WOW WILD LEARN PROGRAMME TO PROMOTE USE OF CHINESE LANGUAGE

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A collaboration between the Committee to Promote Chinese Language Learning
and Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Left: Teaching and learning the Chinese Language is set to become more fun and interactive for pre-school teachers and students with the Wow Wild Learning programme, which consists of a series of workshops, activities, and supplementary readings revolving around a learning journey at River Safari. PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Right: Under the Wow Wild Learn programme, Wildlife Reserves Singapore will equip pre-school teachers with nuggets of wildlife information and teaching resources, like a panda storybook, to turn the River Safari into a living classroom for their students. PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

SINGAPORE, 16 February 2016 – Teaching and learning the Chinese Language is set to become even more fun and interactive for pre-school teachers and their students with the Wow Wild Learn programme (娃娃游园乐), which consists of a series of workshops, activities, and supplementary readings revolving around a learning journey at River Safari. The pilot initiative is a collaboration between the Committee to Promote Chinese Language Learning (CPCLL) and Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Ms May Lok, Director of Education, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Education for young children has always been, and will always be, a key pillar for parks managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore. River Safari is no exception. With the pilot Wow Wild Learn programme, we aim to bring the Chinese Language to life in our wildlife environment, and make learning enjoyable for both pre-school teachers and their students.”

Mr Ang Hin Kee, Leader of the Pre-School Working Group, CPCLL, said, “We hope to equip pre-school Chinese Language teachers with more knowledge and material to conduct the learning of Chinese Language in an engaging manner. Parents also play an important role and we want to provide opportunities for them to interact and learn Mandarin together with their children.”

Under the Wow Wild Learn programme, Wildlife Reserves Singapore will offer a half-day training workshop for pre-school teachers to equip them with the necessary knowledge and nuggets of wildlife information to turn River Safari into a living classroom for their students. In addition, the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Education team has also developed activity sheets and two pictorial books as resources for the teachers. Pre-school centres that are successful in their application for the programme will receive subsidized funding from the CPCLL, capped at $700 per centre.

Upon completion of the workshop, pre-school teachers can register their students for the “River Safari Flows to School: I’m a Panda Keeper” outreach programme, where the children’s close encounters with River Safari’s lovable pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia will give them an interactive experience in learning both the Chinese Language and the importance of protecting wildlife.

To promote parent-child bonding, teachers will encourage parents to plan activities that facilitate interaction with their pre-school children in Mandarin. Each student will also receive a set of books on the pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia.

The Wow Wild Learn programme will be held from 1 April to 31 October 2016. Registration is open to all pre-schools registered under the Early Childhood Development Agency. Invitation has been sent by the CPCLL to eligible pre-school centres, and there has been overwhelming response.

BIRTHDAY SUSPENSE FOR GIANT PANDAS AT RIVER SAFARI

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Giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia celebrate birthdays and third anniversary in Singapore; Changes in Jia Jia’s hormones and behaviours keep caretakers on toes over possible pregnancy

Female panda Jia Jia, who was late for her birthday party, turns seven today. She enjoyed a colourful birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, apples and carrots at River Safari’s Panda Party. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Female panda Jia Jia, who was late for her birthday party, turns seven today. She enjoyed a colourful birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, apples and carrots at River Safari’s Panda Party. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

SINGAPORE, 3 September 2015 – As she quietly celebrated her 7th birthday this morning, River Safari’s female panda Jia Jia continues to keep a little secret which has been keeping vets and keepers on their toes over changes in her behaviours.

In the past two months, panda caretakers have been playing a guessing game on whether the bear is pregnant or going through pseudopregnancy, a common state in which pandas exhibit hormonal and behavioural changes that indicate they are pregnant when they are not.

After the panda underwent artificial insemination on 18 April, caretakers, including a panda specialist from China, have been closely monitoring her behaviours and hormone levels, watching for signs of pregnancy. Since July, Jia Jia has been eating less bamboo, sleeping more, spending more time in her den and her hormone levels are increasing – all signs consistent with pregnancy or pseudopregnancy. Giant pandas commonly display pseudopregnancies and experts worldwide are often not able to determine pandas’ pregnancy status until a late stage.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Under the watchful eyes of our vets and keepers, both Kai Kai and Jia Jia continue to develop well in their Singapore home. Both reached sexual maturity for the first time this year and we are now tracking Jia Jia closely. We hope the data and knowledge gathered from the study of Kai Kai and Jia Jia will add to the global understanding of this endangered species, and contribute to the conservation of giant pandas.”

