KOALAMANIA HITS SINGAPORE ZOO THIS JUNE

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Go wild with koa-lity holiday activities and stand a chance to win a family trip to Queensland

Koalamania

18 May 2015, SINGAPORE – Koalas Chan, Idalia, Pellita and Paddle have arrived at Singapore Zoo for their tropical vacation and are ready to meet visitors from 12pm on 20 May! Say “G’day” to the four lovely ladies from Down Under, take part in Zoolympix 2015, and go wild with Koalamania this June school holidays.

For five weekends from 30 May to 28 June, young visitors can show their love for the furry marsupials by donning koala masks, and create koala keepsakes such as origami art, pencil huggers and Australian aboriginal-inspired dot paintings. Snap a photo at the zoo’s koala photo illusion wall, upload it on the Koalamania website (http://www.zoo.com.sg/koala-mania/) and stand to win a family holiday to Queensland, Australia with Qantas Airways!

The annual Zoolympix is also back this June with a line-up of fun and educational activities inviting kids (aged 5-12 years) to play Junior Explorers for a day. Held for 15 activity days between 30 May and 28 June, explorers can help save animal friends from the brink of extinction.

In celebration of SG50, local residents visiting Singapore Zoo can visit River Safari on the same day and enjoy 50% off River Safari admission tickets. Singaporeans and permanent residents aged 60 years and above enjoy free admission to Singapore Zoo from 30 May to 30 June 2015.*

*Terms and conditions for promotions apply. Visit http://zoo.com.sg/events-promos/events-promos.html for details.

Activity Details

Zoolympix 2015
30 May to 7 June, 13, 14, 20, 21, 27, 28 June
Starting point at Zoolympix booth near entrance
Junior Explorers can pick up a Zoolympix booklet near the entrance of Singapore Zoo before seeking out the five wildlife-themed game stations that are scattered around the park. Help save animals and protect their homes through fun activities, while learning about environmental threats.
All participants are entitled to a Spin and Win lucky draw on completing the Zoolympix booklet.
Participants can also look forward to sale of educational materials, exclusive badges and an education awareness booth.

Koalamania!
30 May to 28 June 2015 (Weekends only)
Koala Mask-cum-Fan Giveaway (Limited to 1000 pieces daily, while stocks last)
Wear your love for koalas… on your face! The adorable mask doubles as a fan to keep you cool throughout the day.

Koala Kling-on Optical Illusion Photo Wall
Snap a photo at our illusion wall, upload it on the Koalamania website (http://www.zoo.com.sg/koala-mania/) and stand to win a family holiday to Queensland, Australia!

11am and 1pm (30mins each)
Didgeridoo (aboriginal wind instrument) performance by The Earthtone Project – hang around for a chance to try playing Australian aboriginal instruments.

10am, 12 noon, 4pm (30mins each)
Mascot Mania – look out for the adorable koalas and Zoo Hoo elephant, orang utan and zebra mascots! Snap photos with them for a memorable keepsake.

10am to 4pm
Koala-ty Crafts – Young koala fans can get krafty with koala and aboriginal-themed crafts like origami, sticker printing and dot painting on pebbles.

RUB OFF SOME GOAT LUCK AT SINGAPORE ZOO AND NIGHT SAFARI THIS LUNAR NEW YEAR

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Eight auspicious goat kids born in Singapore Zoo and exotic goat species in Night Safari will greet visitors

Singapore Zoo keepers Mohd Hanafi and Amy Chandra show off three of the newest members of Singapore Zoo’s domestic goat herd which arrived just in time to usher in the Year of the Goat. Since 1 Jan 2015, Singapore Zoo has welcomed eight baby goats. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo keepers Mohd Hanafi and Amy Chandra show off three of the newest members of Singapore Zoo’s domestic goat herd which arrived just in time to usher in the Year of the Goat. Since 1 Jan 2015, Singapore Zoo has welcomed eight baby goats. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 11 February 2015 – Usher in the Year of the Goat at Singapore Zoo and Night Safari to marvel at the beauty and grace of this year’s zodiac animal, and learn all about the elegant species.

