BABY ELEPHANT JOY FOR NIGHT SAFARI’S 22ND ANNIVERSARY

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149kg baby arrives a fortnight before award-winning park’s birthday;
First elephant calf in 6 years was born in the exhibit

Image 1_NS baby ele in exhibit_WRS

Image 1: Night Safari welcomed the latest addition to the elephant herd on 12 May 2016, a fortnight ahead of the award-winning park’s 22nd anniversary. The female calf, which weighed 149kg at birth, is the offspring of 39-year-old Chawang and 30-year-old Sri Nandong. Night Safari visitors can witness the close bond between mother and baby at the Asian elephant exhibit from late June onwards. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE, 31 May 2016Night Safari received a gigantic early birthday surprise this year, in the form of a 149kg female baby Asian elephant on 12 May 2016. The big bundle of joy arrived 14 days ahead of the award-winning park’s 22nd anniversary, which falls on 26 May 2016.

Sri Nandong, Night Safari’s 30-year-old female Asian elephant, surprised her animal carers when she gave birth to the bouncy calf in the elephant exhibit during operation hours. Keepers had been aware that she was pregnant but did not expect the baby to arrive so soon. An elephant’s gestation period usually lasts between 22-24 months, making it the longest pregnancy in the animal kingdom.

The latest addition to the herd is the park’s first elephant birth in six years. The calf has gained 43kg since birth, and now weighs a hefty 192kg. The gentle yet inquisitive calf was sired by 39-year-old Chawang, the Asian bull elephant at Night Safari. With this birth, Night Safari is now home to four female and two male elephants.

Visitors can witness the close bond between mother and baby at the Asian elephant exhibit from late June onwards. For now, the as yet unnamed calf enjoys her time getting to know her elephant ‘aunties’ Jamilah and Tun, frolicking in her little play pool and going for short walks to get used to her surrounds.

Image 2_NS baby ele bathing_WRS

Image 2: Night Safari’s elephant herd welcomed a baby on 12 May 2016. Visitors can witness the close bond between mother and baby at the Asian elephant exhibit from late June onwards. For now, the as yet unnamed calf enjoys her time getting to know her elephant ‘aunties’ Jamilah and Tun, frolicking in her little play pool and going for short walks to get used to her surrounds. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

 

Image 3_NS baby ele in exhibit_WRS

Image 3: Night Safari’s 30 year old female elephant Sri Nandong, introduces her calf to napier grass. The calf, which was born on 12 May 2016, still relies mainly on her mother’s milk, but is starting to use her trunk to explore solid food. Visitors wanting to see the calf will need to be patient as she will only be out in the exhibit from late June onwards. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

ABANDONED CRITICALLY ENDANGERED BABY PANGOLIN SUCCESSFULLY HAND-RAISED AT NIGHT SAFARI

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Pangolin baby had 50 per cent chance of survival under human care;
Guests can find out more about the elusive creature at park’s upcoming keeper interaction programme

IMAGE 1 (left): Found weak, hungry, and wandering alone at Upper Thomson Road on 22 February this year, the abandoned critically endangered Sunda pangolin was taken to Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s rescued wildlife centre where vets made a desperate attempt to hand-raise him. To encourage his natural behaviour, the baby pangolin is taken for walks every morning and evening. Foraging exercises the critically endangered animal’s keen sense of smell and strong claws.

IMAGE 2 (right): The abandoned baby pangolin was bottle-fed kitten milk replacer (KMR), a substitute for his mother’s milk, before being introduced to ants’ eggs, which he now relishes. Eventually, the pangolin will progress to the captive diet, a protein-rich formula which includes minced beef, ants’ eggs, mealworms and insectivore supplements.

PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE, 7 April 2016 — Hungrily lapping up ants’ eggs, vigorously burrowing around his play tub and stubbornly clinging on to his caretaker’s arm despite being coaxed off—all heartening signs that the abandoned critically endangered baby Sunda pangolin was flourishing under the doting care of his human foster parents. This was a cause for celebration, for the robust creature today is a far cry from the wisp he had been weeks before.

