ANIMAL RESIDENTS ENJOY FESTIVE TREATS TO USHER IN YEAR OF THE MONKEY

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Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo roll out enrichment goodies
for wild residents from 6 to 9 Feb 2016

SINGAPORE, 22 January 2016 – The wild residents at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo are ready to swing into the Year of the Monkey with festive enrichment treats specially created by doting keepers. From 6 to 9 February 2016, guests at the four wildlife parks can catch the amusing antics of animals, including a singing parrot wishing everyone “Gong Xi Fa Cai” and giant pandas enjoying their favourite food from larger-than-life ang pows.

For some serious monkey business, head down to Singapore Zoo which is home to over 30 monkey species. Some of the world’s rarest monkeys like the cotton-top tamarin, Javan langur and golden-headed lion tamarin will receive festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. As the monkeys chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights such as oranges, nuts and seeds, guests can marvel at their nimble and agile movements, adore their stunning features, or just snap away for a photo memory.

Other festivities across the four wildlife parks include acrobatic lion dance performances, meet and greet sessions with God of Fortune and Fu Lu Shou mascots, and a Zoodiac trail for guests to discover their fortune forecast in the Year of the Monkey.

CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 1  CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 1-2: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of palm-sized monkeys such as the endangered golden-headed lion tamarins as they chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 1   CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 3-4: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of monkeys such as the threatened Javan langur enjoying festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

ACTIVITIES AT A GLANCECNY Table.jpg

 

For more information, visit wildcny.sg

 

PASSING OF RED PANDA AT RIVER SAFARI

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Female red panda Poonya at River Safari

SINGAPORE, 15 January 2016 – Wildlife Reserves Singapore is saddened by the passing of River Safari’s female red panda named Poonya.

Poonya had been suffering from gut infection and was under treatment since 7 January 2016. Despite keepers and vets providing 24-hour intensive care, her condition deteriorated. The red panda passed on at 1am on 13 January 2016. She was five years old.

Poonya arrived at River Safari in 2012, along with a male red panda named Puska from Johannesburg Zoo, South Africa.

River Safari is a member of the World Zoos and Aquariums Association’s Global Species Management Plan (GSMP) for red pandas. The park hopes to bring in another female panda.

The red panda shares similar diet and habitat as the giant panda, but is more closely related to raccoons and weasels instead of bears.

JURONG BIRD PARK, NIGHT SAFARI, RIVER SAFARI AND SINGAPORE ZOO REPORT OVER 700 ANIMAL BIRTHS AND HATCHINGS IN 2015

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Over a third of the babies are native or Southeast Asian species, affirming the parks’ bid to conserve biodiversity in Singapore and Southeast Asia

WRS SZ - Chomel, a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, gave birth to a male on 16 September 2015. Orangutans are Singapore Zoo’s flagship species - 2

Over 700 animal babies were born or hatched in Wildlife Reserves Singapore parks in 2015. Chomel, a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, gave birth on 16 September 2015. The male baby is Chomel’s second offspring—her first son, Bino, is now five years old. Young orangutans will remain with their mother for several years until they learn the necessary skills to live independently. Orangutans are Singapore Zoo’s flagship species. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore, 12 January 2016 – More than 700 furry, feathery and scaly young across 150 species were born or hatched in Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo in 2015. Among them, over 40 species are listed as threatened under the *IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Deputy CEO and Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Each of these births and hatchings is significant and is part of Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s efforts to conserve threatened wildlife, particularly in Singapore and Southeast Asia. Breeding under human care allows us to maintain sustainable populations without having to collect from the wild, and our living collection serves to inspire positive actions in people to conserve our environment and biodiversity.”

Among the most exciting births of the year is that of a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan born on 16 September 2015. The primate is the great-grandson of Singapore Zoo’s late icon, Ah Meng. To date, over 40 orangutans have been born in Singapore Zoo. To facilitate the breeding of these charismatic apes and ensure genetic diversity, orangutans born in the park have been sent to zoological institutions in Malaysia, India, Vietnam, Japan, Australia and New Zealand as part of a worldwide exchange programme.

