoo’s very own Inuka, moved into his new Frozen Tundra home during a grand ‘housecooling’ party on 29 May 2013. Frozen Tundra was designed to not only give Inuka a bigger space but more importantly, create a new exhibit that provides visitors a window into the arctic world

The first polar bear born in the tropics, Singapore Zoo’s very own Inuka, moved into his new Frozen Tundra home during a grand ‘housecooling’ party on 29 May 2013. Frozen Tundra was designed to not only give Inuka a bigger space but more importantly, create a new exhibit that provides visitors a window into the arctic world

Modelled closely after the arctic habitat, some of the innovative features of Frozen Tundra that help replicate the chilly climate of the arctic include a new, larger pool filled with giant ice blocks so Inuka can enjoy refreshing swims, and an ice cave where he can retire to, to enjoy a polar siesta.

Modelled closely after the arctic habitat, some of the innovative features of Frozen Tundra that help replicate the chilly climate of the arctic include a new, larger pool filled with giant ice blocks so Inuka can enjoy refreshing swims, and an ice cave where he can retire to, to enjoy a polar siesta.

NIGHT SAFARI PRESENTS: ART SEEN & HERD!

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Singapore street artists unleash wild artworks inspired by threatened animals to spread awareness among students about poaching and dwindling wildlife populations; 50% student discount on admission after 9pm from June to August 2013.

Mindflyer, The Killer Gerbil, ClogTwo and SKL0

Mindflyer, The Killer Gerbil, ClogTwo and SKL0

SINGAPORE, 23 May 2013 – For the first time, Night Safari has commissioned four prominent street artists to work on creative art pieces inspired by threatened and endangered animals in a bid to spread awareness of poaching and dwindling wildlife populations and spur action among youths. This visual bonanza, titled Art Seen & Herd!, will be unveiled during the June school holidays in conjunction with the introduction of Asiatic black bears and a new Malayan tiger exhibit at Night Safari.

The Art Seen & Herd! project employs art as a platform to raise awareness of wildlife poaching – one of the greatest threats to some of the world’s most loved species. Animals featured in the exhibition include the Asian elephant, Malayan tiger, Indian rhino, and the newest residents of Night Safari – three Asiatic black bears. These animals are often hunted and farmed to feed continuing consumer demand for animal parts for use in traditional medicine, despite the presence of synthetic substitutes or there being no real evidence of the efficacy of these treatments.

The artists will unleash art pieces highlighting the plight of these species through the visual narratives of their works. The artworks will include graffiti, illustrations and other visual art forms, all aimed at engaging youths in an inclusive, non-conventional and enlightening way.

To encourage students to learn more about the threats facing wildlife, Night Safari invites them for a fascinating journey in the park with 50% discount on admission after 9pm from 1 June to 31 August 2013*. The Art Seen & Herd! project also encourages students to take action by sharing information on the threats facing the animals and what they can do to save these species via popular social media platforms such as Instagram.

Ms Isabel Cheng, Chief Marketing Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Art is a powerful form of expression that can unleash a lot of emotions without the need for words. In particular, street art is energetic, expressive, and genuine. Through this powerful medium, the Art Seen & Herd! project aims to reach out to youths in our continual mission to inspire an appreciation for wildlife and spreading the message on the importance of conservation.”

The four artists, among them award-winning talents, have been involved in various commissioned works, events and exhibitions locally and overseas. They are Michael Ng (‘Mindflyer’), Samantha Lo (‘SKL0’ / ‘Sticker Lady’), Luthfi Mustafah (‘The Killer Gerbil’) and Eman Jeman (‘ClogTwo’). Their creative works have been seen on various mediums from street art, canvases, t-shirts to advertisements.

*STUDENT DISCOUNTS

With great discounts on admission and dining for students, an exciting wildlife adventure awaits at Night Safari, starting with the Art Seen & Herd! exhibition.

Hop onto a tram and journey through seven geographical regions to view over 2,500 nocturnal animals, including the threatened species featured in the exhibition. Then, catch the popular Creatures of the Night Show to see nocturnal animals in action, and explore the walking trails for close encounters with endangered wildlife.

