DEBUNKING MYTHS ON SPOOKTACULAR ANIMALS

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Creatures of Night Safari join forces to address fables surrounding their dark nature

SINGAPORE, 29 October 2015 — Some creatures in the animal kingdom are associated with myths that leave them with bad reputations. Thoughts of bats, wolves and hyenas often conjure up images of the supernatural world, and give people the shivers! Night Safari’s residents shed light on the truths behind some of these urban legends.

Hyenas are often thought of as lazy scavengers. While they do feed on carrion and scraps left behind by more glamorous predators like lions, they are actually excellent hunters. Relying on endurance, hyenas chase prey over long distances until it is winded, before closing in for the kill. They have one of the greatest bite forces in the animal kingdom and are even capable of bringing down prey over three times their own weight. Look out for Night Safari’s striped and spotted hyenas (pictured above) during the tram experience. The latter, otherwise known as the laughing hyena for its maniacal vocalisation when frustrated, can also be seen along the East Lodge walking trail.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Hyenas are often thought of as lazy scavengers. While they do feed on carrion and scraps left behind by more glamorous predators like lions, they are actually excellent hunters. Relying on endurance, hyenas chase prey over long distances until it is winded, before closing in for the kill. They have one of the greatest bite forces in the animal kingdom and are even capable of bringing down prey over three times their own weight. Look out for Night Safari’s striped and spotted hyenas (pictured above) during the tram experience. The latter, otherwise known as the laughing hyena for its maniacal vocalisation when frustrated, can also be seen along the East Lodge walking trail.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While some cultures associate these nocturnal raptors with witchcraft, sorcery and even death, there are others who believe owls represent wisdom and intelligence. Contrary to popular belief, owls cannot rotate their heads a complete circle. With 14 neck vertebrae, compared to only seven in humans, owls can rotate their heads by 270 degrees in either direction. Equipped with specialised soft-edged flight feathers, even the largest and heaviest of owls, like Night Safari’s Eurasian eagle owl, is capable of flying silently thorough the night sky to swoop down on unsuspecting rodents — an ability that accentuates the mystical aura surrounding them. Marvel at this winged predator along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail.   PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While some cultures associate these nocturnal raptors with witchcraft, sorcery and even death, there are others who believe owls represent wisdom and intelligence. Contrary to popular belief, owls cannot rotate their heads a complete circle. With 14 neck vertebrae, compared to only seven in humans, owls can rotate their heads by 270 degrees in either direction. Equipped with specialised soft-edged flight feathers, even the largest and heaviest of owls, like Night Safari’s Eurasian eagle owl, is capable of flying silently thorough the night sky to swoop down on unsuspecting rodents — an ability that accentuates the mystical aura surrounding them. Marvel at this winged predator along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

It is commonly thought that a porcupine is able to shoot its quills at its predator. While these large, prickly rodents do rely on their quills to protect themselves when threatened, they merely rattle their quills as a first warning. If the hapless predator does not get the hint, the porcupine will erect its quills and ram backwards at its attacker, leaving the latter with a muzzle full of dislodged quills for its trouble. This easily dislodged quills may have given rise to the myth that the quills can be launched from a distance. Encounter two species of these fascinating rodents along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail—the Malayan and Indian-crested porcupines.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

It is commonly thought that a porcupine is able to shoot its quills at its predator. While these large, prickly rodents do rely on their quills to protect themselves when threatened, they merely rattle their quills as a first warning. If the hapless predator does not get the hint, the porcupine will erect its quills and ram backwards at its attacker, leaving the latter with a muzzle full of dislodged quills for its trouble. This easily dislodged quills may have given rise to the myth that the quills can be launched from a distance. Encounter two species of these fascinating rodents along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail—the Malayan and Indian-crested porcupines.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

