ENJOY AN EGGY DAY OUT IN JURONG BIRD PARK

Weekend carnival hosts behind-the-scenes tours, celebrity tours, photographic trails and egg hunt. Kids receive 50% off admission.

A salmon-crested cockatoo chick at Jurong Bird Park’s Breeding & Research Centre, whom visitors will get to name in Game for a Name, part of the gamut of activities during Eggy Day Out.
A salmon-crested cockatoo chick at Jurong Bird Park’s Breeding & Research Centre, whom visitors will get to name in Game for a Name, part of the gamut of activities during Eggy Day Out.

Singapore, 10 April 2014 – To commemorate 50 years of tourism development and promotions in Singapore and to thank Singaporeans for their support, Jurong Bird Park hatches the inaugural Eggy Day Out from 18-20 April for Singapore residents to discover little known aspects of the park.

The Eggy Day Out carnival weekend features a plethora of eggs-periential activities, including:

  • Lory Loft Behind-the-Scenes Tour which highlights the colourful lories and how their unique feed is prepared.
  • Memories Trail, led by Jurong Bird Park’s General Manager who will bring participants down memory lane and share how the park has evolved through his 38-year experience as a veteran.
  • Junior Eggs-pert Tour that showcases how eggs are incubated and a bird’s life stages at the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC).
  • Celebrity Eggs-cursion, in which personalities like MediaCorp Artistes Bryan Wong, MediaCorp Class 95FM DJ Glenn Ong, MediaCorp Gold 90.5FM DJ The Flying Dutchman and MediaCorp Love 97.2FM DJ Leelian Chua will lead tours at Waterfall Aviary / South East Asian Birds Aviary.
As part of Eggs-periment during Jurong Bird Park’s Eggy Day Out, participants will learn about the floating egg phenomenon, amongst other fun scientific experiments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE
As part of Eggs-periment during Jurong Bird Park’s Eggy Day Out, participants will learn about the floating egg phenomenon, amongst other fun scientific experiments. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

To top it all, children between the ages of 3-12 years will enjoy 50% discount on admission tickets during Eggy Day Out by flashing a coupon that can be downloaded from www.birdpark.com.sg/eggydayout between 10-20 April. In addition to this, holders of Feather Friends, Friends of Night Safari, Friends of River Safari and Friends of the Zoo membership cards are entitled to five complimentary child admission tickets when they purchase up to five adult tickets from 18-20 April.

Over at River Safari, the park is introducing two behind-the-scenes tours:

  • Fishy Business, a brand new tour which showcases the complex life support systems in the Amazon Flooded Forest.
  • Be a Panda Researcher, where visitors learn to identify panda tracks and examine panda poo and paw prints, and discover ways we can save them from extinction.

Those hungry for more can head to Singapore Zoo for Animals in the Pink, which offers a peek into the park’s Central Kitchen and world-class animal hospital or Spineless & Successful, where visitors will discover how breeding and maintenance work is conducted for butterflies, scorpions, stick insects and other invertebrates.

Activity details (Jurong Bird Park)
All activities are free of charge unless otherwise stated. Registration is needed for some activities at www.birdpark.com.sg/eggydayout or at the Activities Registration Booth at Penguin Coast. Park admission charges apply.

Activity details (River Safari)

Activity details (Singapore Zoo)

For more information about Eggy Day Out and the discounts, please visit www.birdpark.com.sg/eggydayout.

JURONG BIRD PARK ACHIEVES A GLOBAL FIRST WITH THREE WILD ORIENTAL PIED HORNBILL EGGS SUCCESSFULLY INCUBATED

Number of wild Oriental Pied Hornbills in Singapore increase ten-fold since 2005 through joint conservation efforts.

3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. All three chicks eat 11, eight and four days old respectively. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.
3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. All three chicks eat 11, eight and four days old respectively. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.
3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. Chicks at 24 days old, 20 days old and 16 days old. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.
3 Oriental pied hornbill eggs were rescued from Pulau Ubin and brought to Jurong Bird Park. Chicks at 24 days old, 20 days old and 16 days old. This is the first time globally OPH eggs from the wild have been successfully artificially incubated.

Singapore, 08 March 2013 – In a global first, three Oriental Pied Hornbill eggs rescued from Pulau Ubin have been successfully incubated and hatched at Jurong Bird Park’s Breeding & Research Centre.