Vets and keepers have been conducting weekly ultrasound scans to detect a foetus but the results have been inconclusive. Panda caretakers could not detect any foetus based on a recent ultrasound scan on 31 August. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Vets and keepers have been conducting weekly ultrasound scans to detect a foetus but the results have been inconclusive. Panda caretakers could not detect any foetus based on a recent ultrasound scan on 31 August.
PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Since 23 July, vets and keepers have been conducting weekly ultrasound scans in an attempt to detect a foetus but the results have been inconclusive. The gestation period for a giant panda is typically five months, and the foetus only starts to develop a few weeks before birth.

Dr Serena Oh, Assistant Director of Veterinary Services, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Her behaviours are in line with a rise in progesterone but it is not easy to confirm her pregnancy because the gestation period varies for each panda. Giant pandas have delayed implantation and it is difficult to see the small foetus during ultrasound scans. We can only definitively conclude she is not pregnant once her hormone levels return to normal and she has not delivered, but for now, it is still a guessing game.”

Classified as “endangered” with only 1,600 left in the wild, giant pandas are notoriously difficult to breed. River Safari’s pandas were brought together to mate in April, after vets and keepers had successfully triggered breeding behaviours through controlled lighting and temperature in Giant Panda Forest. As the mating session appeared unsuccessful, Jia Jia was artificially inseminated.

Vets and keepers will continue monitoring Jia Jia’s hormone levels and conduct ultrasound scans. The public can follow Jia Jia’s development via Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s Twitter account (@tweetWRS) with the hashtag #SGPanda.

Jia Jia’s mate, Kai Kai, was also presented with a cake today where he enjoyed the birthday treat in the company of 30 pre-school kids from PCF Zhenghua. The male panda will turn eight on 14 September.

The pandas’ birthdays will be marked with a Panda Party Week from 5 to 13 September, where both bears will receive daily treats as a form of enrichment. In addition, visitors can look forward to interactive booths to learn more about giant pandas, and get hands-on with arts and crafts. Visitors can also enjoy one-for-one promotions on exclusive panda merchandise, as well as panda-licious treats. To mark the pandas’ coming of age, children born in 2007 and 2008 enter River Safari for free in September. Free admission is extended to Singaporeans, permanent residents and long-term visit pass holders.

KEEPERS AND VETS PUT PANDAS IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE AT RIVER SAFARI

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Giant pandas Kai Kai & Jia Jia enter mating season for the first time; Panda caretakers successfully trigger breeding behaviours through controlled lighting and temperature in Giant Panda Forest

Giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia displayed breeding behaviours for the first time at River Safari and were brought together to mate in their den on Friday, 17 April. The 40-minute session did not appear to be successful, which is typical for first-time breeders as they may not know how to mate. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Giant pandas Kai Kai & Jia Jia displayed breeding behaviours for the first time at River Safari and were brought together to mate in their den on Friday, 17 April. The 40-minute session did not appear to be successful, which is typical for first-time breeders as they may not know how to mate. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

SINGAPORE, 21 April 2015 Giant pandas Kai Kai & Jia Jia have officially crossed their first mating season, a cause for jubilation for caretakers at River Safari as the endangered bears are notoriously difficult to breed.

Kai Kai & Jia Jia’s development has been an interesting case for researchers as they are the first pair of giant pandas living so close to the equator. The pubescent pandas were suitable for pairing last year but did not show signs of readiness to mate. Pandas’ mating instincts are brought on by hormonal changes in response to seasonal variations, such as temperature changes and increasing day length from winter to spring.

River Safari’s keepers and vets have employed a number of measures since last November to trigger the breeding cycles of the pandas. These included varying the daylight hours and temperature in the panda exhibit to simulate the transition from winter to spring in the pandas’ homeland in Sichuan, China.

Pubescent panda Kai Kai started showing increasing levels of interest in Jia Jia following efforts by keepers and vets in altering exhibit conditions to trigger breeding behaviours. In early April, the giant pandas were frequently seen peering through the gap in the closed gate linking their exhibits, scent-marking their areas and bleating at each other. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The pandas responded. Seven-year-old Kai Kai started bleating and scent-marking more frequently to attract six-year-old Jia Jia, who showed the first sign of coming into estrous on 5 April, marked by her swollen genital, restless behaviour and hormonal analysis that indicated she was in heat. The two bears were also frequently seen calling out to each other and looking through a closed gate linking their exhibit.

