AH MENG AND FAMILY REVEL IN NEW HANGOUT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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New orangutan free-ranging area features scenic views of the Upper Seletar Reservoir;
visitors have one more week to enjoy Ah Meng-zing activities at world-class attraction

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Image 1: Sumatran orang utan Ah Meng (extreme right), Singapore Zoo’s animal icon, looks unfazed by heights as she chills out in her new free-ranging area, which overlooks the scenic Upper Seletar Reservoir. Orangutans are the award-winning zoo’s flagship species, and over 40 of them have been born here. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE, 21 June 2016Singapore Zoo introduced their flagship orangutans to a new free-ranging area earlier this month, to complement the Ah Meng-zing experience, which happens every weekend this June. Overlooking the picturesque Upper Seletar Reservoir, the new space features hammocks and interconnecting vines for the orangutans to explore. An average of five orangutans hang out in the area daily to enjoy the treetop haven, while guests walking underneath them stop to gaze in wonder at the charismatic apes above.

Guests have one final weekend to enjoy the Ah Meng-zing experience, where Singapore Zoo transforms into a living classroom to show visitors, parents and children alike, the small things they can do to help save the planet and the animals that share it. Visitors can discover and appreciate wildlife through a diverse range of activities, including meet and greet sessions with larger than life mascots, inventive craft workshops, and enlightening animal enrichment trails. For more information about the June holiday activities, visit http://www.zoo.com.sg/ahmeng-zing/

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Image 2: [FRONT ROW, FROM LEFT] Bornean orangutans Binti and her baby Adi, and Nattu, lounge with [BACK ROW, FROM LEFT] Sumatran orangutans Endah and Ah Meng on the hammock at Singapore Zoo’s new orangutan free-ranging area PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

POLAR BEAR INUKA MOVES INTO NEW FROZEN TUNDRA EXHIBIT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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First polar bear born in the tropics back with new neighbours, the raccoon dogs and wolverines.

Inuka, the first polar bear born in the tropics

Inuka, the first polar bear born in the tropics

Singapore, 29 May 2013 – The first polar bear born in the tropics, Singapore Zoo’s very own Inuka, moved into his new Frozen Tundra home today during a grand ‘housecooling’ party. The 2,700 sq metre exhibit features climate controlled resting areas, an expanded pool for Inuka to swim in, and two new sections for Inuka’s new neighbours: raccoon dogs and wolverines.

Modelled closely after the arctic habitat, some of the innovative features of Frozen Tundra that help replicate the chilly climate of the arctic include a new, larger pool filled with giant ice blocks so Inuka can enjoy refreshing swims, and an ice cave where he can retire to, to enjoy a polar siesta. Natural substrates have also been incorporated to provide him with a rich and varied home.

Frozen Tundra is the result of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS)’s commitment to upgrade Inuka’s living space and also reinforce WRS’ vision of providing visitors with interactive and enriching wildlife exhibits that provide for greater knowledge of the natural world, including of the climate, wildlife and issues facing the arctic habitat.

“At Singapore Zoo, we remain committed to not only providing a fun and beautiful park where families can bond over the wonders of mother nature, but also to our vision of engaging and educating our visitors about the natural world, the animals that share our planet and their habitats. This is a core value of Singapore Zoo,” said Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, WRS. “Those values and goals go hand in hand with our deep love of our animal friends here at Singapore Zoo, and Inuka is a shining example of that love.”

Dr Lee Boon Yang, Chairman of SPH and SPH Foundation, officiated the launch ceremony of Frozen Tundra with Mr Lee and WRS board member Mr Chia Ngiang Hong. SPH Foundation is a long-time adopter of Inuka.

The launch of Frozen Tundra also showcases Inuka’s new neighbours, the raccoon dogs and wolverines. Raccoon dogs, also known as tanuki, are native to East Asia. Frozen Tundra’s raccoon dogs are named Pom and Poko and come from Japan’s Asahiyama Zoo.

Wolverines are the largest land-dwelling species of the weasel family. Native across the Northern Hemisphere, wolverines have adapted to a wide range of habitats. Frozen Tundra’s wolverines are a brother and sister pair named Boris and Ivana from Russia’s Novosibirsk Zoo.

