WILD WAYS TO BEAT THE HEAT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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Orang utans, hippos and other wild friends share tips on how to stay cool this summer

Singapore, 30 June 2015 — With temperatures soaring this summer, Singapore Zoo’s residents are taking every precaution to beat the heat, and engage in cool practices. Practical advice like wearing sunscreen and novel ways of staying heat-free are given a wild twist, courtesy of our animal friends.

Tip 1: Cover up!  If, like Satria, Singapore Zoo’s Sumatran orang utan, you just can’t bear to leave your coat at home, employ an equally fashionable gunny sack to seek refuge from the scorching sun. For human visitors, a scarf or an umbrella will work just as well. And don’t forget the sunglasses!  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 1: Cover up!
If, like Satria, Singapore Zoo’s Sumatran orang utan, you just can’t bear to leave your coat at home, employ an equally fashionable gunny sack to seek refuge from the scorching sun. For human visitors, a scarf or an umbrella will work just as well. And don’t forget the sunglasses!
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 2: Make a splash!  Omar, Singapore Zoo’s white tiger, does it the simplest way – by spending the day creating big splashes in his pool. Not only will sloshing about in the water keep you cool, we hear it’s rather therapeutic as well.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 2: Make a splash!
Omar, Singapore Zoo’s white tiger, does it the simplest way – by spending the day creating big splashes in his pool. Not only will sloshing about in the water keep you cool, we hear it’s rather therapeutic as well.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 3: Slather on sunscreen (like it’s free) Bora, our white rhinoceros, says there’s nothing better than sloshing in some glorious mud to stay cool and keep away sunburns (and parasites!). Human friends, even if the sun’s behind the clouds, apply generous amounts of sunscreen to protect your skin from UV rays when exploring Singapore Zoo.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 3: Slather on sunscreen (like it’s free)
Bora, our white rhinoceros, says there’s nothing better than sloshing in some glorious mud to stay cool and keep away sunburns (and parasites!). Human friends, even if the sun’s behind the clouds, apply generous amounts of sunscreen to protect your skin from UV rays when exploring Singapore Zoo.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 4: Share a popsicle  Singapore Zoo’s Asian elephant Jati’s got her trunk wrapped around a mammoth popsicle – a perfect and fun antidote for soaring temperatures. And it looks like Gambir wants a piece of the action too! Share an ice cream or icy slush with your friends today.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 4: Share a popsicle
Singapore Zoo’s Asian elephant Jati’s got her trunk wrapped around a mammoth popsicle – a perfect and fun antidote for soaring temperatures. And it looks like Gambir wants a piece of the action too! Share an ice cream or icy slush with your friends today.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 5: Keep your head under water Singapore Zoo’s pair of pygmy hippopotamus has the right idea; follow their lead and submerge yourself in a pool of cool water to escape the mugginess. Hippos have been known to stay underwater for up to six minutes!  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 5: Keep your head under water
Singapore Zoo’s pair of pygmy hippopotamus has the right idea; follow their lead and submerge yourself in a pool of cool water to escape the mugginess. Hippos have been known to stay underwater for up to six minutes!
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 6: If all else fails, wait it out (or move to Night Safari!) Instead of fighting the heat, Night Safari’s pride of Asiatic lions prefers to wait till twilight before indulging in their daily activities. In fact, 90 per cent of tropical species come out at night when it's cooler. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 6: If all else fails, wait it out (or move to Night Safari!)
Instead of fighting the heat, Night Safari’s pride of Asiatic lions prefers to wait till twilight before indulging in their daily activities. In fact, 90 per cent of tropical species come out at night when it’s cooler.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

INDIGENOUS ANIMALS FEATURED IN “BIODIVERSITY IS US” PROJECT

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WRS creates localised version of global biodiversity campaign; Sunda pangolin, oriental pied hornbill among animals featured

Wildlife Reserves Singapore head vet Dr Serena Oh gives her daughter Megan a piggy back ride, much like how mother pangolins cart their young around, in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project with a series of photos that depicts how humans and animals are closely connected. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wildlife Reserves Singapore head vet Dr Serena Oh gives her daughter Megan a piggy back ride, much like how mother pangolins cart their young around, in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project with a series of photos that depicts how humans and animals are closely connected. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 27 June 2015 — Indigenous animals that live in the tropical rainforests, mangroves or coral ecosystems of Singapore take center stage in Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, with a series of photos that depicts how humans and animals are closely connected.

Featuring Singapore’s fauna like the critically endangered Sunda pangolin, oriental-pied hornbill, tokay gecko, crab-eating macaques and knobbly sea stars, the project serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions that individuals can do to protect it.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation & Research Manager Jessica Lee displays how humans and oriental pied hornbills are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation & Research Manager Jessica Lee displays how humans and oriental pied hornbills are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Visitors to the Festival of Biodiversity on 27 and 28 June at Vivocity can visit the Wildlife Reserves Singapore booth to learn more about Biodiversity is Us, and have their pictures taken for their own Biodiversity is Us e-poster. The public can also download the free Biodiversity is Us app to learn about 400 animal species, take part in games and quizzes, build animal checklists and more.

Singapore Zoo’s Deputy Head reptile keeper Jose Pedro Cairos displays how humans and tokay geckos are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo’s Deputy Head reptile keeper Jose Pedro Cairos displays how humans and tokay geckos are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Biodiversity is Us is initiated by the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums, and supports the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011–2020 by providing tools for raising awareness about biodiversity.