To complete the Night Safari experience, chill out at Bongo Burgers restaurant with a menu that includes juicy gourmet burgers, jumbo hot dogs and chunky fries. This alfresco restaurant also features performances by tribal dancers from the mysterious rainforests of Borneo, who perform fire-eating and blowpipe demonstrations just a few metres away.

1. 50% discount on admission after 9.00pm (Usual Price: $35.00)

  • Promotion is only valid from 1 June 2013 to 31 August 2013.
  • Promotion is only valid for students from secondary schools, junior colleges, polytechnics, universities and educational institutions based in Singapore with a valid photo student ID/student pass/matriculation card.
  • Valid student ID must be presented at point of purchase to enjoy the discount.
  • Purchase of tickets can be done before 9pm, but admission is only valid after 9pm.
  • Tickets must be purchased on-site at Night Safari ticketing counters. Not valid for online ticketing.
  • Each student ID can only purchase a maximum of two admission tickets.
  • Tickets and admission will be subjected to student ID checks upon entering the park.
  • Not valid with other promotions or discounts.

Other terms and conditions apply. For full list, please visit www.nightsafari.com.sg

2. 10% off Bongo Burgers

  • Promotion is only valid from 1 June 2013 to 31 August 2013.
  • Promotion is only valid for students from secondary schools, junior colleges, polytechnics, universities and educational institutions based in Singapore with a valid photo student ID/student pass/matriculation card.
  • Valid student ID must be presented at point of purchase to enjoy the discount.
  • Not valid with other promotions or discounts.

All terms and conditions are subject to change without prior information.

ACTIVITIES

1. Art Seen and Herd! Exhibition
Marvel at this visual spectacle featuring four creative art pieces by local artists ClogTwo, Mindflyer, SKL0 and The Killer Gerbil who have herded together to give a voice to threatened and endangered animal species.

Dates: Daily from 1 June to 15 July 2013
Venue: Night Safari Entrance Plaza (Admission tickets not required)

2. Snap, Share and Win!
Spread your conservation messages and be rewarded with a wild night out!

Instagram Contest Mechanics:

  • Snap a picture of yourself with any of the art pieces
  • Tell us what you can do to save the threatened species illustrated in the art piece (e.g. ‘Elephants are poached for their ivory tusks to be used for medicinal purposes even though there is no scientific evidence on the benefits. Please don’t support the ivory trade’)
  • Post the picture on Instagram, hashtag #seenandherd and tag @nightsafariofficial for a chance to win one Safari Adventurer Tour package for yourself and four friends (worth $640)
  • Contest period: 1 June to 15 July 2013

The Safari Adventurer Tour includes a personalised buggy ride with a guide that will share insider tales about nocturnal animals and wildlife conservation. The winner also takes home exclusive Night Safari merchandise and limited edition gifts designed by the artists.

STEP UP AS A ZOOLYMPIX RESCUE RANGER THIS JUNE HOLIDAYS

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Learn how to help our animal friends in ninth installment of Singapore Zoo’s wildly popular event

At the Rubbish Raft station, learn how you can help reclaim the habitat for wildlife by keeping rivers free from trash.

At the Rubbish Raft station, learn how
you can help reclaim the habitat for wildlife by
keeping rivers free from trash.

Singapore, 8 May 2013 — Zoolympix is back with a resounding bang in 2013! This time, each participant is transformed into a “Rescue Ranger” and gets to learn first-hand how habitat destruction and poaching are driving many animals to extinction. Leaping into its ninth year, Zoolympix will feature six exhibits in the zoo that will double up as interactive game stations. This series of challenging “rescue missions” will test young rangers’ memory, accuracy and agility.

With the zoo also celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, nuggets of historical knowledge will be incorporated into a journey that will both educate and entertain. Participants will learn little-known trivia about some of the zoo’s landmark moments since its opening in 1973.

