NEW STRIPES, SPOTS AND A MANE EVENT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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Charismatic additions to cat collection are getting preened to welcome visitors

Singapore Zoo’s new white tigers Pasha (below) and Keysa (above) enjoy an afternoon prowl in their habitat as part of a conditioning session to get them settled in their new home. The two-year-old brother and sister pair are part of an animal exchange programme with Indonesia’s Maharani Zoo. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo’s new white tigers Pasha (below) and Keysa (above) enjoy an afternoon prowl in their habitat as part of a conditioning session to get them settled in their new home. The two-year-old brother and sister pair are part of an animal exchange programme with Indonesia’s Maharani Zoo. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore, 3 March 2015 – Cat lovers are in for a roaring fur-filled experience as Singapore Zoo introduces a flurry of felines in the coming months. The new additions will include white tigers, cheetahs and an African lion.

First to make their public debut will be white tiger siblings Pasha and Keysa. The duo arrived from Indonesia’s Maharani Zoo on 15 January this year, and has since completed their month-long quarantine period. They are now being conditioned to the exhibit most afternoons, and spend their time sniffing and stalking every inch of the habitat. Once keepers are confident they are comfortable in their new home, they will be displayed on a regular basis.

Pasha the white tiger pauses to enjoy a sip of water, before continuing to explore his new habitat at Singapore Zoo. The 2-year old male and his sister Keysa are one of three feline species that have recently arrived at the park. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Pasha the white tiger pauses to enjoy a sip of water, before continuing to explore his new habitat at Singapore Zoo. The 2-year old male and his sister Keysa are one of three feline species that have recently arrived at the park. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The two-year-old brother and sister pair will take turns with Omar, the zoo’s 15-year-old white tiger, to prowl the tiger habitat at different times of the day. As Omar is in his senior years, there are plans to further enhance the collection in the event he passes on.

Singapore Zoo welcomed four sleek and stunning cheetahs from De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Centre in South Africa in January 2015. Two of the four peer curiously at their surroundings during their month-long quarantine. Visitors will soon get to see these charismatic cats at Singapore Zoo’s Wild Africa section. Cheetahs are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo welcomed four sleek and stunning cheetahs from De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Centre in South Africa in January 2015. Two of the four peer curiously at their surroundings during their month-long quarantine. Visitors will soon get to see these charismatic cats at Singapore Zoo’s Wild Africa section. Cheetahs are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Prepping themselves for their first appearance too, are two pairs of cheetahs. The two males Indiana and Obi, and two sisters Maya and Herculina, arrived from the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Centre on 14 January. The males will be introduced to the exhibit in early March, while the new females are being acquainted with Kima, the older cat in the Singapore Zoo collection. When they are eventually released into the habitat, visitors will likely only spot two or three cheetahs at any one time, as the sexes will be displayed separately in preparation for future breeding opportunities.

Visitors will have to wait a little longer for the mane event at the Zoo’s Wild Africa section. Timba, a two-year-old African male lion from Dierenpark Emmen in the Netherlands, is awaiting his harem of females, and will only be exhibited at a later date this year. The three females are scheduled to arrive in March.

Male African lion Timba may not be on display yet, but he is being kept occupied with operant conditioning sessions, including target training and whistle training, in the off-exhibit den. These sessions will make it easier for keepers and vets to conduct regular health checks in the future. African lions are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Male African lion Timba may not be on display yet, but he is being kept occupied with operant conditioning sessions, including target training and whistle training, in the off-exhibit den. These sessions will make it easier for keepers and vets to conduct regular health checks in the future. African lions are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

In the meantime, keepers have commenced the all-important medical training for Timba in the off-exhibit den. Aside from keeping him occupied and stimulated, the training is an important aspect of animal care in a modern zoo as it makes routine health checks less stressful for the animals, and is great for keeper-animal bonding.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “As part of our collection planning process, we routinely exchange captive-bred animals with other zoological institutions to ensure we have the appropriate numbers for exhibition and education purposes. New bloodlines are also essential to maintain genetic diversity which is all important for zoos to ensure sustainable captive populations.”

* IUCN stands for International Union for Conservation of Nature

JURONG BIRD PARK UNVEILS WINGS OF ASIA AVIARY

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Rejuvenated aviary houses one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of rare Asian birds;
Park welcomes 11 threatened species for conservation breeding

Guest-of-Honour Mr Desmond Lee, Minister of State for National Development, receives a key to Jurong Bird Park’s rejuvenated Wings of Asia aviary from Sassy the cockatoo.