WRS SZ - Ayana, which means blossoming beauty, is Singapore Zoo’s latest pygmy hippopotamus addition. She was born on 11 April 2015

Ayana, which means blossoming beauty, is Singapore Zoo’s latest pygmy hippopotamus addition. She was born on 11 April 2015 and is the 11th offspring of parents Bubu and Minah. 23 pygmy hippopotamuses have been born in Singapore Zoo in the past 42 years. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

2015 also saw the births of critically endangered cotton-top tamarins, a species of tiny primates, and endangered Southern white rhinoceros and pygmy hippopotamus in Singapore Zoo. The park has an exceptionally impressive track record with all three species, welcoming over 80 cotton-top tamarins, 16 Southern white rhinoceroses and 23 pygmy hippopotamuses in the past 42 years.

WRS RS - River Safari saw two new additions of emperor tamarins – tiny primates with outstanding “facial hair”

River Safari saw two new additions of emperor tamarins – tiny primates with outstanding “facial hair”. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

River Safari welcomed another manatee calf in October, bringing the park’s total herd to 13 individuals. The park also saw the hatchings of unusual amphibians like the fire-bellied newt, a species of small newt native to China, and the births of capybara, super-sized rodents native to South America.

Animal births in Night Safari were particularly exciting as many of the species are from Singapore or Southeast Asia, like Malayan sambar deer, Malayan bearded pig, binturong, hog badger, and the endangered Burmese brow-antlered deer.

Moving beyond the region, Night Safari saw three births of Indian crested porcupines in two years. The park also welcomed two pups to its cackle of spotted hyenas, bringing the park’s total to 11.

WRS NS - Night Safari’s cackle of spotted hyenas added two more to their family in October. Born fully black, the pups slowly develop spots characteristic of the species within months of birth

Night Safari’s cackle of spotted hyenas added two more to their family in October. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Jurong Bird Park continues to be actively involved in the breeding of threatened species, with the hatchings of two Bali mynahs and eight Luzon bleeding-heart doves. The park works closely with Avilon Zoo and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) in the Philippines and Begawan Foundation in Bali, Indonesia, to increase the off-site numbers of these precious birds. The Bali mynah additions in 2015 are particularly special as it is the first time these chicks are hand-raised. All progenies will eventually be sent back to their respective home countries to be released into the wild.

Also joining the park’s avian collection is the lesser bird-of-paradise, the first successful hatching in over a decade. These birds, prized for their beautiful plumage, are notoriously hard to breed in captivity because of their unique courtship rituals prior to mating.

Dr Cheng added, “Captive breeding programmes play an important role in conserving threatened animal species whose numbers are declining as a result of activities like habitat destruction and poaching.  Some of them can be valuable assurance colonies against extinction in the wild, with the aim of ultimate release back to nature, while all of them are ambassadors representing their relatives in the wild.”

*International Union for Conservation of Nature

WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE HOSTS 23RD SOUTH EAST ASIAN ZOOS ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE

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Zoo experts from 18 countries unite to work towards
sustainable captive population of Southeast Asian species

SINGAPORE, 2 November 2015 – Over 200 specialists from the region’s zoos and wildlife institutions have come together this week for the 23rd South East Asian Zoos Association (SEAZA) conference to achieve a common goal of a sustainable captive population of Southeast Asian species. Hosted by Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS), the four-day conference was officiated this morning by Mr S Dhanabalan, Chairman, Mandai Safari Park Holdings Pte Ltd, the holding company of WRS.

Held from 1 to 4 November, the conference calls for a coordinated approach in animal management to ensure desirable outcomes for species requiring conservation attention. It brings together over 200 zoo professionals from 18 countries including Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. Experts will discuss conservation action plans for sustainable populations, breeding strategies, best practices in healthcare, animal welfare and ethics as well as conservation efforts for threatened species.

Dr Phan Viet Lam, President of SEAZA, said: “This conference is another milestone for SEAZA in the conservation and management of sustainable populations in Southeast Asia. Zoos in this region have an important role in this context and we hope to develop strategic action plans for species conservation and visitor education.”

