BIRTHDAY SUSPENSE FOR GIANT PANDAS AT RIVER SAFARI

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Giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia celebrate birthdays and third anniversary in Singapore; Changes in Jia Jia’s hormones and behaviours keep caretakers on toes over possible pregnancy

Female panda Jia Jia, who was late for her birthday party, turns seven today. She enjoyed a colourful birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, apples and carrots at River Safari’s Panda Party. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Female panda Jia Jia, who was late for her birthday party, turns seven today. She enjoyed a colourful birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, apples and carrots at River Safari’s Panda Party. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

SINGAPORE, 3 September 2015 – As she quietly celebrated her 7th birthday this morning, River Safari’s female panda Jia Jia continues to keep a little secret which has been keeping vets and keepers on their toes over changes in her behaviours.

In the past two months, panda caretakers have been playing a guessing game on whether the bear is pregnant or going through pseudopregnancy, a common state in which pandas exhibit hormonal and behavioural changes that indicate they are pregnant when they are not.

After the panda underwent artificial insemination on 18 April, caretakers, including a panda specialist from China, have been closely monitoring her behaviours and hormone levels, watching for signs of pregnancy. Since July, Jia Jia has been eating less bamboo, sleeping more, spending more time in her den and her hormone levels are increasing – all signs consistent with pregnancy or pseudopregnancy. Giant pandas commonly display pseudopregnancies and experts worldwide are often not able to determine pandas’ pregnancy status until a late stage.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Under the watchful eyes of our vets and keepers, both Kai Kai and Jia Jia continue to develop well in their Singapore home. Both reached sexual maturity for the first time this year and we are now tracking Jia Jia closely. We hope the data and knowledge gathered from the study of Kai Kai and Jia Jia will add to the global understanding of this endangered species, and contribute to the conservation of giant pandas.”

Vets and keepers have been conducting weekly ultrasound scans to detect a foetus but the results have been inconclusive. Panda caretakers could not detect any foetus based on a recent ultrasound scan on 31 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Vets and keepers have been conducting weekly ultrasound scans to detect a foetus but the results have been inconclusive. Panda caretakers could not detect any foetus based on a recent ultrasound scan on 31 August.
PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Since 23 July, vets and keepers have been conducting weekly ultrasound scans in an attempt to detect a foetus but the results have been inconclusive. The gestation period for a giant panda is typically five months, and the foetus only starts to develop a few weeks before birth.

Dr Serena Oh, Assistant Director of Veterinary Services, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Her behaviours are in line with a rise in progesterone but it is not easy to confirm her pregnancy because the gestation period varies for each panda. Giant pandas have delayed implantation and it is difficult to see the small foetus during ultrasound scans. We can only definitively conclude she is not pregnant once her hormone levels return to normal and she has not delivered, but for now, it is still a guessing game.”

Classified as “endangered” with only 1,600 left in the wild, giant pandas are notoriously difficult to breed. River Safari’s pandas were brought together to mate in April, after vets and keepers had successfully triggered breeding behaviours through controlled lighting and temperature in Giant Panda Forest. As the mating session appeared unsuccessful, Jia Jia was artificially inseminated.

Vets and keepers will continue monitoring Jia Jia’s hormone levels and conduct ultrasound scans. The public can follow Jia Jia’s development via Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s Twitter account (@tweetWRS) with the hashtag #SGPanda.

Jia Jia’s mate, Kai Kai, was also presented with a cake today where he enjoyed the birthday treat in the company of 30 pre-school kids from PCF Zhenghua. The male panda will turn eight on 14 September.

The pandas’ birthdays will be marked with a Panda Party Week from 5 to 13 September, where both bears will receive daily treats as a form of enrichment. In addition, visitors can look forward to interactive booths to learn more about giant pandas, and get hands-on with arts and crafts. Visitors can also enjoy one-for-one promotions on exclusive panda merchandise, as well as panda-licious treats. To mark the pandas’ coming of age, children born in 2007 and 2008 enter River Safari for free in September. Free admission is extended to Singaporeans, permanent residents and long-term visit pass holders.