In addition, stand to win attractive lucky draw prizes that include wildly popular zoo experiences. First prize is a one-year Friends of the Zoo Family membership and 2D1N Sleep with the Beasts Camp, worth over $800 for a family of two adults and two children; second prize is a 4-in-1 Park Hopper family package for two adults and two children and a 3-day Zoo Explorer Camp for one child worth over $600; and third prize is a 3-in-1 Park Hopper and Jungle Breakfast package for two adults and two children worth over $300. Top three winners also win a year’s subscription to Wildlife Wonders, Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s in-house magazine.

Pop into the awareness booth to find out more about endangered local wildlife, and learn what the ‘real’ Rescue Rangers at Wildlife Reserves Singapore parks (meaning the keepers) do to protect these animals. If you’re lucky, you might even get to meet a pangolin! While you’re there, indulge in a spot of face-painting or badge-making. Young readers are also free to browse our educational publications — available in English and mother tongue—and newly-published books about pandas.

Learn more about threatened wildlife at the Zoolympix Awareness Booth, and you might even get to meet a pangolin!

Learn more about threatened wildlife at
the Zoolympix Awareness Booth, and you might
even get to meet a pangolin!

Details
Date: 1 – 9 June 2013 (Daily)
Time: 10am – 4pm
Venue: Singapore Zoo, 80 Mandai Lake Road, Singapore 729826
Fee: $3 per Zoolympix passport, Available at the registration tent at the start of Treetops Trail (in front of the bird photography area)
Notes: Normal admission rates of $22.00 (adult) and $14.00 (child 3 to 12 years) apply. Zoolympix activities are recommended for children between 5 and 12 years old

Rescue Ranger Stations
On Thin Ice
Venue: Frozen Tundra
Climate change is causing the Arctic ice to melt! Help a polar bear find its lunch by hopping between fragmented “ice” pieces to pick up as many seals as possible within 30 seconds.

Seed Seekers
Venue: Tropical Crops (Pavilion opposite Cat Country)
In a world where deforestation is rampant, Rescue Rangers must collect and save the seeds of tropical plants which could be in danger of extinction. Track down plants in the Tropical Crops exhibit and “collect” their seeds by making a shading from the embossed plaques next to them.

Forest Storeys
Venue: Fragile Forest
The first step in wildlife conservation is to understand it better. Test your memory and learn more about animals and their rainforest homes by placing the creatures in the correct layer of their rainforest habitat in 30 seconds.

Rubbish Raft
Venue: Rainforest Kidzworld (Tugboat area)
Make a difference for the many fish, birds, frogs, and other wildlife friends by helping to keep rivers clean. In 30 seconds, scoop out floating rubbish in the water while standing on a raft and do your bit to reclaim the habitat for these river dwellers!

Penguin Eggs-pedition
Venue: African penguin exhibit
African penguins have nowhere to lay their eggs, now that the guano they use as nesting material has been harvested for fertiliser! In 30 seconds, sort penguins’ eggs into colour-coded “igloos” that ingenious scientists have provided as shelter for the eggs.

Stop Those Smugglers!
Venue: Sun bear exhibit
The smallest bear in the world needs to be saved from poachers! Stop sun bear smuggling by ringing in the pesky poachers. Toss rings over as many cone ‘smugglers’ as possible in 30 seconds.

JURONG BIRD PARK TAKES CURIOUS LITTLE MINDS ON A FLIGHT AROUND THE WORLD

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Enjoy 1-for-1 promotions and exciting educational activities from 24 May – 30 June

Singapore, 6 May 2013 – Nourish the imaginative and curious little minds of your child with a learning experience at Jurong Bird Park, where visitors will embark on a round-the-world journey during the June school holiday weekends with a myriad of egg-citing activities.

The fun starts with huge savings off ticket prices with Jurong Bird Park’s buy-1-get-1 free promotion on admission tickets. Flash the coupon found at the Park’s website at the ticketing counters to enjoy this promotion from 24 May to 30 June 2013. The free ticket must be of the same or of a lower value than the ticket purchased.

From 1 to 23 June 2013, there is no better time to take a flap and a flight out west to the Bird Park, to participate in six special programmes which have been exclusively tailored for children to go on an interactive and fun edu-taining journey.