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, WRS and Vice President of SEAZA said: “The annual SEAZA conference is a significant event in the calendar for zoos in our region and we are proud to be the host this year. It brings together zoo and aquarium professionals from Southeast Asia and beyond to share best practices and ideas in achieving our common missions of wildlife conservation and education.”

One of the primary objectives of the conference is to identify key Southeast Asian species for conservation and regional studbook development—a first in the region. The studbook tracks the relatedness of animals in zoo collections and allow managers to coordinate and regulate breeding programmes to achieve long-term genetic and demographic sustainability.

In addition, delegates will share findings and experiences, such as acupuncture in birds and avian surrogacy in hatchlings from WRS’ aviculturists. The conference will be complemented by workshops in Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari and Singapore Zoo, where delegates will go behind the scenes for practical hands-on sessions to learn more about the incubation of bird eggs and creating a master plan for conservation education.

In recent years, WRS has organised various conferences and workshops for capacity building and conservation strategy planning, such as the International Congress on Zookeeping and the recent Songbird Crisis Summit.

GO WILD FOR SG50!

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Residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo celebrate Jubilee Weekend in true Singapore-style with flags and celebratory songs; local visitors enjoy 50% admission discounts

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

3 August 2015, SINGAPORE – The wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday came from the rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island.

For over four decades, animal residents in the wildlife parks have witnessed Singapore’s growth and development through changing faces of zoo-goers — skipping kids of yesteryears have now returned as parents and grandparents, bulky film cameras have been replaced by palm-sized smartphones, and even paper maps are making way for interactive apps. The open concept exhibits, which were already revolutionary when the Bird Park and Zoo opened in the ‘70s, became enhanced and more immersive.

Today, the animal residents not only hold special places in the hearts of many Singaporeans, they have also drawn crowds from all over the world.

During the Jubilee Weekend, visitors can expect some wild antics from the animals as they pay tribute to the nation:
– In Jurong Bird Park, Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo will fly the Singapore flag high while Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon parrot will sing ‘Happy Birthday’ in the High Flyers Show.

Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon parrot singing a heartfelt rendition of ‘Happy Birthday’ for Singapore. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at Jurong Bird Park’s High Flyers Show at 11am and 3pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon parrot singing a heartfelt rendition of ‘Happy Birthday’ for Singapore. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at Jurong Bird Park’s High Flyers Show at 11am and 3pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

– In Singapore Zoo, the largest residents of the park have perfected the art of flag-raising in the Elephants at Work and Play show, and the sea lions are ready for a little SG50 surprise in the Splash Safari show.

Jati and Gambir, Singapore Zoo’s female Asian elephants, raising the Singapore flag and WRS’ SG50-inspired logo with their trunks as a trumpeting salute to the nation’s 50th birthday. Visitors can catch these giants at the Elephants at Work and Play show at 11.30am and 3.30pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Jati and Gambir, Singapore Zoo’s female Asian elephants, raising the Singapore flag and WRS’ SG50-inspired logo with their trunks as a trumpeting salute to the nation’s 50th birthday. Visitors can catch these giants at the Elephants at Work and Play show at 11.30am and 3.30pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo’s California sea lion proudly waving the Singapore flag at the Splash Safari show to wish everyone a Happy National Day. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at 10.30am and 5pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo’s California sea lion proudly waving the Singapore flag at the Splash Safari show to wish everyone a Happy National Day. The SG50-themed presentation will take place at 10.30am and 5pm during the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

As a treat for local residents, month-long admission discounts are available in August, in addition to the ongoing SG50 promotion for Feather Friends membership at Jurong Bird Park. Local residents enjoy 50% discount on admission at Jurong Bird Park, as well as 50% discount on same-day bundled tickets to River Safari and Singapore Zoo.

During the Jubilee Weekend from 7 to 10 August, visitors to Jurong Bird Park, River Safari and Singapore Zoo can also get their hands on a free limited edition SG50 animal-themed tote bag while stocks last.

