DEBUNKING MYTHS ON SPOOKTACULAR ANIMALS

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Creatures of Night Safari join forces to address fables surrounding their dark nature

SINGAPORE, 29 October 2015 — Some creatures in the animal kingdom are associated with myths that leave them with bad reputations. Thoughts of bats, wolves and hyenas often conjure up images of the supernatural world, and give people the shivers! Night Safari’s residents shed light on the truths behind some of these urban legends.

Hyenas are often thought of as lazy scavengers. While they do feed on carrion and scraps left behind by more glamorous predators like lions, they are actually excellent hunters. Relying on endurance, hyenas chase prey over long distances until it is winded, before closing in for the kill. They have one of the greatest bite forces in the animal kingdom and are even capable of bringing down prey over three times their own weight. Look out for Night Safari’s striped and spotted hyenas (pictured above) during the tram experience. The latter, otherwise known as the laughing hyena for its maniacal vocalisation when frustrated, can also be seen along the East Lodge walking trail.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Hyenas are often thought of as lazy scavengers. While they do feed on carrion and scraps left behind by more glamorous predators like lions, they are actually excellent hunters. Relying on endurance, hyenas chase prey over long distances until it is winded, before closing in for the kill. They have one of the greatest bite forces in the animal kingdom and are even capable of bringing down prey over three times their own weight. Look out for Night Safari’s striped and spotted hyenas (pictured above) during the tram experience. The latter, otherwise known as the laughing hyena for its maniacal vocalisation when frustrated, can also be seen along the East Lodge walking trail.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While some cultures associate these nocturnal raptors with witchcraft, sorcery and even death, there are others who believe owls represent wisdom and intelligence. Contrary to popular belief, owls cannot rotate their heads a complete circle. With 14 neck vertebrae, compared to only seven in humans, owls can rotate their heads by 270 degrees in either direction. Equipped with specialised soft-edged flight feathers, even the largest and heaviest of owls, like Night Safari’s Eurasian eagle owl, is capable of flying silently thorough the night sky to swoop down on unsuspecting rodents — an ability that accentuates the mystical aura surrounding them. Marvel at this winged predator along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail.   PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While some cultures associate these nocturnal raptors with witchcraft, sorcery and even death, there are others who believe owls represent wisdom and intelligence. Contrary to popular belief, owls cannot rotate their heads a complete circle. With 14 neck vertebrae, compared to only seven in humans, owls can rotate their heads by 270 degrees in either direction. Equipped with specialised soft-edged flight feathers, even the largest and heaviest of owls, like Night Safari’s Eurasian eagle owl, is capable of flying silently thorough the night sky to swoop down on unsuspecting rodents — an ability that accentuates the mystical aura surrounding them. Marvel at this winged predator along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

It is commonly thought that a porcupine is able to shoot its quills at its predator. While these large, prickly rodents do rely on their quills to protect themselves when threatened, they merely rattle their quills as a first warning. If the hapless predator does not get the hint, the porcupine will erect its quills and ram backwards at its attacker, leaving the latter with a muzzle full of dislodged quills for its trouble. This easily dislodged quills may have given rise to the myth that the quills can be launched from a distance. Encounter two species of these fascinating rodents along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail—the Malayan and Indian-crested porcupines.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

It is commonly thought that a porcupine is able to shoot its quills at its predator. While these large, prickly rodents do rely on their quills to protect themselves when threatened, they merely rattle their quills as a first warning. If the hapless predator does not get the hint, the porcupine will erect its quills and ram backwards at its attacker, leaving the latter with a muzzle full of dislodged quills for its trouble. This easily dislodged quills may have given rise to the myth that the quills can be launched from a distance. Encounter two species of these fascinating rodents along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail—the Malayan and Indian-crested porcupines.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

No thanks to their inverted hanging ways and the misconception that blood is part of their diet, bats are often associated with vampires. In reality, only a small percentage — just three out of over a thousand of the species — actually consume blood. Fruit bats, like Night Safari’s Malayan flying foxes, keep the ecosystem running like clockwork, by contributing to rainforest regrowth through seed dispersal and pollination, which in turn results in hundreds of commercial products and medicines. Bat guano is also known to be a great fertiliser! Walk through Night Safari’s Mangrove Walk for a closer look at these intriguing winged mammals.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