GET TO KNOW ANIMALS NATIVE TO SINGAPORE AT NIGHT SAFARI THIS SEPTEMBER

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Local visitors enjoy 50% discount on admission from Sundays to Thursdays as part of SG50 celebrations

Night Safari is home to two Sunda slow lorises, a nocturnal and arboreal primate native to Singapore with an extremely slow metabolic rate. Due to its attractive appearance, the slow loris is greatly threatened by the pet trade, even though its bite is known to be venomous. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Night Safari is home to two Sunda slow lorises, a nocturnal and arboreal primate native to Singapore with an extremely slow metabolic rate. Due to its attractive appearance, the slow loris is greatly threatened by the pet trade, even though its bite is known to be venomous. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

25 August 2015, SINGAPORE – As Singapore celebrates her 50th anniversary of independence, take a walk on the wild side at Night Safari and get to know animals native to the island, like the Sunda slow loris, Sunda pangolin, mousedeer, and the elusive wild colugo.

Better known as Sang Kancil in Malay folklore, lesser mousedeer are the world’s smallest hoofed mammal. Look out for them along Night Safari’s Fishing Cat Trail. Mousedeer reach sexual maturity at five to six months, and females have been known to give birth to a single offspring at any time of year. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Better known as Sang Kancil in Malay folklore, lesser mousedeer are the world’s smallest hoofed mammal. Look out for them along Night Safari’s Fishing Cat Trail. Mousedeer reach sexual maturity at five to six months, and females have been known to give birth to a single offspring at any time of year. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “In heavily urbanised Singapore, few people know about our island’s wilder side and the fascinating indigenous species that inhabit our wild places. As we celebrate 50 years of achievements since independence, it is also a good time to appreciate that much of our natural heritage is precious and worthy of our conservation. In Night Safari, one of Singapore’s inventions and gifts to the world, many of these creatures can be observed in comfort and safety. Some of these are part of our collection, some are wild denizens such as the colugos.”

Night Safari has earned the distinction of being the first in the world to exhibit and breed the critically-endangered Sunda pangolin. Three babies have been successfully bred in the park since the exhibit opened in 2009. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Night Safari has earned the distinction of being the first in the world to exhibit and breed the critically-endangered Sunda pangolin. Three babies have been successfully bred in the park since the exhibit opened in 2009. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Zoogeographically, Singapore is part of the Sunda biodiversity hotspot, which means it has a very high number of species and they are found nowhere else in the world. It is imperative to protect native flora and fauna to keep the balance of nature. The more an individual understands the natural world, the stronger the push to safeguard the habitat for future generations. Through the years, Night Safari has helped to protect native species through several initiatives including the Common Palm Civet Project, which started in 2009 to mitigate the escalating human-civet conflict. Night Safari also hosted the ‘Scaling up Pangolin Conservation’ conference in 2013 to map out solutions for the global decline of pangolins.

If a trek through a jungle does not appeal, then traipse down to Night Safari—the world’s first wildlife park created to allow observation of wildlife at night —for a wildly exciting journey to spot, learn and appreciate the denizens of Singapore’s local forests.

Another interesting indigenous species is the Malayan porcupine, which can be found along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail. In Singapore, it has been recently recorded on Pulau Tekong. This prickly rodent is known to rattle its quills when startled or excited. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Another interesting indigenous species is the Malayan porcupine, which can be found along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail. In Singapore, it has been recently recorded on Pulau Tekong. This prickly rodent is known to rattle its quills when startled or excited. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Local residents enjoy 50% admission discounts from Sundays to Thursdays in September. For more information and terms and conditions, visit www.nightsafari.com.sg

FURRIEST AUSTRALIAN TOURISTS PICK SINGAPORE NAMES AHEAD OF SG50

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Koalas Chan, Idalia, Paddle and Pellita choose their Singapore names in time for Golden Jubilee weekend

Singapore, 5 August 2015 – Meet Cantik, Sayang, Nila, and Manja, otherwise known as Chan, Idalia, Paddle and Pellita. Seeking to blend in fully with locals, the koala quartet from Down Under gave their paw of approval and picked their Singapore names in a simple ceremony at Singapore Zoo just days before the nation celebrates her 50th anniversary of independence.