SG50-Themed Animal Presentations
7 – 10 Aug 2015
Jurong Bird Park
High Flyers Show at Pools Amphitheatre
11.00am & 3.00pm

Singapore Zoo
Elephants at Work and Play at Elephants of Asia
11.30am & 3.30pm
Splash Safari at Shaw Foundation Amphitheatre
10.30am & 5.00pm

SG50 Promotions for Local Residents
Jurong Bird Park
1 – 31 Aug 2015
50% off admission to Jurong Bird Park
Singaporeans, permanent residents and employment pass holders enjoy 50% discount on admission by flashing coupons and proof of identity at Jurong Bird Park ticket counters. Visit www.birdpark.com.sg/ndp50 for more information.

River Safari and Singapore Zoo
1 – 31 Aug 2015
50% off bundled admission to River Safari and Singapore Zoo
Singaporeans, permanent residents and employment pass holders enjoy 50% discount on bundled admission to River Safari and Singapore Zoo. Proof of identity required. Valid for same-day visits only. Visit www.wrs.com.sg/sg50 for more information.

Jurong Bird Park, River Safari and Singapore Zoo
7 – 10 Aug 2015
Free SG50 animal-themed tote bag
Visitors to the three wildlife parks can get their hands on a free SG50 animal-themed woven tote bag (worth $3). Limited to 1 bag per visitor, while stocks last.

Jurong Bird Park
1 Dec 2014 – 31 Dec 2015
SG50 promotion for Feather Friends membership: Enjoy 1 year unlimited entry for the price of a 1 day ticket
For the price of a one day admission ticket, local residents can sign up for a special Feather Friends membership and enjoy unlimited year-round entry to Jurong Bird Park. Local residents can enjoy this special membership at S$28 for adults, and S$18 for children (aged 3 – 12 years) and senior citizens (aged 60 years and above). This on-going promotion was launched in Dec 2014 and will end on 31 Dec 2015. Those interested can sign up at the entrance of Jurong Bird Park, or online at members.wrs.com.sg to skip queues.
Feather Friends Jubilee Special
Receive a special fun pack with every Feather Friends membership sign-up. Promotion valid from 7 to 31 August. Terms and conditions apply.

WRS CALLS FOR CURBS IN ILLEGAL ANIMAL TRADE AFTER RESCUE OF 4000 CRITICALLY ENDGANGERED TURTLES

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Over 4,400 freshwater turtles, among them the critically endangered Palawan forest turtles, were bound to be sent from their native Palawan, in the Philippines, to markets in China when rescuers made the devastating discovery. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Over 4,400 freshwater turtles, among them the critically endangered Palawan forest turtles, were bound to be sent from their native Palawan, in the Philippines, to markets in China when rescuers made the devastating discovery. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Singapore, 8 July 2015 — Over 4,400 freshwater turtles, among them the critically endangered Palawan forest turtles, were bound to be sent from their native Palawan, in the Philippines, to markets in China when rescuers made the devastating discovery.

The animals – including 3,907 Palawan forest turtles, 168 Asian leaf turtles and 25 Southeast Asian box turtles – were handed over to Katala Foundation Inc (KFI), a Philippine wildlife NGO, for safekeeping and rehabilitation. Wildlife Reserves Singapore has for the last three years  provided on-going financial support to the KFI conservation efforts for the Philippine forest turtle, Palawan pangolin and Philippine cockatoo.

Many of the turtles were on the verge of death, or were in bad condition from months of neglect in captivity, showing major symptoms of dehydration as well as severe shell necrosis, ocular lesions and bite wounds. An urgent appeal to the global turtle community was issued to assist these threatened animals.

Among the first rescue team members to arrive in Palawan was Dr Sonja Luz, Director of Conservation and Research, Wildlife Reserves Singapore. Dr Luz, a trained vet, brought medical supplies with her, and collaborated with experts from Hong Kong Ocean Park, Turtle Conservancy and Turtle Survival Alliance in the first days of the crisis. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Among the first rescue team members to arrive in Palawan was Dr Sonja Luz, Director of Conservation and Research, Wildlife Reserves Singapore. Dr Luz, a trained vet, brought medical supplies with her, and collaborated with experts from Hong Kong Ocean Park, Turtle Conservancy and Turtle Survival Alliance in the first days of the crisis. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Among the first rescue team members to arrive in Palawan was Dr Sonja Luz, Director of Conservation and Research, Wildlife Reserves Singapore. WRS immediately committed help with medical supplies and equipment, and a donation of SGD15,000 to fund the rehabilitation process. Dr Luz, a trained vet, brought these supplies with her and, together with international veterinary colleagues from Hong Kong Ocean Park, Turtle Conservancy and Turtle Survival Alliance, attended to the  medical needs of the turtles.