No thanks to their inverted hanging ways and the misconception that blood is part of their diet, bats are often associated with vampires. In reality, only a small percentage — just three out of over a thousand of the species — actually consume blood. Fruit bats, like Night Safari’s Malayan flying foxes, keep the ecosystem running like clockwork, by contributing to rainforest regrowth through seed dispersal and pollination, which in turn results in hundreds of commercial products and medicines. Bat guano is also known to be a great fertiliser! Walk through Night Safari’s Mangrove Walk for a closer look at these intriguing winged mammals.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wolf imagery is abound in mythology and folklore, and one of the first that comes to mind is the legend of the werewolf. While werewolves are synonymous with shape-shifting, a hulking physique and dense fur coat, Night Safari’s Indian wolf is smaller in stature with a short coat and no shape-shifting abilities, although its fur colouration does help it blend with its surroundings! The only thing the Indian wolf has in common with the famed werewolf is its haunting howl, a vocalization to defend their territory and rally the pack. Don’t miss these elusive creatures on Night Safari’s tram experience. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES      SINGAPORE

Wolf imagery is abound in mythology and folklore, and one of the first that comes to mind is the legend of the werewolf. While werewolves are synonymous with shape-shifting, a hulking physique and dense fur coat, Night Safari’s Indian wolf is smaller in stature with a short coat and no shape-shifting abilities, although its fur colouration does help it blend with its surroundings! The only thing the Indian wolf has in common with the famed werewolf is its haunting howl, a vocalization to defend their territory and rally the pack. Don’t miss these elusive creatures on Night Safari’s tram experience.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

GET TO KNOW ANIMALS NATIVE TO SINGAPORE AT NIGHT SAFARI THIS SEPTEMBER

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Local visitors enjoy 50% discount on admission from Sundays to Thursdays as part of SG50 celebrations

Night Safari is home to two Sunda slow lorises, a nocturnal and arboreal primate native to Singapore with an extremely slow metabolic rate. Due to its attractive appearance, the slow loris is greatly threatened by the pet trade, even though its bite is known to be venomous. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Night Safari is home to two Sunda slow lorises, a nocturnal and arboreal primate native to Singapore with an extremely slow metabolic rate. Due to its attractive appearance, the slow loris is greatly threatened by the pet trade, even though its bite is known to be venomous. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

25 August 2015, SINGAPORE – As Singapore celebrates her 50th anniversary of independence, take a walk on the wild side at Night Safari and get to know animals native to the island, like the Sunda slow loris, Sunda pangolin, mousedeer, and the elusive wild colugo.

Better known as Sang Kancil in Malay folklore, lesser mousedeer are the world’s smallest hoofed mammal. Look out for them along Night Safari’s Fishing Cat Trail. Mousedeer reach sexual maturity at five to six months, and females have been known to give birth to a single offspring at any time of year. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Better known as Sang Kancil in Malay folklore, lesser mousedeer are the world’s smallest hoofed mammal. Look out for them along Night Safari’s Fishing Cat Trail. Mousedeer reach sexual maturity at five to six months, and females have been known to give birth to a single offspring at any time of year. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “In heavily urbanised Singapore, few people know about our island’s wilder side and the fascinating indigenous species that inhabit our wild places. As we celebrate 50 years of achievements since independence, it is also a good time to appreciate that much of our natural heritage is precious and worthy of our conservation. In Night Safari, one of Singapore’s inventions and gifts to the world, many of these creatures can be observed in comfort and safety. Some of these are part of our collection, some are wild denizens such as the colugos.”

Night Safari has earned the distinction of being the first in the world to exhibit and breed the critically-endangered Sunda pangolin. Three babies have been successfully bred in the park since the exhibit opened in 2009. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Night Safari has earned the distinction of being the first in the world to exhibit and breed the critically-endangered Sunda pangolin. Three babies have been successfully bred in the park since the exhibit opened in 2009. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Zoogeographically, Singapore is part of the Sunda biodiversity hotspot, which means it has a very high number of species and they are found nowhere else in the world. It is imperative to protect native flora and fauna to keep the balance of nature. The more an individual understands the natural world, the stronger the push to safeguard the habitat for future generations. Through the years, Night Safari has helped to protect native species through several initiatives including the Common Palm Civet Project, which started in 2009 to mitigate the escalating human-civet conflict. Night Safari also hosted the ‘Scaling up Pangolin Conservation’ conference in 2013 to map out solutions for the global decline of pangolins.