The idea of creating a new habitat for Inuka was conceptualised in 2006, and Frozen Tundra was designed to not only give Inuka a bigger space but more importantly, create a new exhibit that provides visitors a window into the arctic world from which Inuka’s ancestors came from. Native to the Arctic Circle, polar bears are the world’s largest land carnivore and adult males can weigh up to 700 kg.

Classified as vulnerable by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), the bear occupies a narrow ecological niche and preys almost exclusively on seals. Polar bears hunt mostly on ice floes in winter months, and retreating sea ice due to global warming has resulted in the diminishing of their hunting grounds and food sources. If global temperatures continue to rise, polar bears may become extinct across most of their range within a hundred years.

Frozen Tundra opens daily to the public from 29 May 2013. Visiting hours are from 8.30am to 6pm.

Dr Lee Boon Yang, Chairman of SPH and SPH Foundation, officiated the launch ceremony of Frozen Tundra with Mr Lee and WRS board member Mr Chia Ngiang Hong. SPH Foundation is a long-time adopter of Inuka.

Dr Lee Boon Yang, Chairman of SPH and SPH Foundation, officiated the launch ceremony of Frozen Tundra with Mr Lee and WRS board member Mr Chia Ngiang Hong. SPH Foundation is a long-time adopter of Inuka.

Frozen Tundra is the result of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS)’s commitment to upgrade Inuka’s living space and also reinforce WRS’ vision of providing visitors with interactive and enriching wildlife exhibits that provide for greater knowledge of the natural world, including of the climate, wildlife and issues facing the arctic habitat.

Frozen Tundra is the result of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS)’s commitment to upgrade Inuka’s living space and also reinforce WRS’ vision of providing visitors with interactive and enriching wildlife exhibits that provide for greater knowledge of the natural world, including of the climate, wildlife and issues facing the arctic habitat.

The first polar bear born in the tropics, Singapore Zoo’s very own Inuka, moved into his new Frozen Tundra home during a grand ‘housecooling’ party on 29 May 2013. Frozen Tundra was designed to not only give Inuka a bigger space but more importantly, create a new exhibit that provides visitors a window into the arctic world

The first polar bear born in the tropics, Singapore Zoo’s very own Inuka, moved into his new Frozen Tundra home during a grand ‘housecooling’ party on 29 May 2013. Frozen Tundra was designed to not only give Inuka a bigger space but more importantly, create a new exhibit that provides visitors a window into the arctic world

Modelled closely after the arctic habitat, some of the innovative features of Frozen Tundra that help replicate the chilly climate of the arctic include a new, larger pool filled with giant ice blocks so Inuka can enjoy refreshing swims, and an ice cave where he can retire to, to enjoy a polar siesta.

Modelled closely after the arctic habitat, some of the innovative features of Frozen Tundra that help replicate the chilly climate of the arctic include a new, larger pool filled with giant ice blocks so Inuka can enjoy refreshing swims, and an ice cave where he can retire to, to enjoy a polar siesta.

OUR PLAYFUL PRIMATES ARE HAVING AN AFFAIR THIS SCHOOL HOLIDAYS

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SINGAPORE ZOO CELEBRATES MAN’S CLOSEST COUSINS WITH ACTIVITIES SHOWCASING OUR COLLECTION OF 39 PRIMATES, ALMOST HALF OF WHICH ARE ENDANGERED.

FROM LEFT: Pic 1: Meet Sumatran Supermom Chomel with her babies during a Primate Affair at Singapore Zoo. Pic 2: Watch the cheeky brown capuchins battle with macadamia nuts during Primate Kingdom Adventure! Pic 3: Call of the Gibbon Trail will allow you to listen to the mesmerising calls of our white handed gibbons

FROM LEFT:
Pic 1: Meet Sumatran Supermom Chomel with her babies during a Primate Affair at Singapore Zoo.
Pic 2: Watch the cheeky brown capuchins battle with macadamia nuts during Primate Kingdom Adventure! Pic 3: Call of the Gibbon Trail will allow you to listen to the mesmerising calls of our white handed gibbons

10 May 2012 – Go bananas at Singapore Zoo’s aptly named Primate Affair this May and June. More than just monkey business, it’ll also have our apes and prosimians elbowing their way into the spotlight at the biggest party to hit this side of Singapore.