Guest-of-Honour Mr Desmond Lee, Minister of State for National Development, receives a key to Jurong Bird Park’s rejuvenated Wings of Asia aviary from Sassy the cockatoo. (Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore)

SINGAPORE, 21 January 2015 – Visitors to Jurong Bird Park can marvel at some of Asia’s rarest and most exotic birds with the unveiling of the Wings of Asia aviary today, in a ceremony officiated by Mr Desmond Lee, Minister of State for National Development.

With a collection of over 500 birds representing 135 species when complete, the rejuvenated aviary houses the largest diversity of birds in the park. It is home to one of the world’s most comprehensive and admired collections of Asian birds, including 24 threatened species such as the Bali mynah, Luzon bleeding-heart dove and black-winged starling. These species have been successfully hatched and raised as part of the park’s ongoing conservation breeding programmes.

Black-winged starling

Eleven of the 24 threatened species are new additions, with five being displayed for the first time in the park. These include the Javan green magpie, rufous-fronted laughingthrush and racquet-tailed parrot which are expected to arrive in the park soon. Plans are underway to kick-start a breeding programme for these birds whose numbers are declining rapidly in the wild due to habitat loss and degradation as well as excessive trapping for the cage-bird trade. Through conservation breeding, the park hopes to maintain and safeguard a sustainable population of these birds and eventually introduce selected species back into the wild, in their native lands.

Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Over the years, Jurong Bird Park has been actively involved in the conservation of Asia’s most precious birds, from boosting the numbers of threatened species to working with multiple agencies, to repopulating birds in their native habitats. The unveiling of Wings of Asia represents another feather in our conservation cap and we hope this crown jewel will inspire visitors to appreciate, understand and protect Asia’s winged wonders.”

Previously known as the Southeast Asian Birds Aviary, the 2,600 square-meter exhibit underwent a three-month makeover which included the expansion of its smaller aviaries, theming work, refreshed educational displays for visitors to learn about the different species of birds, and an overhaul of its aviary mesh for better viewing.

Visitors can look forward to special experiences such as feeding and chit-chat sessions with keepers to learn more about the feathered residents.

BIRTH OF ENDANGERED ASIAN LION CUBS ROUND UP NIGHT SAFARI’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY WITH A ROAR

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Birth of two more cubs makes it a dozen babies in total for prolific Asian lion pair;

Only 300 Asian lions remain in India’s Gir Forest, the only place where they are found in the wild

Baring its full set of small but sharp teeth, this feisty little Asian lion cub is all set to roar into the new year, as part of the pride of 13 Asian lions that calls Night Safari home. The as-yet-unnamed cub is one of two Asian lion babies born on 27 September 2014. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Baring its full set of small but sharp teeth, this feisty little Asian lion cub is all set to roar into the new year, as part of the pride of 13 Asian lions that calls Night Safari home. The as-yet-unnamed cub is one of two Asian lion babies born on 27 September 2014. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Singapore, 9 December 2014 – As a sweet finale to Night Safari’s 20th anniversary this year, endangered Asian lion residents Khapat and Amba gifted the park with two Asian lion cubs, making them the 11th and 12th babies to be born to their prolific parents.

Born on 27 September, the tawny male and female pair was sexed, microchipped and given a round of vaccinations during their veterinary checkup in late November. Visitors can look out for them in upcoming months, when they will be introduced to their older siblings in the Asian lion exhibit along Night Safari’s tram route. For now, they are spending time bonding with mom in the cubbing den at a back of house facility.

One of the newest members of Night Safari’s Asian lion pride bares its teeth to demonstrate its mettle. The cub, one of two born on 27 September 2014, is currently bonding with mom in a back of house facility, but will be introduced to the Asian lion exhibit along Night Safari’s tram route in upcoming months. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

One of the newest members of Night Safari’s Asian lion pride bares its teeth to demonstrate its mettle. The cub, one of two born on 27 September 2014, is currently bonding with mom in a back of house facility, but will be introduced to the Asian lion exhibit along Night Safari’s tram route in upcoming months. Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “It’s always heartening to welcome new babies into our collection, especially at a time when many of the world’s wildlife species are being threatened as a direct result of human-related activities. These births are a valuable addition to an assurance colony of Asian lions under human care, and will help to safeguard against extinction in the wild.