Singapore Zoo

Originating in Egypt, the domestic goat can now be found, either farmed or feral, in every continent except Antarctica. Goats are able to thrive in almost any habitat including savanna, deserts, scrub forests and mountains. This Chinese New Year, learn more about goats and their wild cousins at the Goat Awareness booth at Singapore Zoo. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Originating in Egypt, the domestic goat can now be found, either farmed or feral, in every continent except Antarctica. Goats are able to thrive in almost any habitat including savanna, deserts, scrub forests and mountains. This Chinese New Year, learn more about goats and their wild cousins at the Goat Awareness booth at Singapore Zoo. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo has welcomed the birth of eight goat kids in the last two months, an auspicious sign of a bountiful year to come. The gamboling goat kids are looking forward to charming visitors to Singapore Zoo this festive season as part of the Chinese New Year celebrations.

Visitors looking to rub off some goat luck can capture some precious shots with this year’s zodiac animal, watch goat enrichment, or feed the goats. In addition, children can learn more about goats and their wild cousins at a specially curated Goat Awareness Booth. All goat-themed Chinese New Year activities will run from 18-22 February.

For activity details, visit Chinese New Year Celebrations at Singapore Zoo.

Night Safari

The ‘snake-horned’ markhor is named for their spiraling horns, which can grow up to 160cm, that adorn the males’ heads. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

The ‘snake-horned’ markhor is named for their spiraling horns, which can grow up to 160cm, that adorn the males’ heads. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Over at Night Safari, visitors can marvel at the wilder cousins of the domestic goats – the ‘snakehorned’ markhor, handsome Himalayan tahr, ‘blue’ bharal and rare mouflon.

The Himalayan tahr thrives on rugged alpine mountains from northern India to Bhutan, and male tahrs have a long shaggy mane in winter. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

The Himalayan tahr thrives on rugged alpine mountains from northern India to Bhutan, and male tahrs have a long shaggy mane in winter. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While only the markhor and tahr are considered true goats, the bharal and mouflon are wild sheep that are no less nimble and sure-footed, making their homes in mountainous and rocky regions. These wild goats and sheep can be encountered along the Night Safari tram route.

For activity details, visit Chinese New Year Celebrations at Night Safari

The goats in Mandai enjoy the centre stage and look forward to welcoming visitors over the Lunar New Year holidays.

ANIMAL FRIENDS WISH ONE AND ALL A PROSPEROUS LUNAR NEW YEAR

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Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo usher in the Year of the Goat with festive activities from 18 to 22 Feb 2015

Take photos with Singapore Zoo’s new kids on the block at selected timings during the Lunar New Year.  Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Take photos with Singapore Zoo’s new kids on the block at selected timings during the Lunar New Year. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

4 February 2015, Singapore – This Lunar New Year, usher in the Year of the Goat with wild animal friends at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo and take part in a herd of activities from 18 to 22 February.

Be greeted by an a-baa-ndance of surprises as the parks get decked out for the Lunar New Year with creative plant displays, festive animal enrichment and up-close encounters, and photo moments with adorable baby goats! Be sure to catch the acrobatic lion dance performances and meet the prosperity mascots.

Animal Encounters
Goat Kids Photography at Singapore Zoo: Be charmed by the boisterous and adorable herd of young goats at Singapore Zoo, and witness an entourage of six baby goats (called kids) prancing alongside their keepers against the scenic backdrop of Upper Seletar Reservoir. Be sure to snap a souvenir shot with this year’s zodiac animal!

Wings of Asia Tour at Jurong Bird Park: Tour the park’s latest attraction and discover threatened species such as the beautiful Bali mynah and Luzon bleeding-heart dove, in an aviary featuring one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of Asian birds. Stand a chance to win ang pows during a Q&A session at the end of the 15-minute tour.

Festive High Flyers Show at Jurong Bird Park: Lucky visitors will receive red packets delivered by Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo, and well-wishes of ‘Gong Xi Fa Cai’ from Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon.