“This is the first time Oriental Pied Hornbills have been successfully artificially incubated, and it represents a big step in the conservation of these magnificent creatures native to Singapore and South East Asia,” said Dr Luis Carlos Neves, DVM, Assistant Director, Avian, Jurong Bird Park. “Oriental Pied Hornbills have very unique breeding behavior wherein the female seals herself into a tree cavity to lay eggs and raise the chicks. It is extremely challenging to artificially incubate these eggs, and it is rarely attempted. The fact that we have succeeded is good news for the global avian community as there is currently very limited data on these fascinating birds.”

The three rescued eggs had been abandoned by their mother. On 7 January, Rangers from National Parks Board (NParks) on Pulau Ubin found a nest with a broken seal, and after it was ascertained that the female hornbill had abandoned the nest, the eggs were sent to Jurong Bird Park where they were artificially incubated.

Jurong Bird Park welcomed the first hornbill chick hatchling on 25 January, weighing 22.6g. The second chick hatched 3 days later on 28 January, weighing 21.8g. The last chick hatched on 1 February, at 20g.

After the chicks hatched, they were fed six times a day, on a diet consisting of a mixture of fruit and dried insects. At a month old, they are fed thrice a day, but with an increase in fruit and commercial avian pellets.

Although listed as Least Concern on the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) red list, Oriental Pied Hornbills were not seen in Singapore for 140 years prior to 1994. The last sighting formally recorded was in 1855 by Alfred Russell Wallace. There were various inconclusive sightings over the following years. In 1994, a pair of wild hornbills was sighted on Pulau Ubin. Three years later, the first breeding record of hornbills was observed on Pulau Ubin. By 2005, there were about 10 individuals in the wild. That same year, a collaborative study between Jurong Bird Park, NParks and Singapore Avian Conservation Project was initiated with the intention to study the breeding and conservation of these birds.

With the knowledge gained from observing these birds in the Bird Park, artificial nest boxes were introduced to Pulau Ubin, which greatly increased the breeding of the Oriental Pied Hornbills. During the length of the five year project, Oriental Pied Hornbill numbers in the wild increased from around 10 individuals to 50 individuals. Today there are between 75 – 100 wild Oriental Pied Hornbills in Singapore.

“In addition to being able to marvel at these beautiful birds which are part of the Singaporean heritage, the significant increase in Oriental Pied Hornbill numbers in the wild means that Singapore has more natural fruit dispersers. These mid-sized birds regurgitate some fruit whole, while other fruit are dropped along the way before they are eaten. In this manner, the birds reach areas in Singapore which are untouched and even unknown, helping to re-populate the island with fruit trees,” noted Dr Luis Carlos Neves.

Jurong Bird Park has one of the largest collections of hornbills globally, with 17 species represented. The Park has 16 Oriental Pied Hornbills, some of which can be seen at the Hornbills & Toucans exhibit. During breeding season which takes place from November to March, cameras will be installed in the Oriental Pied Hornbill exhibit, and visitors can catch a glimpse of nesting activities through television screens placed at the exhibit.

For more information about Jurong Bird Park, please visit www.birdpark.com.sg.

NINE IN 10 STARS OF NEWLY LAUNCHED HIGH FLYERS SHOW HATCHED AND RAISED IN JURONG BIRD PARK

Singapore, 2 January 2013 – The breeding programme at Jurong Bird Park has been such a success that at least 95% of all the birds in the new High Flyers Show are hatched and raised in the Park.

“We are very proud of our breeding successes and having no lack of ‘local’ talent in the new Show. We feel like proud parents when we see these birds which we have hand raised from young showcasing their abilities to our guests from all over the world, and in doing so, inculcate in them an appreciation of conservation and avian life,” said Mr Raja Segran, General Manager, Jurong Bird Park.

The first show in Jurong Bird Park began 30 years ago, and was helmed by birds like Big John and Sammy the cockatoos, Rod Stewart the Egyptian vulture and Harry the hornbill. At that time, 30% of the birds in the Show were home-grown, with the rest acquired via exchanges with other institutions. The establishment of the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC) six years after the first show greatly boosted the Park’s avian numbers. On average, more than 300 chicks annually have successfully hatched at the BRC over the past 24 years.

“Whenever possible, we leave the eggs to the parents to incubate and raise, but in certain instances where the parent had a history of breaking their own eggs, or are young parents, is when we step in and bring the eggs to the BRC for hand-rearing. Eventually, some of these birds are used in the Show.” continued Mr Raja Segran.