  1. Dora and Diego: Join Dora and Diego from the well-known Nickelodeon cartoon series, Dora the Explorer and Go, Diego, Go!, as they take on Jurong Bird Park as their new destination for learning and discovery. There will be a chance for photo opportunities with Dora and Diego at the Pools Amphitheatre at 12.30pm during the weekends in June.
  2. Explorer of the 5 Continents: Let your child become an ‘Explorer of the 5 Continents’, and nurture their adventurous spirit! Every child will be handed a customised Jurong Bird Park kid’s explorer kit which contains a ‘passport’. With it, children can navigate around the park to collect stamps in their very own Jurong Bird Park explorer passport. Be sure to check in at the exhibits showcasing birds from Australia, South America, Antarctica, Asia and Africa to collect all 5 stamps!
  3. Dr Squawk’s Expedition: Meet Dr Squawk, the popular host of Bird Park Flies to Schools, who teaches children all about birds in an engaging and fun manner. Children between the ages of 5 to 12 years old can sign up for Dr. Squawk’s Expedition in the Bird Park, as she travels to different continents in search of her flightless feathery friends. This will be held at 2.30pm and 4.30pm at the Breeding and Research Centre. Pre-registration is required online, or at the venue at least 15 minutes prior to the start of the programme.
  4. Meet the Bird Stars: Seize the opportunity to get up close to Jurong Bird Park’s most eggxotic birds at a meet-and-greet session featuring unique-looking birds like Harriet the bar pouched wreathed hornbill and learn interesting facts about them at 1.45pm at Penguin Coast!
  5. Be a Junior Avian Keeper: Children who are deeply passionate about wildlife conservation should sign up for two specially organised immersive experiences to learn more about birds. The Junior Avian Keeper Programme for older children on 7 June aims to provide a hands-on experience with tasks such as preparing feed and enrichment for the birds.
  6. Holiday camps: Children between the ages of 6 to twelve can sign up with like-minded friends for the 3-Day Bird Quest Camp from 12 – 14 June, to embark on an expedition where they can experience up-close encounters with feathered friends, unearth the secrets of nest making and learn about how feathers help flight.

The fun does not stop here. After an exhilarating day, do not forget the wildlife conservation messages learnt at Jurong Bird Park. Visit the website and download fun and interactive games created by students from MAGES Institute of Excellence. This final year project by the students consists of 5 games which will be released over a period of 5 months. Through a series of challenges such as choosing the right types of food and working one’s way through a maze to free the birds, the games reinforce the importance of conservation and protection of wildlife. The first game – Born to Fly, which involves guiding a Bali Mynah through forestations while avoiding obstacles and predators – will be made available for download through the website in June, at http://education.birdpark.com.sg.

For more information on Jurong Bird Park, and the June holiday activities, please visit http://www.birdpark.com.sg.

Meet Dr Squawk, the popular host of Bird Park Flies to Schools, as she travels to different continents in search of her flightless feathery friends in Dr Squawk’s Expedition.

Meet Dr Squawk, the popular
host of Bird Park Flies to Schools, as she
travels to different continents in search of
her flightless feathery friends in Dr
Squawk’s Expedition.

Join Dora and Diego from the well-known Nickelodeon cartoon series, Dora the Explorer and Go, Diego, Go!, as they take on Jurong Bird Park as their new destination for learning and discovery.

Join Dora and Diego from the
well-known Nickelodeon cartoon series,
Dora the Explorer and Go, Diego, Go!, as
they take on Jurong Bird Park as their
new destination for learning and
discovery.

Activity Details

Activity Details

CELEBRATING EARTH DAY WITH A PENGUIN PLAY DATE AT JURONG BIRD PARK

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Themed ‘Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home’, primary school children and youths lead the charge to spread penguin conservation messages at the park.

Singapore, 20 April 2013 – With Earth Day and World Penguin Day falling just three days apart, Earth Day at Jurong Bird Park is particularly meaningful for a group of children and youths who have become conservation ambassadors with a determined focus on spreading the message of “Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home”, aimed at protecting penguins and other marine creatures.