River Safari’s squirrel monkeys get into the festive mood with ang pows filled with treats this Lunar New Year. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

River Safari’s squirrel monkeys get into the festive mood with ang pows filled with treats this Lunar New Year. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Festive Animal Enrichment
Special treats for the animals serve as enrichment and encourage them to display their natural behaviours. If you’re lucky, you can catch them at their best as they chomp, dig, and crunch their way through their festive delights.

Jurong Bird Park: Fly in to the Breeding and Research Centre to watch ‘bird nannies’ giving young parrots enrichment such as ang pows filled with treats and oranges.

Night Safari: Look out for Asian elephants, Malayan tapirs and Indian rhinos enjoying festive goodies during the tram ride. Then trek the walking trails and peer at Himalayan tahrs, Malayan tigers, fishing cats, common palm civets and wallabies as they uncover hidden treats.

River Safari: Catch the cute antics of giant pandas, red pandas, crab-eating macaques and squirrel monkeys as they receive giant ang pows.

Southern Lion Dance
A pair of spectacular Southern lions will shimmy their way atop high poles in a high-octane performance at Jurong Bird Park, River Safari and Singapore Zoo. As the sun sets, a pair of dazzling LED-lit Southern lions will light up the sky at Night Safari. This traditional mix of martial art, acrobatic and stage performance was introduced to Southeast Asia more than a century ago, and remains a mainstay of Lunar New Year celebrations.

Prosperity Mascot Appearances
No Lunar New Year is complete without good fortune from the prosperity mascots! Fu Lu Shou and the God of Fortune will make appearances at the four wildlife parks. Visitors at River Safari can also look out for Kai Kai, Jia Jia, red panda and golden pheasant mascots in their festive finery, as they spread the joy with 88 lucky ang pows daily.

Spin the Wheel at River Safari
Don’t miss out on the chance to win attractive prizes at River Safari! Simply present your admission ticket for an opportunity to spin the wheel, with a total of 88 prizes to be won daily.

For more information on activity details, please visit Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo.

LITTLE ZOO HOO WILDLIFE WARRIORS CAN DISCOVER WAYS TO SAVE THE EARTH IN SINGAPORE ZOO THIS DECEMBER

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Visitors are invited to go wild with fun activities like token feeding surprises,
warrior trail stations and play sessions every weekend from 6 – 28 December

Snap a photo with the Zoo Hoo Mascots at Singapore Zoo this year-end holidays before going on the Wildlife Warrior Trail to learn more about loving and saving wildlife through play and game. Zoo Hoo 2014 at Singapore Zoo happens every weekend from 6-28 December.  PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Snap a photo with the Zoo Hoo Mascots at Singapore Zoo this year-end holidays before going on the Wildlife Warrior Trail to learn more about loving and saving wildlife through play and game. Zoo Hoo 2014 at Singapore Zoo happens every weekend from 6-28 December.
PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Singapore, 19 November 2014 – Let the little ones unleash their heroism and become Zoo Hoo Wildlife Warriors at Singapore Zoo every weekend from 6 – 28 December, which promises fun and educational activities such as game challenges, art and craft stations and an interactive play and storytelling experience.

Kids on the Wildlife Warrior Trail (WWT) will learn ways to protect and save threatened animal species such as the orang utan, white rhinoceros, and Asian elephant. The first 350 kids to complete the trail every activity day will be rewarded with a special WWT goodie!

Along the way, enjoy art and craft sessions and make bottle cap badges, stickers and even your own 2015 calendar. Zoo Hoo 2014 at Singapore Zoo happens every weekend from 6-28 December.  PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Along the way, enjoy art and craft sessions and make bottle cap badges, stickers and even your own 2015 calendar. Zoo Hoo 2014 at Singapore Zoo happens every weekend from 6-28 December.
PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Wildlife Warrior Trail

Date:          6-28 December 2014 (weekends only)

Venue:       Singapore Zoo (80 Mandai Lake Road Singapore 729826)

Fee:           Free of charge

Notes:       Singapore Zoo admission rates of $28.00 (adult) and $18.00 (child ages 3 to 12 years) apply