Three birds from the Show did not hatch in Bird Park, but one of them came to be part of the Show through an interesting twist of events. When the BRC underwent renovation in 2011, workers found three barn owls residing in the darkest corner of the roof of the BRC. They hatched under the BRC’s roof, and their parents took off during the construction period. Keepers took the barn owl chicks under their wing and cared for them until they were ready to fledge. One of the chicks is affectionately named Mystic, and it will show off its prowess as a silent hunter of the night as it swoops to bring down a prey. The other two birds which did not hatch in Bird Park are Amigo and Quincy, both yellow-naped Amazons which are renowned for their ability at mimicry.

Be sure to make a date with ‘local’ talent of the feathered variety at the High Flyers show which happens twice daily, at 11.00am and 3.00pm at the Pools Amphitheatre in Jurong Bird Park. Normal admission applies to Jurong Bird Park (Adults $20; Child $13), but there is no fee required to watch the High Flyers Show.

Mystic, the barn owl which became part of the High Flyers Show after it was found abandoned in the Breeding & Research Centre’s roof
Mystic, the barn owl which became part of the High Flyers Show after it was found abandoned
in the Breeding & Research Centre’s roof
High Flyers Show’s finale, with more than 100 birds on stage.
High Flyers Show’s finale, with more than 100 birds on stage.

WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE CELEBRATES NATION’S BIRTHDAY

AUGUST BABIES ENTER FREE AT JURONG BIRD PARK AND SINGAPORE ZOO

Singapore, 30 Jul 2012 – Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s parks will be celebrating the nation’s birthday with a month-long promotion in August. Singaporeans and Permanent Residents born in the same month as Singapore will be offered free admission at Jurong Bird Park and Singapore Zoo. To redeem, simply flash your identification card at the respective ticketing counters.

Details at a glance:
Date: 1 – 31 August 2012
Time: 8:30am – 6:00pm
Venue: Singapore Zoo and Jurong Bird Park

Terms and conditions:
• Valid from 1 – 31 Aug 2012
• Valid for Singaporeans and Permanent Residents only
• Proof of identity required
• Not valid with other offers and online purchase. Redemption valid at point of purchase only
• Promotion is only valid at Jurong Bird Park and Singapore Zoo
• Offer is not exchangeable for cash
• Does not include tram ride at Jurong Bird Park and Singapore Zoo

National Day is the perfect time to spend with loved ones, so why not make it a family affair with our array of activities for every age?

Jurong Bird Park Highlights
Take the kids to the Birdz of Play area at Jurong Bird Park, where they can flap their imaginary wings at Singapore’s only bird-themed playground. Cool off in the tropical heat at the wet play area, which even comes with a giant tipping bucket that will get them wet and wild!

Fancy an educational but equally fun activity? Take them to the newly opened Breeding & Research Centre, where you’ll find out all about the breeding and nursing processes that take place at the Bird Park.

Explore the various delights that the Bird Park has to offer, from the majestic African Waterfall Aviary with over 1,000 free-flying native African birds to the Lory Loft, where birds will quite literally eat out of your hands! Also not to be missed is the Kings of the Skies show, which will take you back in time to appreciate the ancient medieval art of falconry.

Have these colourful winged wonders quite literally eating out of your hands at the Bird Park’s Lory loft.
The newly opened Birdz of Play offers hours of splashing-good fun!

Singapore Zoo Highlights
Make getting up early a joyous affair with Singapore Zoo’s Jungle Breakfast with Wildlife. This programme allows visitors to come up close and personal to animals such as elephants and orang utans, or even pet a snake – all this while enjoying a sumptuous buffet breakfast with an international spread. After filling yourselves up, embark on a journey into the world’s best rainforest zoo, with open-concept exhibits that allow you to come even closer to nature.

Dine alongside animals like the orang utan at Singapore Zoo’s Jungle Breakfast with Wildlife programme.

Watch our orang utans having fun at their free-ranging exhibit – the largest of its kind in the world. Equipped with vines and branches to allow them to swing around freely, the exhibit also has platforms and hammocks, which stimulate these highly intelligent apes mentally. Step into the Fragile Forest, where you’ll be greeted by creatures such as ring-tailed lemurs, flying foxes, mousedeer and sloths, all at arms-length!

Watch our free-ranging orang utans live and play at their exhibit.
Come up close to our Madagascar natives, the ring-tailed lemurs at the Fragile Forest.