Over 250 suggestions were crowd sourced through a koala nicknaming campaign last month, and eight of the most suitable names were shortlisted. It was then left to the four ladies to pick the one they liked.

The marsupials have become hot favourites with park visitors since their arrival on 13 April this year. The koalas are a gift from Australia to Singapore on the occasion of Singapore’s 50th anniversary of independence, and the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Australia and Singapore.

Chan has chosen Cantik, which means beautiful in Malay and is similar to her original name. This lovely lady with the pink nose is a beauty in her own right. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Chan has chosen Cantik, which means beautiful in Malay and is similar to her original name. This lovely lady with the pink nose is a beauty in her own right. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo’s littlest koala Idalia has decided she’d like to be called Sayang, which means love in Malay, and is often used as a term of endearment for a loved one. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo’s littlest koala Idalia has decided she’d like to be called Sayang, which means love in Malay, and is often used as a term of endearment for a loved one. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Pellita’s choice of a local nickname is Manja, which means affectionate in Malay. Quite an appropriate name for someone who always nuzzles up to her keepers (especially during feeding time!). PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Pellita’s choice of a local nickname is Manja, which means affectionate in Malay. Quite an appropriate name for someone who always nuzzles up to her keepers (especially during feeding time!). PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Being the oldest koala in the group in Singapore Zoo, Paddle has decided to go historical and chose Nila as her nickname. Sang Nila Utama was thought to be the founder of the Kingdom of Singapura in 1299. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Being the oldest koala in the group in Singapore Zoo, Paddle has decided to go historical and chose Nila as her nickname. Sang Nila Utama was thought to be the founder of the Kingdom of Singapura in 1299. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The koalas, together with the rest of the animal and keeper family at Wildlife Reserves Singapore, wish Singapore a Happy 50th Birthday. Majulah Singapura! Click here or on the image below to view a wildly special birthday video:

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

GO WILD FOR SG50!

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Residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo celebrate Jubilee Weekend in true Singapore-style with flags and celebratory songs; local visitors enjoy 50% admission discounts

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

3 August 2015, SINGAPORE – The wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday came from the rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island.

For over four decades, animal residents in the wildlife parks have witnessed Singapore’s growth and development through changing faces of zoo-goers — skipping kids of yesteryears have now returned as parents and grandparents, bulky film cameras have been replaced by palm-sized smartphones, and even paper maps are making way for interactive apps. The open concept exhibits, which were already revolutionary when the Bird Park and Zoo opened in the ‘70s, became enhanced and more immersive.

Today, the animal residents not only hold special places in the hearts of many Singaporeans, they have also drawn crowds from all over the world.

During the Jubilee Weekend, visitors can expect some wild antics from the animals as they pay tribute to the nation:
– In Jurong Bird Park, Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo will fly the Singapore flag high while Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon parrot will sing ‘Happy Birthday’ in the High Flyers Show.

Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon parrot singing a heartfelt rendition of ‘Happy Birthday’ for Singapore. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at Jurong Bird Park’s High Flyers Show at 11am and 3pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon parrot singing a heartfelt rendition of ‘Happy Birthday’ for Singapore. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at Jurong Bird Park’s High Flyers Show at 11am and 3pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

– In Singapore Zoo, the largest residents of the park have perfected the art of flag-raising in the Elephants at Work and Play show, and the sea lions are ready for a little SG50 surprise in the Splash Safari show.