If a trek through a jungle does not appeal, then traipse down to Night Safari—the world’s first wildlife park created to allow observation of wildlife at night —for a wildly exciting journey to spot, learn and appreciate the denizens of Singapore’s local forests.

Another interesting indigenous species is the Malayan porcupine, which can be found along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail. In Singapore, it has been recently recorded on Pulau Tekong. This prickly rodent is known to rattle its quills when startled or excited. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Another interesting indigenous species is the Malayan porcupine, which can be found along Night Safari’s Leopard Trail. In Singapore, it has been recently recorded on Pulau Tekong. This prickly rodent is known to rattle its quills when startled or excited. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Local residents enjoy 50% admission discounts from Sundays to Thursdays in September. For more information and terms and conditions, visit www.nightsafari.com.sg

WILD WAYS TO BEAT THE HEAT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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Orang utans, hippos and other wild friends share tips on how to stay cool this summer

Singapore, 30 June 2015 — With temperatures soaring this summer, Singapore Zoo’s residents are taking every precaution to beat the heat, and engage in cool practices. Practical advice like wearing sunscreen and novel ways of staying heat-free are given a wild twist, courtesy of our animal friends.

Tip 1: Cover up!  If, like Satria, Singapore Zoo’s Sumatran orang utan, you just can’t bear to leave your coat at home, employ an equally fashionable gunny sack to seek refuge from the scorching sun. For human visitors, a scarf or an umbrella will work just as well. And don’t forget the sunglasses!  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 1: Cover up!
If, like Satria, Singapore Zoo’s Sumatran orang utan, you just can’t bear to leave your coat at home, employ an equally fashionable gunny sack to seek refuge from the scorching sun. For human visitors, a scarf or an umbrella will work just as well. And don’t forget the sunglasses!
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 2: Make a splash!  Omar, Singapore Zoo’s white tiger, does it the simplest way – by spending the day creating big splashes in his pool. Not only will sloshing about in the water keep you cool, we hear it’s rather therapeutic as well.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 2: Make a splash!
Omar, Singapore Zoo’s white tiger, does it the simplest way – by spending the day creating big splashes in his pool. Not only will sloshing about in the water keep you cool, we hear it’s rather therapeutic as well.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 3: Slather on sunscreen (like it’s free) Bora, our white rhinoceros, says there’s nothing better than sloshing in some glorious mud to stay cool and keep away sunburns (and parasites!). Human friends, even if the sun’s behind the clouds, apply generous amounts of sunscreen to protect your skin from UV rays when exploring Singapore Zoo.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 3: Slather on sunscreen (like it’s free)
Bora, our white rhinoceros, says there’s nothing better than sloshing in some glorious mud to stay cool and keep away sunburns (and parasites!). Human friends, even if the sun’s behind the clouds, apply generous amounts of sunscreen to protect your skin from UV rays when exploring Singapore Zoo.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 4: Share a popsicle  Singapore Zoo’s Asian elephant Jati’s got her trunk wrapped around a mammoth popsicle – a perfect and fun antidote for soaring temperatures. And it looks like Gambir wants a piece of the action too! Share an ice cream or icy slush with your friends today.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 4: Share a popsicle
Singapore Zoo’s Asian elephant Jati’s got her trunk wrapped around a mammoth popsicle – a perfect and fun antidote for soaring temperatures. And it looks like Gambir wants a piece of the action too! Share an ice cream or icy slush with your friends today.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 5: Keep your head under water Singapore Zoo’s pair of pygmy hippopotamus has the right idea; follow their lead and submerge yourself in a pool of cool water to escape the mugginess. Hippos have been known to stay underwater for up to six minutes!  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 5: Keep your head under water
Singapore Zoo’s pair of pygmy hippopotamus has the right idea; follow their lead and submerge yourself in a pool of cool water to escape the mugginess. Hippos have been known to stay underwater for up to six minutes!
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 6: If all else fails, wait it out (or move to Night Safari!) Instead of fighting the heat, Night Safari’s pride of Asiatic lions prefers to wait till twilight before indulging in their daily activities. In fact, 90 per cent of tropical species come out at night when it's cooler. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Tip 6: If all else fails, wait it out (or move to Night Safari!)
Instead of fighting the heat, Night Safari’s pride of Asiatic lions prefers to wait till twilight before indulging in their daily activities. In fact, 90 per cent of tropical species come out at night when it’s cooler.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