Found weak, hungry, and wandering alone at Upper Thomson Road on 22 February, the four-month old pangolin was taken to Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s (WRS) rescued wildlife centre where vets made a desperate attempt to hand-raise him—a mammoth task as the delicate species generally does not thrive under human care.

The first and biggest challenge was his diet. While healthy, the baby rejected kitten milk replacer (KMR) as he was used to his mother’s milk. In addition, the scaly anteater was at a crucial point in his life of weaning off milk onto solid food, a diet of ants and termites. This change in diet caused intestinal issues and vets had to provide 24 hour care to the precious, critically endangered baby.

After a precarious one and a half week period, the pangolin proved resilient. He started drinking KMR four times a day and now relishes ants’ eggs. His milk intake has been reduced to twice daily and he is being eased into a specialised diet which the adult pangolins at Night Safari take.

Apart from diet, to encourage his natural behaviour, the baby pangolin is taken for walks every morning and evening on forested grounds. Foraging exercises the critically endangered animal’s keen sense of smell and strong claws.

Having grown from 776g to 1.1kg, the young pangolin’s makeshift quarters was upgraded to accommodate his growth. He now resides in the veterinary ward with a roomy tub for play and rest, complete with a large branch to climb on. When fully grown, a male Sunda pangolin can weigh up to 7.5kg.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore said, “Successfully raising a Sunda pangolin from such a young age is a real achievement. This critically endangered species has notoriously low survival rates under human care, and this experience has given us invaluable knowledge on how to care for the species.”

Once the baby pangolin is independent and graduates to the captive diet, he will join the seven Sunda pangolins at Night Safari’s Fishing Cat Trail, two of which were born under human care. Night Safari opened the world’s first Sunda pangolin exhibit in 2009.

The Sunda pangolin is listed as Critically Endangered in the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species. Globally, all eight species of pangolins are threatened with extinction as a result of unsustainable illegal trade to supply human consumption and traditional medicine in East Asia. In Singapore, the Sunda pangolin is threatened with habitat loss and motor vehicle accidents. WRS is funding ecological and genetic studies of this species whose natural history is not well understood.

As part of WRS’ efforts to highlight the plight of this dwindling species, Night Safari will begin its new keeper interaction cum feeding programme in mid-May. During the session, a keeper will educate visitors on the pangolin’s history and situation in the wild while pangolin feeding takes place in the exhibit. Due to their secretive nature, few know about the world’s only scaly mammal, so the session will provide rare insights of this creature’s natural behaviour, such as climbing trees and foraging for food.

*IUCN stands for International Union for Conservation of NatureImage 3_Baby pangolin climbs tree_WRS

 IMAGE 3 (left): Learning to climb trees exercises the tree-dwelling Sunda pangolin’s strong claws and semi-prehensile tail (tails which are capable of grasping), which it uses to grip bark and scale trees. Having grown bigger and stronger, he has taken to wrapping his tail around his caregiver’s arm, unwilling to let go.

PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

 

 

 

 

Image 4_Snoozing baby pangolin_WRS

 

 

 

IMAGE 4 (left): The baby pangolin curls up as he snoozes soundly. He only learnt to curl fully on 3 March 2016, as pictured. Curling up into a tight ball is the pangolin’s best defense against predators but ironically its worst defense against human beings, as it allows poachers to easily pick it up and toss it into a bag.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Image 5_Baby pangolin eats ants eggs_WRS

IMAGE 5 (left): The pangolin’s caregivers add his favourite ants’ eggs to the captive diet to encourage him to take it, but the sneaky baby would pick out just the ants’ eggs and leave the rest untouched.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

 

SCALING UP CONSERVATION EFFORTS FOR SUNDA PANGOLINS ON WORLD PANGOLIN DAY

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Night Safari Singapore is home to the world’s first conservation breeding programme
for Sunda pangolins; Experts gather to discuss species conservation efforts

Image 1 (left): Sunda pangolin babies hitch a ride on mom’s tail when they are young. Not much is known about these elusive creatures but Night Safari intends to change that by supporting several projects to learn more about the behaviour and ecology of the world’s only scaly mammal.