Jati and Gambir, Singapore Zoo’s female Asian elephants, raising the Singapore flag and WRS’ SG50-inspired logo with their trunks as a trumpeting salute to the nation’s 50th birthday. Visitors can catch these giants at the Elephants at Work and Play show at 11.30am and 3.30pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Jati and Gambir, Singapore Zoo’s female Asian elephants, raising the Singapore flag and WRS’ SG50-inspired logo with their trunks as a trumpeting salute to the nation’s 50th birthday. Visitors can catch these giants at the Elephants at Work and Play show at 11.30am and 3.30pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo’s California sea lion proudly waving the Singapore flag at the Splash Safari show to wish everyone a Happy National Day. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at 10.30am and 5pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo’s California sea lion proudly waving the Singapore flag at the Splash Safari show to wish everyone a Happy National Day. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at 10.30am and 5pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

As a treat for local residents, month-long admission discounts are available in August, in addition to the ongoing SG50 promotion for Feather Friends membership at Jurong Bird Park. Local residents enjoy 50% discount on admission at Jurong Bird Park, as well as 50% discount on same-day bundled tickets to River Safari and Singapore Zoo.

During the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August, visitors to Jurong Bird Park, River Safari and Singapore Zoo can also get their hands on a free limited edition SG50 animal-themed tote bag while stocks last.

SG50-Themed Animal Presentations
7 – 10 Aug 2015
Jurong Bird Park
High Flyers Show at Pools Amphitheatre
11.00am & 3.00pm

Singapore Zoo
Elephants at Work and Play at Elephants of Asia
11.30am & 3.30pm
Splash Safari at Shaw Foundation Amphitheatre
10.30am & 5.00pm

SG50 Promotions for Local Residents
Jurong Bird Park
1 – 31 Aug 2015
50% off admission to Jurong Bird Park
Singaporeans, permanent residents and employment pass holders enjoy 50% discount on admission by flashing coupons and proof of identity at Jurong Bird Park ticket counters. Visit www.birdpark.com.sg/ndp50 for more information.

River Safari and Singapore Zoo
1 – 31 Aug 2015
50% off bundled admission to River Safari and Singapore Zoo
Singaporeans, permanent residents and employment pass holders enjoy 50% discount on bundled admission to River Safari and Singapore Zoo. Proof of identity required. Valid for same-day visits only. Visit www.wrs.com.sg/sg50 for more information.

Jurong Bird Park, River Safari and Singapore Zoo
7 – 10 Aug 2015
Free SG50 animal-themed tote bag
Visitors to the three wildlife parks can get their hands on a free SG50 animal-themed woven tote bag (worth $3). Limited to 1 bag per visitor, while stocks last.

Jurong Bird Park
1 Dec 2014 – 31 Dec 2015
SG50 promotion for Feather Friends membership: Enjoy 1 year unlimited entry for the price of a 1 day ticket
For the price of a one day admission ticket, local residents can sign up for a special Feather Friends membership and enjoy unlimited year-round entry to Jurong Bird Park. Local residents can enjoy this special membership at S$28 for adults, and S$18 for children (aged 3 – 12 years) and senior citizens (aged 60 years and above). This on-going promotion was launched in Dec 2014 and will end on 31 Dec 2015. Those interested can sign up at the entrance of Jurong Bird Park, or online at members.wrs.com.sg to skip queues.
Feather Friends Jubilee Special
Receive a special fun pack with every Feather Friends membership sign-up. Promotion valid from 7 to 31 August. Terms and conditions apply.

SINGAPORE ZOO INVITES YOU TO NAME A KOALA!

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Pick Singapore names for koalas ahead of SG50 celebrations;
Participants can win tickets to visit the marsupials in Singapore Zoo

PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore, 16 July 2015Singapore Zoo’s koala quartet is looking to blend in fully with locals ahead of the SG50 Jubilee Weekend with new Singapore names befitting their individual characteristics.

Since their arrival on 13 April this year, the marsupials have settled in nicely in their exhibit in Singapore Zoo’s Australian zone and have effortlessly worked their way into the hearts of park visitors. The koalas are a gift from Australia to Singapore on the occasion of Singapore’s 50th anniversary of independence, and the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Australia and Singapore.