RUB OFF SOME GOAT LUCK AT SINGAPORE ZOO AND NIGHT SAFARI THIS LUNAR NEW YEAR

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Eight auspicious goat kids born in Singapore Zoo and exotic goat species in Night Safari will greet visitors

Singapore Zoo keepers Mohd Hanafi and Amy Chandra show off three of the newest members of Singapore Zoo’s domestic goat herd which arrived just in time to usher in the Year of the Goat. Since 1 Jan 2015, Singapore Zoo has welcomed eight baby goats. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo keepers Mohd Hanafi and Amy Chandra show off three of the newest members of Singapore Zoo’s domestic goat herd which arrived just in time to usher in the Year of the Goat. Since 1 Jan 2015, Singapore Zoo has welcomed eight baby goats. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 11 February 2015 – Usher in the Year of the Goat at Singapore Zoo and Night Safari to marvel at the beauty and grace of this year’s zodiac animal, and learn all about the elegant species.

Singapore Zoo

Originating in Egypt, the domestic goat can now be found, either farmed or feral, in every continent except Antarctica. Goats are able to thrive in almost any habitat including savanna, deserts, scrub forests and mountains. This Chinese New Year, learn more about goats and their wild cousins at the Goat Awareness booth at Singapore Zoo. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Originating in Egypt, the domestic goat can now be found, either farmed or feral, in every continent except Antarctica. Goats are able to thrive in almost any habitat including savanna, deserts, scrub forests and mountains. This Chinese New Year, learn more about goats and their wild cousins at the Goat Awareness booth at Singapore Zoo. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo has welcomed the birth of eight goat kids in the last two months, an auspicious sign of a bountiful year to come. The gamboling goat kids are looking forward to charming visitors to Singapore Zoo this festive season as part of the Chinese New Year celebrations.

Visitors looking to rub off some goat luck can capture some precious shots with this year’s zodiac animal, watch goat enrichment, or feed the goats. In addition, children can learn more about goats and their wild cousins at a specially curated Goat Awareness Booth. All goat-themed Chinese New Year activities will run from 18-22 February.

For activity details, visit Chinese New Year Celebrations at Singapore Zoo.

Night Safari

The ‘snake-horned’ markhor is named for their spiraling horns, which can grow up to 160cm, that adorn the males’ heads. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

The ‘snake-horned’ markhor is named for their spiraling horns, which can grow up to 160cm, that adorn the males’ heads. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Over at Night Safari, visitors can marvel at the wilder cousins of the domestic goats – the ‘snakehorned’ markhor, handsome Himalayan tahr, ‘blue’ bharal and rare mouflon.

The Himalayan tahr thrives on rugged alpine mountains from northern India to Bhutan, and male tahrs have a long shaggy mane in winter. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

The Himalayan tahr thrives on rugged alpine mountains from northern India to Bhutan, and male tahrs have a long shaggy mane in winter. This species are threatened by habitat loss in their native environments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

While only the markhor and tahr are considered true goats, the bharal and mouflon are wild sheep that are no less nimble and sure-footed, making their homes in mountainous and rocky regions. These wild goats and sheep can be encountered along the Night Safari tram route.

For activity details, visit Chinese New Year Celebrations at Night Safari

The goats in Mandai enjoy the centre stage and look forward to welcoming visitors over the Lunar New Year holidays.

ANIMAL FRIENDS WISH ONE AND ALL A PROSPEROUS LUNAR NEW YEAR

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Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo usher in the Year of the Goat with festive activities from 18 to 22 Feb 2015

Take photos with Singapore Zoo’s new kids on the block at selected timings during the Lunar New Year.  Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Take photos with Singapore Zoo’s new kids on the block at selected timings during the Lunar New Year. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

4 February 2015, Singapore – This Lunar New Year, usher in the Year of the Goat with wild animal friends at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo and take part in a herd of activities from 18 to 22 February.

Be greeted by an a-baa-ndance of surprises as the parks get decked out for the Lunar New Year with creative plant displays, festive animal enrichment and up-close encounters, and photo moments with adorable baby goats! Be sure to catch the acrobatic lion dance performances and meet the prosperity mascots.

Animal Encounters
Goat Kids Photography at Singapore Zoo: Be charmed by the boisterous and adorable herd of young goats at Singapore Zoo, and witness an entourage of six baby goats (called kids) prancing alongside their keepers against the scenic backdrop of Upper Seletar Reservoir. Be sure to snap a souvenir shot with this year’s zodiac animal!