Highlights

Table of Activities

PUMPKIN TREATS, UP-CLOSE ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS AND FREE ADMISSION FOR KIDS AT RIVER SAFARI’S INAUGURAL SAFARI BOO

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Safari Boo @River Safari - Red panda pumpkin treats 2 Safari Boo @River Safari - Giant panda pumpkin treats

Images 1 to 3: Animal residents at River Safari (from left: red panda and giant panda) enjoying pumpkins filled with their favourite treats as part of a special enrichment programme during the daytime Safari Boo festivities in October and November. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

SINGAPORE, 17 October 2014 – It was a night of wild trick-or-treat fun as close to 200 invited guests enjoyed a closed-door preview of River Safari’s first Safari Boo. Costume-clad visitors, including 60 preschoolers, were treated to a special animal presentation on creepy crawlies, up-close animal encounters, a host of mythical creatures as well as an after-dark experience with the park’s river monsters.
Held over five days on Oct 22, 25, 26 & Nov 1 and 2, Safari Boo festivities take place from 6pm to 9pm (last admission at 8pm). Kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm and are encouraged to dress up for this merry-not-scary event to stand a chance to win in a costume contest.
Safari Boo festivities include interactive discovery stations where little ones can play archaeologist and uncover animal bones to solve mysteries. Those brave for some scaly encounters can feel the unique body covering of animals such as the pangolin and arapaima, and find out why these animals are threatened because of their scales.
For more information, visit www.riversafari.com.sg/safariboo

Safari Boo @River Safari - Bearded dragon at River Talk Myths & Legends Safari Boo @River Safari - Pygmy hedgehog at River Talk Myths & Legends

Images 4 & 5: As part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November, visitors can expect up-close encounters with animals such as the bearded dragon (left) and pygmy hedgehog (right) in a special animal presentation titled “River Talk: Myths and Legends”. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Image 6: Learn more about the scales of animals such as the pangolin and snake and find out why they are threatened at the “Scaly Encounters” booth at Safari Boo. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Image 6: Learn more about the scales of animals such as the pangolin and snake and find out why they are threatened at the “Scaly Encounters” booth at Safari Boo. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm.
Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Image 7: Kai Kai & Jia Jia mascots all decked out in their Safari Boo best as they surprise little ones with trick-or-treat bags as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November.  Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Image 7: Kai Kai & Jia Jia mascots all decked out in their Safari Boo best as they surprise little ones with trick-or-treat bags as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November.
Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Image 8: Mystical characters such as the mermaid come alive in the Enchanted Trail as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Image 8: Mystical characters such as the mermaid come alive in the Enchanted Trail as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm.
Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

GET DRESSED FOR TRICK-OR-TREAT FUN AT RIVER SAFARI’S FIRST SAFARI BOO

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Kids enjoy merry-not-scary festivities for free at River Safari from 6pm

Safari Boo visual

SINGAPORE, 1 October 2014 – This October, River Safari invites all little ones to join Singapore’s wildest trick-or-treat event – Safari Boo – for free! Dress the kids in their favourite costumes for an enchanting night with mythical creatures, interactive discovery stations, special animal presentations, and up-close encounters with river monsters at twilight.

Held over five days on Oct 22, 25, 26 & Nov 1 and 2, Safari Boo festivities take place from 6pm to 9pm (last admission at 8pm). The park will be transformed with colourful decoration, trick-or-treat trails, illuminated displays and a parade of fantastical characters such as the mermaid and unicorn. Children aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm* and are encouraged to come dressed in fun (not scary) costumes and stand a chance to win in a costume contest. To get into the festive spirit, even Kai Kai & Jia Jia mascots will be decked out in their Safari Boo outfit.

Mr Lee Meng Tat, Chief Executive Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Safari Boo is an all-new event for families with children to have a fun and educational time at River Safari. Through the exciting programme line-up and hands-on activities, we hope visitors will have a memorable adventure in the park and learn a thing or two about wildlife.”

As part of the festivities at Safari Boo, the Giant Panda Courtyard will be home to a myriad of activity stations, including one where little ones can play archaeologist and uncover animal bones to solve mysteries. Those brave for some scaly encounters can feel the unique body covering of animals such as the pangolin and arapaima, and find out why these animals are threatened because of their scales.