Members of the public are invited to gift the koalas with uniquely Singaporean names based on their characteristics and personalities. Singapore Zoo will conduct one round of short-listing, while the koalas will eventually pick their own names with a paw of approval in a ceremony in August. Details of the naming campaign can be found at http://www.zoo.com.sg/koala-mania.

WRS CALLS FOR CURBS IN ILLEGAL ANIMAL TRADE AFTER RESCUE OF 4000 CRITICALLY ENDGANGERED TURTLES

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Over 4,400 freshwater turtles, among them the critically endangered Palawan forest turtles, were bound to be sent from their native Palawan, in the Philippines, to markets in China when rescuers made the devastating discovery. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Over 4,400 freshwater turtles, among them the critically endangered Palawan forest turtles, were bound to be sent from their native Palawan, in the Philippines, to markets in China when rescuers made the devastating discovery. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Singapore, 8 July 2015 — Over 4,400 freshwater turtles, among them the critically endangered Palawan forest turtles, were bound to be sent from their native Palawan, in the Philippines, to markets in China when rescuers made the devastating discovery.

The animals – including 3,907 Palawan forest turtles, 168 Asian leaf turtles and 25 Southeast Asian box turtles – were handed over to Katala Foundation Inc (KFI), a Philippine wildlife NGO, for safekeeping and rehabilitation. Wildlife Reserves Singapore has for the last three years  provided on-going financial support to the KFI conservation efforts for the Philippine forest turtle, Palawan pangolin and Philippine cockatoo.

Many of the turtles were on the verge of death, or were in bad condition from months of neglect in captivity, showing major symptoms of dehydration as well as severe shell necrosis, ocular lesions and bite wounds. An urgent appeal to the global turtle community was issued to assist these threatened animals.

Among the first rescue team members to arrive in Palawan was Dr Sonja Luz, Director of Conservation and Research, Wildlife Reserves Singapore. Dr Luz, a trained vet, brought medical supplies with her, and collaborated with experts from Hong Kong Ocean Park, Turtle Conservancy and Turtle Survival Alliance in the first days of the crisis. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Among the first rescue team members to arrive in Palawan was Dr Sonja Luz, Director of Conservation and Research, Wildlife Reserves Singapore. Dr Luz, a trained vet, brought medical supplies with her, and collaborated with experts from Hong Kong Ocean Park, Turtle Conservancy and Turtle Survival Alliance in the first days of the crisis. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Among the first rescue team members to arrive in Palawan was Dr Sonja Luz, Director of Conservation and Research, Wildlife Reserves Singapore. WRS immediately committed help with medical supplies and equipment, and a donation of SGD15,000 to fund the rehabilitation process. Dr Luz, a trained vet, brought these supplies with her and, together with international veterinary colleagues from Hong Kong Ocean Park, Turtle Conservancy and Turtle Survival Alliance, attended to the  medical needs of the turtles.

She said, “It was overwhelming in the beginning to be on ground attending to the thousands of turtles struggling for their survival, but the good news is that because of the amazing local and international team efforts, most of these animals could be rehabilitated. To all of us involved, it is frustrating and devastating that the majority of people do not understand how the demand for wild animals and their body parts is driving countless species in this region to extinction. Only if we can stop the demand and stop people from buying products will we have a chance to beat illegal wildlife trade.”

The turtles are believed to have been collected over several months from across their native range of northern Palawan, and were bound for markets in China. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

The turtles are believed to have been collected over several months from across their native range of northern Palawan, and were bound for markets in China. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

The turtles are believed to have been collected over several months from across their native range of northern Palawan, and were bound for markets in China.

Demand for animal skin, meat, and body parts as well as for pets is on the rise with growing affluence and purchasing power, and thousands of animal species like the Palawan freshwater turtle are being driven towards an accelerated extinction. Wildlife Reserves Singapore works closely with like-minded partners such as TRAFFIC to curb illegal wildlife trade, and launched the You Buy They Die campaign in March 2015.