Wings of Asia Tour at Jurong Bird Park: Tour the park’s latest attraction and discover threatened species such as the beautiful Bali mynah and Luzon bleeding-heart dove, in an aviary featuring one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of Asian birds. Stand a chance to win ang pows during a Q&A session at the end of the 15-minute tour.

Festive High Flyers Show at Jurong Bird Park: Lucky visitors will receive red packets delivered by Sassy the sulphur-crested cockatoo, and well-wishes of ‘Gong Xi Fa Cai’ from Amigo the yellow-naped Amazon.

River Safari’s squirrel monkeys get into the festive mood with ang pows filled with treats this Lunar New Year. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

River Safari’s squirrel monkeys get into the festive mood with ang pows filled with treats this Lunar New Year. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Festive Animal Enrichment
Special treats for the animals serve as enrichment and encourage them to display their natural behaviours. If you’re lucky, you can catch them at their best as they chomp, dig, and crunch their way through their festive delights.

Jurong Bird Park: Fly in to the Breeding and Research Centre to watch ‘bird nannies’ giving young parrots enrichment such as ang pows filled with treats and oranges.

Night Safari: Look out for Asian elephants, Malayan tapirs and Indian rhinos enjoying festive goodies during the tram ride. Then trek the walking trails and peer at Himalayan tahrs, Malayan tigers, fishing cats, common palm civets and wallabies as they uncover hidden treats.

River Safari: Catch the cute antics of giant pandas, red pandas, crab-eating macaques and squirrel monkeys as they receive giant ang pows.

Southern Lion Dance
A pair of spectacular Southern lions will shimmy their way atop high poles in a high-octane performance at Jurong Bird Park, River Safari and Singapore Zoo. As the sun sets, a pair of dazzling LED-lit Southern lions will light up the sky at Night Safari. This traditional mix of martial art, acrobatic and stage performance was introduced to Southeast Asia more than a century ago, and remains a mainstay of Lunar New Year celebrations.

Prosperity Mascot Appearances
No Lunar New Year is complete without good fortune from the prosperity mascots! Fu Lu Shou and the God of Fortune will make appearances at the four wildlife parks. Visitors at River Safari can also look out for Kai Kai, Jia Jia, red panda and golden pheasant mascots in their festive finery, as they spread the joy with 88 lucky ang pows daily.

Spin the Wheel at River Safari
Don’t miss out on the chance to win attractive prizes at River Safari! Simply present your admission ticket for an opportunity to spin the wheel, with a total of 88 prizes to be won daily.

For more information on activity details, please visit Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo.

BIRTH OF ENDANGERED ASIAN LION CUBS ROUND UP NIGHT SAFARI’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY WITH A ROAR

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Birth of two more cubs makes it a dozen babies in total for prolific Asian lion pair;

Only 300 Asian lions remain in India’s Gir Forest, the only place where they are found in the wild

Baring its full set of small but sharp teeth, this feisty little Asian lion cub is all set to roar into the new year, as part of the pride of 13 Asian lions that calls Night Safari home. The as-yet-unnamed cub is one of two Asian lion babies born on 27 September 2014. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Baring its full set of small but sharp teeth, this feisty little Asian lion cub is all set to roar into the new year, as part of the pride of 13 Asian lions that calls Night Safari home. The as-yet-unnamed cub is one of two Asian lion babies born on 27 September 2014. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Singapore, 9 December 2014 – As a sweet finale to Night Safari’s 20th anniversary this year, endangered Asian lion residents Khapat and Amba gifted the park with two Asian lion cubs, making them the 11th and 12th babies to be born to their prolific parents.

Born on 27 September, the tawny male and female pair was sexed, microchipped and given a round of vaccinations during their veterinary checkup in late November. Visitors can look out for them in upcoming months, when they will be introduced to their older siblings in the Asian lion exhibit along Night Safari’s tram route. For now, they are spending time bonding with mom in the cubbing den at a back of house facility.

One of the newest members of Night Safari’s Asian lion pride bares its teeth to demonstrate its mettle. The cub, one of two born on 27 September 2014, is currently bonding with mom in a back of house facility, but will be introduced to the Asian lion exhibit along Night Safari’s tram route in upcoming months. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

One of the newest members of Night Safari’s Asian lion pride bares its teeth to demonstrate its mettle. The cub, one of two born on 27 September 2014, is currently bonding with mom in a back of house facility, but will be introduced to the Asian lion exhibit along Night Safari’s tram route in upcoming months. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “It’s always heartening to welcome new babies into our collection, especially at a time when many of the world’s wildlife species are being threatened as a direct result of human-related activities. These births are a valuable addition to an assurance colony of Asian lions under human care, and will help to safeguard against extinction in the wild.