Coming together for ‘A Penguin Play Date’, students from Greenridge Primary School (GRPS) and youth volunteers created two gigantic penguin art pieces made of recycled materials at Jurong Bird Park. These art pieces take the form of a 3-metre tall 2D silhouette, and a sliding penguin sculpture. In addition, 12 primary school children between the ages of 9-11 manned craft stations in the park to teach park visitors what they know about penguins and how to protect these birds by minimising waste.

GRPS students took a month to collect about 600 recycled bottles for the play date. The recycled bottles are in both art pieces. The penguin silhouette shows how something as innocuous as a kids’ beverage bottle can go a long way in creating an artistic statement for the species. The other art piece, a 1-metre tall papier-mâché sliding penguin depicts the bird sliding freely on ice, is a sight often seen in the Antarctic region.

“Penguins are very cute, and I’m sad that they can die when people throw plastics into the sea without thinking of the other creatures which live there. We hope people will help to protect the penguins,” said Angel Chua, Primary 6 student, Greenridge Primary School.

Inviting the public – particularly young children – to join their play date, the students set up craft stations to teach visitors how to make a simple penguin craft out of recyclable toilet rolls, which participants could bring home. Students completed each roll with a conservation message about penguins.

To equip these youth conservation ambassadors with knowledge about these charismatic birds, a highly interactive Penguins and Pals workshop was organised on 13 March. At this session, they learnt more about different penguin species, their diet, how they adapt to temperate climates and how penguins seem to ‘fly’ in the water. These students also visited two of the world’s five endangered penguin species that live in Jurong Bird Park – the African penguin and the Humboldt penguin. To inspire more students in GRPS about conservation and ensuring a clean home for penguins and other marine creatures, the students involved in the Earth Day project with Bird Park will share their experiences school-wide during a school assembly talk.

May Lok, Director, Education, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “To interest and inspire youths about wildlife, we work very closely with schools and over the last five years, more than 85,000 students have gone through workshops such as Penguin and Pals. A Penguin Play Date is the perfect example of how students, when empowered with the right knowledge and skills, can lead the charge to drive conservation messages to their peers and families, and encourage them to think of ways to protect the homes penguins and marine creatures. These youths are the most ideal conservation ambassadors.”

Jurong Bird Park has successfully bred the African and king penguins. Three endangered African penguin chicks have successfully hatched since December 2010, with the latest hatching on 14 March 2013. This chick is the first in Jurong Bird Park to have undergone successful artificial incubation at the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC). Five king penguin chicks have hatched since 2008, and the Park is the first institution in South East Asia to successfully breed this species in captivity.

Visitors will be able to view both the papier-mâché sculpture and the 2D silhouette for a month from 20 April at Penguin Coast.

For more information on Jurong Bird Park, please visit www.birdpark.com.sg

With Earth Day and World Penguin Day falling just three days apart, Earth Day at Jurong Bird Park is particularly meaningful for a group of children and youths who have become conservation ambassadors with a determined focus on spreading the message of “Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home”, aimed at protecting penguins and other marine creatures.

With Earth Day and World Penguin Day falling just three days apart, Earth Day at Jurong Bird Park is particularly meaningful for a group of children and youths who have become conservation ambassadors with a determined focus on spreading the message of “Don’t Dump It, Aquatic Creatures Deserve A Clean Home”, aimed at protecting penguins and other marine creatures.

Inviting the public – particularly young children – to join their play date, the students set up craft stations to teach visitors how to make a simple penguin craft out of recyclable toilet rolls, which participants could bring home.

Inviting the public – particularly young children – to join their play date, the students set up craft stations to teach visitors how to make a simple penguin craft out of recyclable toilet rolls, which participants could bring home.

Jurong Bird Park has successfully bred the African and king penguins. Three endangered African penguin chicks have successfully hatched since December 2010, with the latest hatching on 14 March 2013.

Jurong Bird Park has successfully bred the African and king penguins. Three endangered African penguin chicks have successfully hatched since December 2010, with the latest hatching on 14 March 2013.

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