Image 2 (right): When threatened, pangolins curl into a ball, making them easy targets for poachers. In the past 10 years alone, it is believed that more than one million pangolins have been illegally traded.
PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE, 18 February 2016Night Safari is scaling up on efforts to save the world’s most heavily trafficked mammal from extinction, through a number of pangolin conservation and research programmes.

The global trade of pangolins has reached epic proportions and it is believed that more than one million have been traded illegally in the past decade alone. International trade is largely driven by demand in China and Vietnam where pangolins are considered a delicacy and poached extensively for their scales, meat and skin for use in traditional medicine.

World Pangolin Day, which is celebrated on 20 February 2016, aims to raise awareness on the plight of these scaly mammals which are poached more than elephants and rhinos combined. Organised in conjunction with World Pangolin Day, a group of dedicated pangolin conservationists met with the Wildlife Reserve Singapore (WRS) Conservation & Research team in Singapore this week (Tuesday, 16 February 2016) to review the ongoing research efforts for Singapore’s remaining pangolins.

Through its conservation fund, WRS is supporting a number of projects which include tracking pangolins in the wild with radio and GPS tags and training conservation sniffer dogs to help with local and regional field efforts for wild pangolins.

In addition, Night Safari is home to the world’s first conservation breeding programme for the Sunda pangolin which is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species. It currently houses seven Sunda pangolins in its protection, two of which were born under human care.

Dr Sonja Luz, Director of Conservation & Research, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “The plight facing pangolins is devastating and if we want to win the battle against the illegal wildlife trade, we must educate people and inspire compassion and respect for nature and animals. At WRS, we have made this our mission, and we have the unique opportunity to study and learn more about this elusive animal right at our doorstep.”

She added, “Our local research and conservation efforts contribute to a better understanding of the biology and urban ecology of pangolins. Through our captive breeding efforts, we are able to raise more awareness about the amazing creatures.”
A Singapore pangolin working group consisting local stakeholders has also been formed to gather feedback on outreach and research activities to maximise conservation efforts.

Image 3_Pangolin Book _WRS (smaller)To further reach out to children, WRS has published a book titled ‘Why did the pangolin cross the road?’ (left). This illustrated anecdote is inspired by one of the seven pangolins in Night Safari’s collection, and features English and Mandarin texts.

On World Pangolin Day, Night Safari has lined up two special sessions of Keeper Talks where visitors will have the opportunity to get up close with the park’s Sunda pangolin. The pangolins can be found on the Fishing Cat Trail at Night Safari.

ANIMAL RESIDENTS ENJOY FESTIVE TREATS TO USHER IN YEAR OF THE MONKEY

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Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo roll out enrichment goodies
for wild residents from 6 to 9 Feb 2016

SINGAPORE, 22 January 2016 – The wild residents at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo are ready to swing into the Year of the Monkey with festive enrichment treats specially created by doting keepers. From 6 to 9 February 2016, guests at the four wildlife parks can catch the amusing antics of animals, including a singing parrot wishing everyone “Gong Xi Fa Cai” and giant pandas enjoying their favourite food from larger-than-life ang pows.

For some serious monkey business, head down to Singapore Zoo which is home to over 30 monkey species. Some of the world’s rarest monkeys like the cotton-top tamarin, Javan langur and golden-headed lion tamarin will receive festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. As the monkeys chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights such as oranges, nuts and seeds, guests can marvel at their nimble and agile movements, adore their stunning features, or just snap away for a photo memory.

Other festivities across the four wildlife parks include acrobatic lion dance performances, meet and greet sessions with God of Fortune and Fu Lu Shou mascots, and a Zoodiac trail for guests to discover their fortune forecast in the Year of the Monkey.

CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 1  CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 1-2: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of palm-sized monkeys such as the endangered golden-headed lion tamarins as they chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 1   CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 3-4: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of monkeys such as the threatened Javan langur enjoying festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

ACTIVITIES AT A GLANCECNY Table.jpg

 

For more information, visit wildcny.sg

 

NIGHT SAFARI’S MYSTICA ENCHANTS WITH MAGICAL LIGHTS AND PERFORMANCES

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Visitors can enjoy illuminating dreamscapes now until 12 December

Image 1 - NS - Mystica

IMAGE 1: Night Safari is transformed into the enchanting world of Mystica this December, with sparkling lights set to illuminate the nocturnal landscape. Twilight guardians dazzle with spellbinding performances thrice nightly. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 1 December 2015 – Guests drew gasps of awe as twilight guardians expertly twirled magical lights for the annual Night Safari Mystica spectacle. This year’s instalment of Mystica promises a glittering world of enchanting lights and dazzling colours. Twilight guardians harness light rays to give a spellbinding performance thrice daily, while crowd favourites the Thumbuakar warriors put up a glow-in-the-dark rendition of their ceremonial moves and fire-eating displays. The park’s animal residents also jump in on the action, with sparkly enrichment activities to excite their nights.

Details

Dates:     4, 5, 11, 12 Dec (Fri and Sat)
Venue:    Night Safari
80 Mandai Lake Road
Singapore 729826
Fee:        Festivities at the entrance are free but usual admission of $42 (adult) and $28 (child 3-12 years) applies for those entering the park
Note:      Purchase tickets online to check available timeslots and skip the queue, and enjoy up to 15% discount on admission

For more details, visit www.nightsafari.com.sg

Image 2 - NS - Mystica

IMAGE 2: Enchanting lights await guests to Night Safari’s Mystica event this year, where they can watch spellbinding performances by twilight guardians as they harness magical light rays. Other highlights include the Thumbuakar warriors’ glow-in-the-dark rendition of ceremonial displays and fire-eating prowess. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Image 3 - NS - Mystica

IMAGE 3: Thumbuakar warriors rope in an enthusiastic visitor during their special glow-in-the-dark performance at Night Safari’s Mystica. Guests can also look forward to other spellbinding performances by Mystica’s twilight guardians, and special sparkly enrinchment sessions for the animals. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

 

 

 

DEBUNKING MYTHS ON SPOOKTACULAR ANIMALS

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Creatures of Night Safari join forces to address fables surrounding their dark nature

SINGAPORE, 29 October 2015 — Some creatures in the animal kingdom are associated with myths that leave them with bad reputations. Thoughts of bats, wolves and hyenas often conjure up images of the supernatural world, and give people the shivers! Night Safari’s residents shed light on the truths behind some of these urban legends.

Hyenas are often thought of as lazy scavengers. While they do feed on carrion and scraps left behind by more glamorous predators like lions, they are actually excellent hunters. Relying on endurance, hyenas chase prey over long distances until it is winded, before closing in for the kill. They have one of the greatest bite forces in the animal kingdom and are even capable of bringing down prey over three times their own weight. Look out for Night Safari’s striped and spotted hyenas (pictured above) during the tram experience. The latter, otherwise known as the laughing hyena for its maniacal vocalisation when frustrated, can also be seen along the East Lodge walking trail.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Hyenas are often thought of as lazy scavengers. While they do feed on carrion and scraps left behind by more glamorous predators like lions, they are actually excellent hunters. Relying on endurance, hyenas chase prey over long distances until it is winded, before closing in for the kill. They have one of the greatest bite forces in the animal kingdom and are even capable of bringing down prey over three times their own weight. Look out for Night Safari’s striped and spotted hyenas (pictured above) during the tram experience. The latter, otherwise known as the laughing hyena for its maniacal vocalisation when frustrated, can also be seen along the East Lodge walking trail.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While some cultures associate these nocturnal raptors with witchcraft, sorcery and even death, there are others who believe owls represent wisdom and intelligence. Contrary to popular belief, owls cannot rotate their heads a complete circle. With 14 neck vertebrae, compared to only seven in humans, owls can rotate their heads by 270 degrees in either direction. Equipped with specialised soft-edged flight feathers, even the largest and heaviest of owls, like Night Safari’s Eurasian eagle owl, is capable of flying silently thorough the night sky to swoop down on unsuspecting rodents — an ability that accentuates the mystical aura surrounding them. Marvel at this winged predator along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail.   PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While some cultures associate these nocturnal raptors with witchcraft, sorcery and even death, there are others who believe owls represent wisdom and intelligence. Contrary to popular belief, owls cannot rotate their heads a complete circle. With 14 neck vertebrae, compared to only seven in humans, owls can rotate their heads by 270 degrees in either direction. Equipped with specialised soft-edged flight feathers, even the largest and heaviest of owls, like Night Safari’s Eurasian eagle owl, is capable of flying silently thorough the night sky to swoop down on unsuspecting rodents — an ability that accentuates the mystical aura surrounding them. Marvel at this winged predator along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