RARE BLUE AND BLACK PARROT BEAUTIES MAKE THEIR DEBUT AND CALL JURONG BIRD PARK HOME

Blue-throated macaw hatchling. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 21 May 2012 – Two critically endangered blue-throated macaws, three red-tailed black cockatoos and four endangered hyacinth macaws have hatched at the Jurong Bird Park’s Breeding & Research Centre (BRC). These nine breeding successes, ages ranging from three to nine months, are part of the Bird Park’s carefully managed breeding programme.

The blue-throated macaw siblings are the first ever hatchlings of this species at the Park. They hatched on 17 and 23 December last year after an incubation period of 26 days at the BRC, which is a dedicated area to ensure the welfare, breeding and promulgation of birdlife. Weighing in at 14 g and 15 g at hatching, blue-throated macaws are difficult to breed in captivity, as compatibility is an important requirement for them with regards to the environment and their breeding partner.

It took seven years of persistent research by the avicultural team at the BRC and the Avian Hospital before two fertile eggs were laid, and even more care went into ensuring that the chicks had a diet optimised for their species and their growth. When they hatched, they were fed with baby formula and were gradually introduced to a diet of various fruit such as apples, pears, papayas, and bananas, nuts such as walnuts, macadamia nuts and sunflower seeds at three months.

Although listed as Least Concern on the IUCN, the red-tailed black cockatoo is prohibited from export from Australia, making this species extremely rare in captivity. This is also the first time Jurong Bird Park has successfully bred them in captivity. The three siblings hatched in three different clutches last year, with one egg per clutch on 2 August, 9 September and 20 October.

Before fertile eggs could be laid, endoscopy was performed by the veterinarian to ensure that the breeding pair was healthy, and was ready for breeding. The BRC team also changed the nest for them by providing the birds with a log with a cavity, instead of a wooden nest box. The birds are now in the new Australian themed exhibit at Parrot Paradise, which houses seven cockatoo species endemic to Australia.

Hyacinth macaws were last bred in the Bird Park in May 2010. This breeding season, three clutches of four eggs produced four sibling chicks hatching between November 2011 and April 2012. Similarly with the red-tailed black cockatoo, endoscopy was also carried out prior to breeding. For the parents of these chicks, a veterinary check revealed that their fat intake needed to be increased to get the birds in prime breeding condition, so walnuts and macadamias were added to their diet during the breeding season.

“We are so thrilled to have a 100% success rate with the blue-throated macaw, red-tailed black cockatoo and the hyacinth macaw this breeding season. In particular, there are only about 100 – 150 blue throated macaws left in the wilds of north-central Bolivia, and we hope that they will be valuable additions to the global captive breeding population of blue-throated macaws,” noted Mr Raja Segran, General Manager, Jurong Bird Park.

ORCHARD’S 1.3M EGG-PIC MOMENT

Shoppers to Orchard Road today were greeted with an egg-pic photo opportunity from Jurong Bird Park – a 1.3m tall giant egg in hot pink sunglasses with feet and wings in a deck chair under a beach umbrella.

A roving exhibit for today and tomorrow, the giant egg being egg-cellently pampered getting a pedicure and feathers being groomed was showcased at the areas outside H&M, Mandarin Gallery, Takashimaya and Paragon from 2pm to 6pm. A traffic-stopping moment, many gawking shoppers whipped out their cameras and phones for photographs.

This is a tongue-in-chick look at how the Breeding & Research Centre (BRC) in Jurong Bird Park takes eggs-treme care of the many eggs and chicks under their charge. Today, the BRC opened its’ doors to guests, to instill a deeper appreciation of wildlife. There are eight areas (incubation rooms, nurseries, weaning rooms and a kitchen) through which guests can take a peek at the eggs and chicks as they mature through life’s stages. Guests also get a chance to watch a live streaming feed of avian nest activities at the Breeding Blocks which are not publicly accessible.

Heads up! Looking chic in town.
Queenly carried across Orchard Road, the eggs-pert pampering knows no bounds!
As busy Orchard bustles by, the giant egg takes a chill pill in her deck chair whilst being combed and pedicured.
Oblivious to the glare of the afternoon sun, the giant egg basks comfortably while a passer-by shields herself.
A picture perfect moment as her partner snaps away.
Look mum! I can eggs-pertly pamper the egg too!
After an egg-cellent afternoon of being pampered, the giant egg gets escorted off into the sunset.