Known for their intelligence and dexterity, primates have always fascinated man due to the many similarities we share. Watch as they exhibit some of their skills through various trails and enrichment activities, or get starstruck at our meet and greet session with what we consider royalty at Singapore Zoo. Tumble headlong into the fun and learn about the differences among the various primates along the way! Especially for kids, don’t forget to pick up your binocular freebie on the way in to complete your primate adventure (while stocks last).

Details:
Date: 26, 27 May, 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17 June
Venue: Singapore Zoo (various locations), 80 Mandai Lake Road, Singapore 729826
Time: Activity times are detailed below
Fee: Activities are free
Note: Normal admission rates of $20.00 for adults and $13.00 for children between 3-12 years apply

Activities:

Primate Enrichment Trails and Token Feeding sessions
Like humans, our primate friends need constant stimulation to keep boredom at bay. These innovative enrichment trails were invented by our creative zoology team to keep the creatures’ minds and fingers busy. Visitors will surely be enthralled by the varied skills and amusing behaviour of these amazing animals.

1. Treetops Trail Treats
Start at the cotton top tamarins at the Rainforest Courtyard (just after the entrance) and then venture deeper into the trail to visit our unique saki monkeys. Watch as our frisky critters figure out how to get to their delicious treats.

Venue: Rainforest Courtyard/Treetops Trail
Time: 10:15am (30 min)

2. Orang Utan Playtime
Singapore Zoo’s flagship species are always enthralling to watch. Spend some time discovering the man of the forest as our keepers share some insights into working with these magnificent creatures. Then, continue to be mesmerised by these gorgeous apes as they have a giggle with gunny sacks.

Venue: Bornean Orang Utan Island and Free-ranging Areas
Time: 11:00am (20 min)

3. Call Of The Gibbon Trail
The primates along Gibbon Island are vocalists extraordinaires! Come listen to their cacophony of cries, in response to pre-recorded calls. There are the black howler monkeys, with their deep throaty cries, gibbons with their territorial whoops and red-ruffed lemurs with their signature ‘barks’!

Venue: Gibbon Island
Time: 1:40pm (20 min)

4. Primate Kingdom Adventure
Want to watch the baboons get ‘tyred’ out? Their enrichment tyre, filled with nuts, sunflower seeds and other treats will get them all hyped up so stay for the action as they passionately pry the goodies out. Our capuchin monkeys get to battle with macadamia nuts instead. Also not to be missed are the Sulawesi crested macaques, spider monkeys and all the other residents at Primate Kingdom!

Venue: Primate Kingdom and Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia
Time: 2:00pm (Primate Kingdom) (30 min), 2:30pm (Hamadryas baboon) (20 min)

5. Fragile Forest Fun and Friends
Meet the lemurs, mandrills and chimpanzees in this trail as they curiously unravel the enrichment surprises thought up by their keepers!

Venue: Fragile Forest, chimpanzee and mandrill exhibit
Time: Starts at Fragile Forest at 4:15pm and ends at chimpanzee at 4.45pm (30 min)

Sumatran Supermom – Meet Chomel and her babies
Proud Sumatran orang utan mother Chomel is following in her famed grandmother Ah Meng’s footsteps, by caring for a baby that is not her own.

Although a first time mother, Chomel has always shown nurturing qualities. In her younger days, she would often be seen helping the younger orang utans navigate the free-ranging areas with ease, teaching them how to test their weight on the branches before moving ahead. When Chomel’s aunt, Sayang, fell gravely ill, she rose to the occasion, taking little cousin Ishta under her nurturing wing, despite already having a baby of her own to care for!

Come say hello to Chomel and her babies, Bino and Ishta, and witness history repeating itself. Ah Meng would’ve been proud!

Venue: Free-ranging Orang Utan (Island)
Time: 1.30pm (10 min)