It is commonly thought that a porcupine is able to shoot its quills at its predator. While these large, prickly rodents do rely on their quills to protect themselves when threatened, they merely rattle their quills as a first warning. If the hapless predator does not get the hint, the porcupine will erect its quills and ram backwards at its attacker, leaving the latter with a muzzle full of dislodged quills for its trouble. This easily dislodged quills may have given rise to the myth that the quills can be launched from a distance. Encounter two species of these fascinating rodents along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail—the Malayan and Indian-crested porcupines.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

It is commonly thought that a porcupine is able to shoot its quills at its predator. While these large, prickly rodents do rely on their quills to protect themselves when threatened, they merely rattle their quills as a first warning. If the hapless predator does not get the hint, the porcupine will erect its quills and ram backwards at its attacker, leaving the latter with a muzzle full of dislodged quills for its trouble. This easily dislodged quills may have given rise to the myth that the quills can be launched from a distance. Encounter two species of these fascinating rodents along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail—the Malayan and Indian-crested porcupines.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

No thanks to their inverted hanging ways and the misconception that blood is part of their diet, bats are often associated with vampires. In reality, only a small percentage — just three out of over a thousand of the species — actually consume blood. Fruit bats, like Night Safari’s Malayan flying foxes, keep the ecosystem running like clockwork, by contributing to rainforest regrowth through seed dispersal and pollination, which in turn results in hundreds of commercial products and medicines. Bat guano is also known to be a great fertiliser! Walk through Night Safari’s Mangrove Walk for a closer look at these intriguing winged mammals.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

No thanks to their inverted hanging ways and the misconception that blood is part of their diet, bats are often associated with vampires. In reality, only a small percentage — just three out of over a thousand of the species — actually consume blood. Fruit bats, like Night Safari’s Malayan flying foxes, keep the ecosystem running like clockwork, by contributing to rainforest regrowth through seed dispersal and pollination, which in turn results in hundreds of commercial products and medicines. Bat guano is also known to be a great fertiliser! Walk through Night Safari’s Mangrove Walk for a closer look at these intriguing winged mammals.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wolf imagery is abound in mythology and folklore, and one of the first that comes to mind is the legend of the werewolf. While werewolves are synonymous with shape-shifting, a hulking physique and dense fur coat, Night Safari’s Indian wolf is smaller in stature with a short coat and no shape-shifting abilities, although its fur colouration does help it blend with its surroundings! The only thing the Indian wolf has in common with the famed werewolf is its haunting howl, a vocalization to defend their territory and rally the pack. Don’t miss these elusive creatures on Night Safari’s tram experience. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES      SINGAPORE