According to reports in the Philippines, authorities have arrested the caretaker of the warehouse in which the turtles were found. The Palawan Council for Sustainable Development enforcers and members of the Provincial Law Enforcement Task Force were preparing to file charges against a Chinese national believed to be the owner of the warehouse.

When making future visits to Wildlife Reserves Singapore parks—Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo—look out for the You Buy They Die interpretive and learn more about what can be done to stop illegal wildlife trade.

WILD WAYS TO BEAT THE HEAT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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Orang utans, hippos and other wild friends share tips on how to stay cool this summer

Singapore, 30 June 2015 — With temperatures soaring this summer, Singapore Zoo’s residents are taking every precaution to beat the heat, and engage in cool practices. Practical advice like wearing sunscreen and novel ways of staying heat-free are given a wild twist, courtesy of our animal friends.

Tip 1: Cover up!  If, like Satria, Singapore Zoo’s Sumatran orang utan, you just can’t bear to leave your coat at home, employ an equally fashionable gunny sack to seek refuge from the scorching sun. For human visitors, a scarf or an umbrella will work just as well. And don’t forget the sunglasses!  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 1: Cover up!
If, like Satria, Singapore Zoo’s Sumatran orang utan, you just can’t bear to leave your coat at home, employ an equally fashionable gunny sack to seek refuge from the scorching sun. For human visitors, a scarf or an umbrella will work just as well. And don’t forget the sunglasses!
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 2: Make a splash!  Omar, Singapore Zoo’s white tiger, does it the simplest way – by spending the day creating big splashes in his pool. Not only will sloshing about in the water keep you cool, we hear it’s rather therapeutic as well.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 2: Make a splash!
Omar, Singapore Zoo’s white tiger, does it the simplest way – by spending the day creating big splashes in his pool. Not only will sloshing about in the water keep you cool, we hear it’s rather therapeutic as well.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 3: Slather on sunscreen (like it’s free) Bora, our white rhinoceros, says there’s nothing better than sloshing in some glorious mud to stay cool and keep away sunburns (and parasites!). Human friends, even if the sun’s behind the clouds, apply generous amounts of sunscreen to protect your skin from UV rays when exploring Singapore Zoo.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 3: Slather on sunscreen (like it’s free)
Bora, our white rhinoceros, says there’s nothing better than sloshing in some glorious mud to stay cool and keep away sunburns (and parasites!). Human friends, even if the sun’s behind the clouds, apply generous amounts of sunscreen to protect your skin from UV rays when exploring Singapore Zoo.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 4: Share a popsicle  Singapore Zoo’s Asian elephant Jati’s got her trunk wrapped around a mammoth popsicle – a perfect and fun antidote for soaring temperatures. And it looks like Gambir wants a piece of the action too! Share an ice cream or icy slush with your friends today.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 4: Share a popsicle
Singapore Zoo’s Asian elephant Jati’s got her trunk wrapped around a mammoth popsicle – a perfect and fun antidote for soaring temperatures. And it looks like Gambir wants a piece of the action too! Share an ice cream or icy slush with your friends today.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 5: Keep your head under water Singapore Zoo’s pair of pygmy hippopotamus has the right idea; follow their lead and submerge yourself in a pool of cool water to escape the mugginess. Hippos have been known to stay underwater for up to six minutes!  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 5: Keep your head under water
Singapore Zoo’s pair of pygmy hippopotamus has the right idea; follow their lead and submerge yourself in a pool of cool water to escape the mugginess. Hippos have been known to stay underwater for up to six minutes!
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 6: If all else fails, wait it out (or move to Night Safari!) Instead of fighting the heat, Night Safari’s pride of Asiatic lions prefers to wait till twilight before indulging in their daily activities. In fact, 90 per cent of tropical species come out at night when it's cooler. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 6: If all else fails, wait it out (or move to Night Safari!)
Instead of fighting the heat, Night Safari’s pride of Asiatic lions prefers to wait till twilight before indulging in their daily activities. In fact, 90 per cent of tropical species come out at night when it’s cooler.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

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