No thanks to their inverted hanging ways and the misconception that blood is part of their diet, bats are often associated with vampires. In reality, only a small percentage — just three out of over a thousand of the species — actually consume blood. Fruit bats, like Night Safari’s Malayan flying foxes, keep the ecosystem running like clockwork, by contributing to rainforest regrowth through seed dispersal and pollination, which in turn results in hundreds of commercial products and medicines. Bat guano is also known to be a great fertiliser! Walk through Night Safari’s Mangrove Walk for a closer look at these intriguing winged mammals.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

No thanks to their inverted hanging ways and the misconception that blood is part of their diet, bats are often associated with vampires. In reality, only a small percentage — just three out of over a thousand of the species — actually consume blood. Fruit bats, like Night Safari’s Malayan flying foxes, keep the ecosystem running like clockwork, by contributing to rainforest regrowth through seed dispersal and pollination, which in turn results in hundreds of commercial products and medicines. Bat guano is also known to be a great fertiliser! Walk through Night Safari’s Mangrove Walk for a closer look at these intriguing winged mammals.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wolf imagery is abound in mythology and folklore, and one of the first that comes to mind is the legend of the werewolf. While werewolves are synonymous with shape-shifting, a hulking physique and dense fur coat, Night Safari’s Indian wolf is smaller in stature with a short coat and no shape-shifting abilities, although its fur colouration does help it blend with its surroundings! The only thing the Indian wolf has in common with the famed werewolf is its haunting howl, a vocalization to defend their territory and rally the pack. Don’t miss these elusive creatures on Night Safari’s tram experience. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES      SINGAPORE

Wolf imagery is abound in mythology and folklore, and one of the first that comes to mind is the legend of the werewolf. While werewolves are synonymous with shape-shifting, a hulking physique and dense fur coat, Night Safari’s Indian wolf is smaller in stature with a short coat and no shape-shifting abilities, although its fur colouration does help it blend with its surroundings! The only thing the Indian wolf has in common with the famed werewolf is its haunting howl, a vocalization to defend their territory and rally the pack. Don’t miss these elusive creatures on Night Safari’s tram experience.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

BE WHISKED AWAY BY FAIRY TALE MAGIC AT SAFARI BOO

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River Safari’s trick or treat event returns with new live-action performances, free admission for kids and an enchanting night with fairy tale characters

SINGAPORE, 8 October 2015 – Dress up the kids in costume ball finery for the cutest trick or treat event in town, and be mesmerised as little ones dance and mingle with fairy tale characters at River Safari’s annual Safari Boo this October.

Back for the second year, Safari Boo 2015 will see River Safari transformed into a fantastical wonderland where kids can go trick-or-treating, discover river monsters at twilight and enjoy two specially themed presentations, among other festivities. Children aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm* on event nights.

Ms Isabel Cheng, Chief Marketing Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Safari Boo’s merry-not-scary proposition provides an opportunity for families and children to have trick or treat fun without the fright, and gives little ones and adults a chance to play make-believe and dress creatively. We are thrilled by the strong turnout during its launch last year, and look forward to welcoming more visitors this year with more characters, interactive discovery stations, performances and animal encounters for an educational and fun night.”

Safari Boo 2015 features two all-new shows titled Furry Tales and Be My Guests Royal Ball. Furry Tales puts a twist on familiar tales such as Snow White and Puss in Boots. Animal superstars will thrill audiences with their natural behaviours and friendly characters will showcase creatures such as the slithery snake and owl, and debunk the myths surrounding them. For fun fairy tale pageantry, join Fairy Godmother at Be My Guests Royal Ball where the best dressed will be crowned in this music-filled spectacle for kids.

More than 150 visitors, including costume-clad kids from Tao Nan School, Zhangde Primary School and Between Two Trees Preschool attended a special preview of River Safari’s annual Safari Boo on 7 October 2015. In addition to trick or treat trails and fairy tale characters such as Geppetto and Pinocchio (above), Safari Boo 2015 features interactive discovery stations and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm.