Dr Ng Weng Yan, veterinarian, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, holds the male cub still to take its weight, as part of a health check. The cub weighed close to 8kg at two months, while his sister is a little lighter at approximately 6.8kg. Aside from being sexed for the first time, the cubs were also vaccinated and microchipped for identification.  Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Dr Ng Weng Yan, veterinarian, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, holds the male cub still to take its weight, as part of a health check. The cub weighed close to 8kg at two months, while his sister is a little lighter at approximately 6.8kg. Aside from being sexed for the first time, the cubs were also vaccinated and microchipped for identification.
Photo credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

The Asian lion is a separate subspecies from the African lion. Listed as endangered under the IUCN* Red List, it is smaller in size and sports a less significant mane compared to its African cousin. Most of the wild Asian lion population is found in India’s Gir Forest, a protected sanctuary where about 300 of these magnificent animals roam. Additionally, close to 340 Asian lions live in zoos. Night Safari has 13 lions in its pride, the fourth largest collection under human care.

Night Safari hopes that it will be able to contribute to Asian lion numbers, both wild and under human care, through its captive breeding programme. To date, Night Safari has successfully bred twelve Asian lion cubs, one of which was sent to Denmark’s Aalborg Zoo last June, as part of an animal exchange programme.

Award-winning Night Safari, the world’s first safari park for nocturnal animals, officially celebrated her 20th anniversary in May this year.

*IUCN: International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED BALI MYNAHS FIND NEW HOME IN JURONG BIRD PARK

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First feathered residents move into soon-to-be-opened Wings of Asia aviary

Avian management officer, Ivan Choo, releases a pair of Bali mynahs into Jurong Bird Park’s Wings of Asia aviary which will officially open in late January 2015.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Avian management officer, Ivan Choo, releases a pair of Bali mynahs into Jurong Bird Park’s Wings of Asia aviary which will officially open in late January 2015.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

SINGAPORE, 4 December 2014 – Four critically endangered Bali mynahs, whose numbers add up to fewer than 50 in the wild, were among the first feathered residents to move into the new Wings of Asia aviary at Jurong Bird Park.

The Bali mynah, or Bali starling, is found only in the Bali islands of Indonesia and can be identified through its clear white feathers, black-tipped wings and vivid blue skin around its eyes. The declining numbers are primarily attributable to unsustainable, illegal trapping for the pet trade and rapid habitat destruction.

With fewer than 50 left in the wild, the Bali mynah is one of the many rare bird species that Jurong Bird Park aims to protect through its conservation and research programmes. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

With fewer than 50 left in the wild, the Bali mynah is one of the many rare bird species that Jurong Bird Park aims to protect through its conservation and research programmes.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

To conserve the species, Jurong Bird Park has been working with the Bali-based Begawan Foundation on a breeding and exchange programme to boost the population and enhance the gene pool of Bali mynahs raised under human care.

In the next few weeks, over 300 feathered residents will be moved into their new homes. Visitors to Jurong Bird Park will soon get to marvel at Asia’s rarest and most exotic birds with the unveiling of the Wings of Asia aviary in late January 2015.

RHINOS IN TROUBLE: LEARN THE HORNEST TRUTH AT SINGAPORE ZOO’S RHINO CONSERVATION AWARENESS CAMPAIGN

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Singapore Zoo aims to raise awareness on the plight of rhinoceroses in the wild;
Campaign kick-starts with expert forum including speakers from TRAFFIC and WCS

Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s rhinoceros keepers join guests in clipping their fingernails to symbolise their commitment to rhino conservation ahead of the month-long Rhinos in Trouble awareness campaign at Singapore Zoo, which starts on 20 September 2014. Rhinos’ horns are made of keratin, the same material found in human hair and nails. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s rhinoceros keepers join guests in clipping their fingernails to symbolise their commitment to rhino conservation ahead of the month-long Rhinos in Trouble awareness campaign at Singapore Zoo, which starts on 20 September 2014. Rhinos’ horns are made of keratin, the same material found in human hair and nails. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.)

Singapore, 19 Sept 2014Singapore Zoo will launch a rhinoceros conservation awareness campaign, titled Rhinos in Trouble: The Hornest Truth, from 20 September to 20 October 2014 to raise awareness about the plight of rhinoceroses in the wild, and is working closely with TRAFFIC Southeast Asia and Wildlife Conservation Society (Vietnam) to stamp out illegal trade of rhino horns.

The month-long campaign is held in conjunction with World Rhino Day, which falls on 22 September. Visitors to Singapore Zoo are encouraged to donate their nail clippings to symbolise their commitment to rhino conservation.

International trade of rhinoceros horn has been illegal since the 80s, yet the market is still thriving today even though science has proven that rhino horn is only as useful as a medicine as human hair and nails are. Rhino horns are made of keratin, the same material found in human hair and nails.