Meet a friendly witch and Frankenstein himself, who will introduce various creatures of the night and charm visitors with stories in River Talk: Myths and Legends. This special animal presentation features up-close encounters with snakes, bearded dragons and creepy-crawlies, and is a purr-fect opportunity for kids (and even adults) to get over their phobias and educate others against developing fears of these misunderstood creatures.

Those bone on the wild side will love the after-dark experience at River Safari where they will get to observe the behaviours of river monsters such as the powerful arapaima and colossal giant freshwater stingray. Visitors can also find out more about creatures with blood-thirsty reputation such as the leech and tick, and even get a chance to feel the fangs of the vampire bat!

Safari Boo features daytime festivities where animals will indulge in special pumpkins filled with their favourite treats! Catch the cute antics of giant pandas, red pandas and squirrel monkeys as they chomp, dig and crunch their way through the festive treats as a form of enrichment. Visitors can also embark on a guided trail to learn freaky facts about the river monsters that roam in the park.

Squirrel monkeys indulging in pumpkin treats as part of Safari Boo

Safari Boo event tickets (6pm to 9pm) are priced at $15 for adults. Last admission is at 8pm. Children aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm*. Visitors with River Safari admission tickets can take part in Safari Boo activities for free.

For more information, refer to the Appendix below or visit www.riversafari.com.sg/safariboo

*Terms and conditions apply.

Appendix

1. ADMISSION

Safari Boo activity days:

  • 22 Oct (Wed, Deepavali)
  • 25 Oct (Sat)
  • 26 Oct (Sun)
  • 1 Nov (Sat)
  • 2 Nov 2014 (Sun)

admission

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

  • Activities are weather-permitting.
  • Safari Boo festivities take place from 6pm to 9pm. Last admission is at 8pm.
  • The Giant Panda Forest, Squirrel Monkey Forest and boat rides will be closed as per normal opening times at River Safari and will not be opened for Safari Boo.
  • River Safari and Park Hopper (with River Safari option) admission ticket holders can take part in Safari Boo activities for free.
  • Safari Boo ticket holders can only enter the park from 6pm.
  • River Safari & Park Hopper admission tickets and Safari Boo event tickets can be purchased at Singapore Zoo ticketing counters or at www.riversafari.com.sg/safariboo.
  • Sale of Safari Boo tickets at Singapore Zoo ticketing counters starts at 5pm.
  • Adult supervision is required for all kids participating in Safari Boo. Child is defined as individuals aged 12 years and below.
  • Complimentary tickets for kids to enter for free from 6pm can be collected by accompanying adults at Singapore Zoo ticketing counters from 5pm.
  • For online purchases, all complimentary child ticket redemptions must be accompanied by at least one paid adult event ticket per transaction.

2. ACTIVITIES AT A GLANCE

activities

RHINOS IN TROUBLE: LEARN THE HORNEST TRUTH AT SINGAPORE ZOO’S RHINO CONSERVATION AWARENESS CAMPAIGN

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Singapore Zoo aims to raise awareness on the plight of rhinoceroses in the wild;
Campaign kick-starts with expert forum including speakers from TRAFFIC and WCS

Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s rhinoceros keepers join guests in clipping their fingernails to symbolise their commitment to rhino conservation ahead of the month-long Rhinos in Trouble awareness campaign at Singapore Zoo, which starts on 20 September 2014. Rhinos’ horns are made of keratin, the same material found in human hair and nails. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s rhinoceros keepers join guests in clipping their fingernails to symbolise their commitment to rhino conservation ahead of the month-long Rhinos in Trouble awareness campaign at Singapore Zoo, which starts on 20 September 2014. Rhinos’ horns are made of keratin, the same material found in human hair and nails. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.)

Singapore, 19 Sept 2014Singapore Zoo will launch a rhinoceros conservation awareness campaign, titled Rhinos in Trouble: The Hornest Truth, from 20 September to 20 October 2014 to raise awareness about the plight of rhinoceroses in the wild, and is working closely with TRAFFIC Southeast Asia and Wildlife Conservation Society (Vietnam) to stamp out illegal trade of rhino horns.