More than 150 visitors, including costume-clad kids from Tao Nan School, Zhangde Primary School and Between Two Trees Preschool attended a special preview of River Safari’s annual Safari Boo on 7 October 2015. In addition to trick or treat trails and fairy tale characters such as Geppetto and Pinocchio (above), Safari Boo 2015 features interactive discovery stations and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm. Photo by: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

As part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November, visitors can come up-close with animals such as the ball python and great white pelican in a special animal presentation titled Furry Tales.  Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

As part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November, visitors can come up-close with animals such as the ball python and great white pelican in a special animal presentation titled Furry Tales. Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Learn how animals navigate the woods at night in Hansel & Gretel’s House of Fun and have a scaly encounter with the green iguana (above) at the Friends of the Sea Trick or Treat Trail. Back for the second year, Safari Boo 2015 features a line-up of adorable fairy tale characters, two all-new shows and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm. Photo by: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Learn how animals navigate the woods at night in Hansel & Gretel’s House of Fun and have a scaly encounter with the green iguana (above) at the Friends of the Sea Trick or Treat Trail. Back for the second year, Safari Boo 2015 features a line-up of adorable fairy tale characters, two all-new shows and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm. Photo by: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

RIVER SAFARI SPRINGS SAFARI BOO CHILDREN’S DAY SURPRISE

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Safari Boo characters go to school to spread joy and trick-or-treat fun to over 60 kids from the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS)

More than 60 kids from the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) – Woodlands Gardens School were presented with an early trick-or-treat surprise in school on 1 October, with their school hall transformed with colourful livery and a burst of prancing fairy tale characters from River Safari’s Safari Boo. Held on the last two weekends in October, Safari Boo is River Safari’s merry-not-scary event for kids where families and kids can enjoy trick-or-treat trails, interactive discovery stations, special animal presentations and up-close encounters with river monsters at night. Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

More than 60 kids from the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) – Woodlands Gardens School were presented with an early trick-or-treat surprise in school on 1 October, with their school hall transformed with colourful livery and a burst of prancing fairy tale characters from River Safari’s Safari Boo. Held on the last two weekends in October, Safari Boo is River Safari’s merry-not-scary event for kids where families and kids can enjoy trick-or-treat trails, interactive discovery stations, special animal presentations and up-close encounters with river monsters at night. Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

SINGAPORE, 1 October 2015 – Ahead of Children’s Day, more than 60 kids from the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) – Woodlands Gardens School were presented with an early trick-or-treat surprise in school this morning. Instead of the usual school assembly, the kids entered a hall splashed with colourful livery and a burst of prancing fairy tale characters from River Safari’s Safari Boo.

Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

The kids also got an opportunity to play make-believe and dress up in fancy costumes, with a little help from the Safari Boo crew. Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Back for its second year after strong turnout in 2014, the merry-not-scary Safari Boo event will see River Safari transformed into a fantastical wonderland where kids will meet adorable fairy tale characters, go through a journey of wildlife discovery featuring trick-or-treat stations and enjoy two themed presentations, among other programmes.

Held on 23, 24, 25, 30, 31 Oct and 1 Nov, this year’s fairy tale theme will feature a line-up of fantastical characters from Pinocchio to the Little Mermaid. Children aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm. More information can be found on www.safariboo.sg

Children’s Day came early to the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) – Woodlands Gardens School when River Safari brought Safari Boo to the school with opportunities for students to dress up, get their faces painted, and a live performance by Safari Boo characters. Held on the last two weekends in October, Safari Boo is River Safari’s merry-not-scary event for kids where families and kids can enjoy trick-or-treat trails, interactive discovery stations, special animal presentations and up-close encounters with river monsters at night. Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Children’s Day came early to the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) – Woodlands Gardens School when River Safari brought Safari Boo to the school with opportunities for students to dress up, get their faces painted, and a live performance by Safari Boo characters. Held on the last two weekends in October, Safari Boo is River Safari’s merry-not-scary event for kids where families and kids can enjoy trick-or-treat trails, interactive discovery stations, special animal presentations and up-close encounters with river monsters at night. Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.