Recent studies by TRAFFIC and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) have revealed that current consumption of products made from rhino horn has gone beyond perceived medicinal purposes. Rhino horn has become a luxury item and a status symbol. With the recent increase in wealthy individuals in Southeast Asia, rhino horn is also being used as a “hangover cure” after excessive alcohol consumption by the affluent.

The year 2013 set a record for rhino poaching in South Africa – home to around 75 per cent of the world’s total rhino population, with 1,004 killed. As of 10 September 2014, poachers had already butchered 769 rhinos in the country. If the current trend continues for the rest of 2014, the number of rhinos killed is likely to exceed record set in 2013 by another 100.

Even in Singapore, where the trade of endangered species and animal parts is strictly regulated, there had been cases where its ports were used as transit points. On 10 January 2014, eight pieces of rhinoceros horns weighing a total of about 21.5kg were confiscated at Changi Airport by the Singapore authorities.

With Rhinos in Trouble: The Hornest Truth, Singapore Zoo hopes to raise public awareness and engage Singaporeans to help in the efforts to save the rhinoceros in the wild.

Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “We urge the public to refuse any rhino horn or rhino horn products should they be offered any, and to please inform all their friends and relatives to do the same. If we don’t buy the product, demand will fall, and rhinoceroses will not suffer needless deaths. Together, we have to, and we can, ensure there is a future for these magnificent creatures.”

In a statement, Mr David Seow, Secretary General of the Singapore Chinese Druggists Association, appeals to Singaporeans to comply with the Government’s ban on the sale of any rhinoceros products and wishes to convey that there are many alternative medicinal material and products that can replace rhinoceros horns. Members of Singapore Chinese Druggists Association also fully support international conservation agreements and efforts to save the rhinoceros from extinction.

Pre-school guests at Singapore Zoo eager to show their support for rhinos lined up to drop their nail clippings into the Jar of Nails. The children, from Odyssey, the Global Pre-school, enjoyed a preview of the Rhinos in Trouble conservation awareness campaign which starts on 20 September 2014. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Pre-school guests at Singapore Zoo eager to show their support for rhinos lined up to drop their nail clippings into the Jar of Nails. The children, from Odyssey, the Global Pre-school, enjoyed a preview of the Rhinos in Trouble conservation awareness campaign which starts on 20 September 2014. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.)

Rhinos in Trouble: The Hornest Truth kick-starts with a public seminar on 20 Sept from 1pm – 5.30pm, and topics include:
– “Rhino Revolution from Africa to Asia” talk by Ms Jennifer Fox, Co-founder and partner, Thornybush Private Game Reserve, South Africa
– “Rhino Horn Trade in Vietnam” talk by Ms Duong Viet Hong, Communications Manager, Wildlife Conservation Society, Vietnam programme
– “Changing minds to save Rhinos: Demand reduction through behaviour change in Vietnam” talk by Dr Naomi Doak, Coordinator, TRAFFIC Southeast Asia, Greater Mekong Programme
The seminar also features a photography exhibition of the critically endangered Sumatran rhino, taken by wildlife photographer Mr Stephen Belcher. Proceeds from the sale of photographs will go towards wildlife conservation efforts.

LIST OF ACTIVITIES FOR RHINOS IN TROUBLE: THE HORNEST TRUTH

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For more information, visit http://www.zoo.com.sg/events-promos/rhino-month-14.html 
To make your stand against the rhino horn trade, go to www.zoo.com.sg/thehornesttruth

PANDA PARTY AT RIVER SAFARI

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Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for Kai Kai & Jia Jia at River Safari on Friday, 5 September 2014.

Kai Kai, who will turn seven on 14 September this year, enjoyed a colourful four-tiered birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, apples and carrots.  (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

Kai Kai, who will turn seven on 14 September this year, enjoyed a colourful four-tiered birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, apples and carrots. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

Female panda Jia Jia, turned six on 3 September. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

Female panda Jia Jia, turned six on 3 September.
(PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

The party included a giant mooncake in celebration of the Mid-Autumn Festival.