Dr Ng Weng Yan, veterinarian, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, holds the male cub still to take its weight, as part of a health check. The cub weighed close to 8kg at two months, while his sister is a little lighter at approximately 6.8kg. Aside from being sexed for the first time, the cubs were also vaccinated and microchipped for identification.  Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Dr Ng Weng Yan, veterinarian, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, holds the male cub still to take its weight, as part of a health check. The cub weighed close to 8kg at two months, while his sister is a little lighter at approximately 6.8kg. Aside from being sexed for the first time, the cubs were also vaccinated and microchipped for identification.
Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

The Asian lion is a separate subspecies from the African lion. Listed as endangered under the IUCN* Red List, it is smaller in size and sports a less significant mane compared to its African cousin. Most of the wild Asian lion population is found in India’s Gir Forest, a protected sanctuary where about 300 of these magnificent animals roam. Additionally, close to 340 Asian lions live in zoos. Night Safari has 13 lions in its pride, the fourth largest collection under human care.

Night Safari hopes that it will be able to contribute to Asian lion numbers, both wild and under human care, through its captive breeding programme. To date, Night Safari has successfully bred twelve Asian lion cubs, one of which was sent to Denmark’s Aalborg Zoo last June, as part of an animal exchange programme.

Award-winning Night Safari, the world’s first safari park for nocturnal animals, officially celebrated her 20th anniversary in May this year.

*IUCN: International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

PUMPKIN TREATS, UP-CLOSE ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS AND FREE ADMISSION FOR KIDS AT RIVER SAFARI’S INAUGURAL SAFARI BOO

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Safari Boo @River Safari - Red panda pumpkin treats 2 Safari Boo @River Safari - Giant panda pumpkin treats

Images 1 to 3: Animal residents at River Safari (from left: red panda and giant panda) enjoying pumpkins filled with their favourite treats as part of a special enrichment programme during the daytime Safari Boo festivities in October and November. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

SINGAPORE, 17 October 2014 – It was a night of wild trick-or-treat fun as close to 200 invited guests enjoyed a closed-door preview of River Safari’s first Safari Boo. Costume-clad visitors, including 60 preschoolers, were treated to a special animal presentation on creepy crawlies, up-close animal encounters, a host of mythical creatures as well as an after-dark experience with the park’s river monsters.
Held over five days on Oct 22, 25, 26 & Nov 1 and 2, Safari Boo festivities take place from 6pm to 9pm (last admission at 8pm). Kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm and are encouraged to dress up for this merry-not-scary event to stand a chance to win in a costume contest.
Safari Boo festivities include interactive discovery stations where little ones can play archaeologist and uncover animal bones to solve mysteries. Those brave for some scaly encounters can feel the unique body covering of animals such as the pangolin and arapaima, and find out why these animals are threatened because of their scales.
For more information, visit www.riversafari.com.sg/safariboo

Safari Boo @River Safari - Bearded dragon at River Talk Myths & Legends Safari Boo @River Safari - Pygmy hedgehog at River Talk Myths & Legends

Images 4 & 5: As part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November, visitors can expect up-close encounters with animals such as the bearded dragon (left) and pygmy hedgehog (right) in a special animal presentation titled “River Talk: Myths and Legends”. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Image 6: Learn more about the scales of animals such as the pangolin and snake and find out why they are threatened at the “Scaly Encounters” booth at Safari Boo. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Image 6: Learn more about the scales of animals such as the pangolin and snake and find out why they are threatened at the “Scaly Encounters” booth at Safari Boo. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm.
Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Image 7: Kai Kai & Jia Jia mascots all decked out in their Safari Boo best as they surprise little ones with trick-or-treat bags as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November.  Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Image 7: Kai Kai & Jia Jia mascots all decked out in their Safari Boo best as they surprise little ones with trick-or-treat bags as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November.
Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Image 8: Mystical characters such as the mermaid come alive in the Enchanted Trail as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Image 8: Mystical characters such as the mermaid come alive in the Enchanted Trail as part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November. Safari Boo is River Safari’s first trick-or-treat event where kids aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm.
Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

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