The month-long campaign is held in conjunction with World Rhino Day, which falls on 22 September. Visitors to Singapore Zoo are encouraged to donate their nail clippings to symbolise their commitment to rhino conservation.

International trade of rhinoceros horn has been illegal since the 80s, yet the market is still thriving today even though science has proven that rhino horn is only as useful as a medicine as human hair and nails are. Rhino horns are made of keratin, the same material found in human hair and nails.

Recent studies by TRAFFIC and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) have revealed that current consumption of products made from rhino horn has gone beyond perceived medicinal purposes. Rhino horn has become a luxury item and a status symbol. With the recent increase in wealthy individuals in Southeast Asia, rhino horn is also being used as a “hangover cure” after excessive alcohol consumption by the affluent.

The year 2013 set a record for rhino poaching in South Africa – home to around 75 per cent of the world’s total rhino population, with 1,004 killed. As of 10 September 2014, poachers had already butchered 769 rhinos in the country. If the current trend continues for the rest of 2014, the number of rhinos killed is likely to exceed record set in 2013 by another 100.

Even in Singapore, where the trade of endangered species and animal parts is strictly regulated, there had been cases where its ports were used as transit points. On 10 January 2014, eight pieces of rhinoceros horns weighing a total of about 21.5kg were confiscated at Changi Airport by the Singapore authorities.

With Rhinos in Trouble: The Hornest Truth, Singapore Zoo hopes to raise public awareness and engage Singaporeans to help in the efforts to save the rhinoceros in the wild.

Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “We urge the public to refuse any rhino horn or rhino horn products should they be offered any, and to please inform all their friends and relatives to do the same. If we don’t buy the product, demand will fall, and rhinoceroses will not suffer needless deaths. Together, we have to, and we can, ensure there is a future for these magnificent creatures.”

In a statement, Mr David Seow, Secretary General of the Singapore Chinese Druggists Association, appeals to Singaporeans to comply with the Government’s ban on the sale of any rhinoceros products and wishes to convey that there are many alternative medicinal material and products that can replace rhinoceros horns. Members of Singapore Chinese Druggists Association also fully support international conservation agreements and efforts to save the rhinoceros from extinction.

Pre-school guests at Singapore Zoo eager to show their support for rhinos lined up to drop their nail clippings into the Jar of Nails. The children, from Odyssey, the Global Pre-school, enjoyed a preview of the Rhinos in Trouble conservation awareness campaign which starts on 20 September 2014. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Pre-school guests at Singapore Zoo eager to show their support for rhinos lined up to drop their nail clippings into the Jar of Nails. The children, from Odyssey, the Global Pre-school, enjoyed a preview of the Rhinos in Trouble conservation awareness campaign which starts on 20 September 2014. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.)

Rhinos in Trouble: The Hornest Truth kick-starts with a public seminar on 20 Sept from 1pm – 5.30pm, and topics include:
– “Rhino Revolution from Africa to Asia” talk by Ms Jennifer Fox, Co-founder and partner, Thornybush Private Game Reserve, South Africa
– “Rhino Horn Trade in Vietnam” talk by Ms Duong Viet Hong, Communications Manager, Wildlife Conservation Society, Vietnam programme
– “Changing minds to save Rhinos: Demand reduction through behaviour change in Vietnam” talk by Dr Naomi Doak, Coordinator, TRAFFIC Southeast Asia, Greater Mekong Programme
The seminar also features a photography exhibition of the critically endangered Sumatran rhino, taken by wildlife photographer Mr Stephen Belcher. Proceeds from the sale of photographs will go towards wildlife conservation efforts.

LIST OF ACTIVITIES FOR RHINOS IN TROUBLE: THE HORNEST TRUTH

Picture1

For more information, visit http://www.zoo.com.sg/events-promos/rhino-month-14.html 
To make your stand against the rhino horn trade, go to www.zoo.com.sg/thehornesttruth

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