From left: Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Ms Jennie Chua, Director, CapitaLand Hope Foundation; Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Guest-of- Honour Miss Sim Ann, Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of Education; Mr S R Nathan, Sixth President of Singapore and Chairman, CapitaLand Hope Foundation; Mr Tan Seng Chai, Group Chief Corporate Officer, CapitaLand Limited; Mr Xiao Jianghua, Cultural Counsellor, Chinese Embassy. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

From left: Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Ms Jennie Chua, Director, CapitaLand Hope Foundation; Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Guest-of-
Honour Miss Sim Ann, Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of Education; Mr S R Nathan, Sixth President of Singapore and Chairman, CapitaLand Hope Foundation; Mr Tan Seng Chai, Group Chief Corporate Officer, CapitaLand Limited; Mr Xiao Jianghua, Cultural Counsellor, Chinese Embassy.
(PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

A new book for preschool children was also launched at the panda party. Titled 凯凯嘉嘉儿歌 (Kai Kai Jia Jia Nursery Rhymes), it tells the adventures of the two pandas in Singapore and aims at engaging pre-schoolers in learning Chinese through the panda ambassadors.

From left: Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Guest-of-Honour Miss Sim Ann, Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of Education. (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

From left: Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; Guest-of-Honour Miss Sim Ann, Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information & Ministry of Education.
(PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

More than 150 guests participated in a Panda Lantern Parade and shone lanterns of hope to light the way for the future of the endangered species.  (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

More than 150 guests participated in a Panda Lantern Parade and shone lanterns of hope to light the way for the future of the endangered species.
(PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

The birthday bash marks the start of week-long festivities at River Safari from 6 to 14 September to commemorate the pandas’ second year in Singapore and celebrate their birthdays.  (PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

The birthday bash marks the start of week-long festivities at River Safari from 6 to 14 September to commemorate the pandas’ second year in Singapore and celebrate their birthdays.
(PHOTO: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE)

Rise and Shine with Kai Kai & Jia Jia at Panda Party Week 2014

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River Safari launches new behind-the-scenes experience
with exclusive opportunity to visit giant pandas at their den

Participants preparing Kai Kai & Jia Jia’s bamboo breakfast in River Safari’s new Panda Rise and Shine programme which will be launched during Panda Party week. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Participants preparing Kai Kai & Jia Jia’s bamboo breakfast in River Safari’s new Panda Rise and Shine programme which will be launched during Panda Party week.
PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore, 27 August 2014 – Go behind-the-scenes with giant panda keepers for an exclusive opportunity to visit Kai Kai & Jia Jia at their dens with Panda Rise & Shine, a programme launched in celebration of River Safari’s Panda Party which commemorates the pandas’ birthdays and second year in Singapore.

During this learning journey, participants get to enter the park before it opens for some quality time with Kai Kai & Jia Jia. They will observe keepers serving the bears their pre-breakfast snack and the morning routine of physical checks, weighing and target training.

This premium programme is the first of its kind in River Safari that brings participants to the Giant Panda Forest back-of-house areas such as the pandas’ dens, kitchen and bamboo storage room. Participants of Panda Rise & Shine will assist keepers in preparing Kai Kai & Jia Jia’s bamboo breakfast and create enrichment toys for the furry duo. Through a personalised guided tour, participants will gain deeper insights into the bears, their diet and home in River Safari.

River Safari’s new Panda Rise and Shine programme, which will be launched during Panda Party week, provides participants with up-close encounters with Kai Kai & Jia Jia, including moments when they undergo target training with their keepers. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

River Safari’s new Panda Rise and Shine programme, which will be launched during Panda Party week, provides participants with up-close encounters with Kai Kai & Jia Jia, including moments when they undergo target training with their keepers.
PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Ms Lok May Kuen, Director, Education, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “As part of the upcoming Panda Party week that celebrates Kai Kai & Jia Jia’s birthdays and second anniversary in Singapore, we introduce Panda Rise & Shine, a new programme that offers an up-close encounter with the pandas. This programme allows participants to witness the special bond between keepers and pandas, as well as an opportunity to understand how we take care of this endangered species. We hope that participants will leave with a greater appreciation not just for giant pandas but all threatened wildlife. ”

The learning journey concludes with breakfast at Mama Panda Kitchen. In addition to an exclusive t-shirt and goodie bag, participants will get to bring home professionally taken photos to remember the special experience.

The Panda Rise & Shine programme is available at S$350, inclusive of River Safari admission*. This exclusive experience can accommodate a maximum of 6 people, and is suitable for participants aged 7 years and above. Participants below 13 years of age must be accompanied by a paying adult. More information can be found online at http://education.riversafari.com.sg/behindTheScenesTours.html.

The new behind-the-scenes experience is part of the activities visitors can look forward to at River Safari’s Panda Party, which aims to increase public awareness on the plight of giant pandas and the efforts to save them. Wildlife Reserves Singapore works closely with global experts in the area of conservation and research of giant pandas in China.

*Admission does not include boat rides in the park.

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