She said, “It was overwhelming in the beginning to be on ground attending to the thousands of turtles struggling for their survival, but the good news is that because of the amazing local and international team efforts, most of these animals could be rehabilitated. To all of us involved, it is frustrating and devastating that the majority of people do not understand how the demand for wild animals and their body parts is driving countless species in this region to extinction. Only if we can stop the demand and stop people from buying products will we have a chance to beat illegal wildlife trade.”

The turtles are believed to have been collected over several months from across their native range of northern Palawan, and were bound for markets in China. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

The turtles are believed to have been collected over several months from across their native range of northern Palawan, and were bound for markets in China. Photo credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

The turtles are believed to have been collected over several months from across their native range of northern Palawan, and were bound for markets in China.

Demand for animal skin, meat, and body parts as well as for pets is on the rise with growing affluence and purchasing power, and thousands of animal species like the Palawan freshwater turtle are being driven towards an accelerated extinction. Wildlife Reserves Singapore works closely with like-minded partners such as TRAFFIC to curb illegal wildlife trade, and launched the You Buy They Die campaign in March 2015.

According to reports in the Philippines, authorities have arrested the caretaker of the warehouse in which the turtles were found. The Palawan Council for Sustainable Development enforcers and members of the Provincial Law Enforcement Task Force were preparing to file charges against a Chinese national believed to be the owner of the warehouse.

When making future visits to Wildlife Reserves Singapore parks—Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo—look out for the You Buy They Die interpretive and learn more about what can be done to stop illegal wildlife trade.

INDIGENOUS ANIMALS FEATURED IN “BIODIVERSITY IS US” PROJECT

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WRS creates localised version of global biodiversity campaign; Sunda pangolin, oriental pied hornbill among animals featured

Wildlife Reserves Singapore head vet Dr Serena Oh gives her daughter Megan a piggy back ride, much like how mother pangolins cart their young around, in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project with a series of photos that depicts how humans and animals are closely connected. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wildlife Reserves Singapore head vet Dr Serena Oh gives her daughter Megan a piggy back ride, much like how mother pangolins cart their young around, in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project with a series of photos that depicts how humans and animals are closely connected. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 27 June 2015 — Indigenous animals that live in the tropical rainforests, mangroves or coral ecosystems of Singapore take center stage in Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, with a series of photos that depicts how humans and animals are closely connected.

Featuring Singapore’s fauna like the critically endangered Sunda pangolin, oriental-pied hornbill, tokay gecko, crab-eating macaques and knobbly sea stars, the project serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions that individuals can do to protect it.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation & Research Manager Jessica Lee displays how humans and oriental pied hornbills are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation & Research Manager Jessica Lee displays how humans and oriental pied hornbills are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Visitors to the Festival of Biodiversity on 27 and 28 June at Vivocity can visit the Wildlife Reserves Singapore booth to learn more about Biodiversity is Us, and have their pictures taken for their own Biodiversity is Us e-poster. The public can also download the free Biodiversity is Us app to learn about 400 animal species, take part in games and quizzes, build animal checklists and more.

Singapore Zoo’s Deputy Head reptile keeper Jose Pedro Cairos displays how humans and tokay geckos are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo’s Deputy Head reptile keeper Jose Pedro Cairos displays how humans and tokay geckos are closely connected in the local rendition of the “Biodiversity is Us” project, which serves to share knowledge of the environment and the amazing array of life on our planet, and the simple actions individuals can do to protect it. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Biodiversity is Us is initiated by the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums, and supports the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011–2020 by providing tools for raising awareness about biodiversity.

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