Wolf imagery is abound in mythology and folklore, and one of the first that comes to mind is the legend of the werewolf. While werewolves are synonymous with shape-shifting, a hulking physique and dense fur coat, Night Safari’s Indian wolf is smaller in stature with a short coat and no shape-shifting abilities, although its fur colouration does help it blend with its surroundings! The only thing the Indian wolf has in common with the famed werewolf is its haunting howl, a vocalization to defend their territory and rally the pack. Don’t miss these elusive creatures on Night Safari’s tram experience.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

GET TO KNOW ANIMALS NATIVE TO SINGAPORE AT NIGHT SAFARI THIS SEPTEMBER

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Local visitors enjoy 50% discount on admission from Sundays to Thursdays as part of SG50 celebrations

Night Safari is home to two Sunda slow lorises, a nocturnal and arboreal primate native to Singapore with an extremely slow metabolic rate. Due to its attractive appearance, the slow loris is greatly threatened by the pet trade, even though its bite is known to be venomous. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Night Safari is home to two Sunda slow lorises, a nocturnal and arboreal primate native to Singapore with an extremely slow metabolic rate. Due to its attractive appearance, the slow loris is greatly threatened by the pet trade, even though its bite is known to be venomous. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

25 August 2015, SINGAPORE – As Singapore celebrates her 50th anniversary of independence, take a walk on the wild side at Night Safari and get to know animals native to the island, like the Sunda slow loris, Sunda pangolin, mousedeer, and the elusive wild colugo.

Better known as Sang Kancil in Malay folklore, lesser mousedeer are the world’s smallest hoofed mammal. Look out for them along Night Safari’s Fishing Cat Trail. Mousedeer reach sexual maturity at five to six months, and females have been known to give birth to a single offspring at any time of year. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Better known as Sang Kancil in Malay folklore, lesser mousedeer are the world’s smallest hoofed mammal. Look out for them along Night Safari’s Fishing Cat Trail. Mousedeer reach sexual maturity at five to six months, and females have been known to give birth to a single offspring at any time of year. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “In heavily urbanised Singapore, few people know about our island’s wilder side and the fascinating indigenous species that inhabit our wild places. As we celebrate 50 years of achievements since independence, it is also a good time to appreciate that much of our natural heritage is precious and worthy of our conservation. In Night Safari, one of Singapore’s inventions and gifts to the world, many of these creatures can be observed in comfort and safety. Some of these are part of our collection, some are wild denizens such as the colugos.”

Night Safari has earned the distinction of being the first in the world to exhibit and breed the critically-endangered Sunda pangolin. Three babies have been successfully bred in the park since the exhibit opened in 2009. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Night Safari has earned the distinction of being the first in the world to exhibit and breed the critically-endangered Sunda pangolin. Three babies have been successfully bred in the park since the exhibit opened in 2009. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Zoogeographically, Singapore is part of the Sunda biodiversity hotspot, which means it has a very high number of species and they are found nowhere else in the world. It is imperative to protect native flora and fauna to keep the balance of nature. The more an individual understands the natural world, the stronger the push to safeguard the habitat for future generations. Through the years, Night Safari has helped to protect native species through several initiatives including the Common Palm Civet Project, which started in 2009 to mitigate the escalating human-civet conflict. Night Safari also hosted the ‘Scaling up Pangolin Conservation’ conference in 2013 to map out solutions for the global decline of pangolins.

If a trek through a jungle does not appeal, then traipse down to Night Safari—the world’s first wildlife park created to allow observation of wildlife at night —for a wildly exciting journey to spot, learn and appreciate the denizens of Singapore’s local forests.

Another interesting indigenous species is the Malayan porcupine, which can be found along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail. In Singapore, it has been recently recorded on Pulau Tekong. This prickly rodent is known to rattle its quills when startled or excited. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Another interesting indigenous species is the Malayan porcupine, which can be found along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail. In Singapore, it has been recently recorded on Pulau Tekong. This prickly rodent is known to rattle its quills when startled or excited. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Local residents enjoy 50% admission discounts from Sundays to Thursdays in September. For more information and terms and conditions, visit www.nightsafari.com.sg

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