River Safari’s keepers and vets have employed a number of measures since November 2014 to trigger the breeding cycles of the pandas, and the bears responded well. Since 5 April, six-year-old female Jia Jia started showing signs that she was in heat. She was restless, pacing in the exhibit, rolling on the ground and attempting to breach the gate connecting hers and Kai Kai’s exhibit. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

River Safari’s keepers and vets have employed a number of measures since November 2014 to trigger the breeding cycles of the pandas, and the bears responded well. Since 5 April, six-year-old female Jia Jia started showing signs that she was in heat. She was restless, pacing in the exhibit, rolling on the ground and attempting to breach the gate connecting hers and Kai Kai’s exhibit. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “The latest development with Kai Kai & Jia Jia spells exciting times for panda researchers. They are the first pair of giant pandas to live so close to the equator, and we have shown that we can provide the right conditions to elicit mating behaviours. Maintaining a sustainable population of these critically endangered animals under human care is a crucial part of their conservation plan.”

On the evening of 17 April, both pandas were brought together for the first time in their dens for natural mating. The 40-minute session did not appear to be successful, which is typical for first-time breeders as they may not know how to mate. A decision was made to carry out artificial insemination to increase Jia Jia’s chances of conceiving.

As it became evident that the giant pandas were ready for pairing, on 17 April, keepers brought Kai Kai and Jia Jia together for the first time in an attempt at natural mating. Kai Kai curiously sniffed Jia Jia during their first introduction without barriers. Previously, both pandas have never been in close physical contact with each other. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

As it became evident that the giant pandas were ready for pairing, on 17 April, keepers brought Kai Kai and Jia Jia together for the first time in an attempt at natural mating. Kai Kai curiously sniffed Jia Jia during their first introduction without barriers. Previously, both pandas have never been in close physical contact with each other. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Dr Serena Oh, Assistant Director of Veterinary Services, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Panda reproduction is a notoriously complex process, with females ovulating once a year, in which they are fertile for only 24 to 36 hours. Jia Jia’s hormones started falling on Friday and we needed to move quickly to artificial insemination due to the short window when female pandas are able to conceive.”

On 18 April, male panda Kai Kai was brought into the Wildlife Healthcare and Research Centre for a health check, followed by electroejaculation which is a technique commonly used for semen collection. To ensure a higher chance of conception, the dedicated team of veterinarians and giant panda keepers carried out artificial insemination after an unsuccessful mating session. From left to right (foreground): Head Veterinarian Dr Serena Oh, male panda Kai Kai, Senior Veterinarian Dr Abraham Matthews and Veterinarian Dr Anwar Ali. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

On 18 April, male panda Kai Kai was brought into the Wildlife Healthcare and Research Centre for a health check, followed by electroejaculation which is a technique commonly used for semen collection. To ensure a higher chance of conception, the dedicated team of veterinarians and giant panda keepers carried out artificial insemination after an unsuccessful mating session.
From left to right (foreground): Head Veterinarian Dr Serena Oh, male panda Kai Kai, Senior Veterinarian Dr Abraham Matthews and Veterinarian Dr Anwar Ali. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

She continued: “In the next few months, we will continue to monitor Jia Jia’s hormone levels and conduct ultrasounds to determine if she is pregnant. We will wait and hope for the best.”

In an attempt to increase her chances for a baby panda, Jia Jia was brought into the Wildlife Healthcare and Research Centre for artificial insemination. The vets will monitor Jia Jia for signs of pregnancy in the next few months. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

In an attempt to increase her chances for a baby panda, Jia Jia was brought into the Wildlife Healthcare and Research Centre for artificial insemination. The vets will monitor Jia Jia for signs of pregnancy in the next few months. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The gestation period for a panda is typically five months, and one or two cubs are usually born.

GET DRESSED FOR TRICK-OR-TREAT FUN AT RIVER SAFARI’S FIRST SAFARI BOO

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Kids enjoy merry-not-scary festivities for free at River Safari from 6pm

Safari Boo visual

SINGAPORE, 1 October 2014 – This October, River Safari invites all little ones to join Singapore’s wildest trick-or-treat event – Safari Boo – for free! Dress the kids in their favourite costumes for an enchanting night with mythical creatures, interactive discovery stations, special animal presentations, and up-close encounters with river monsters at twilight.

Held over five days on Oct 22, 25, 26 & Nov 1 and 2, Safari Boo festivities take place from 6pm to 9pm (last admission at 8pm). The park will be transformed with colourful decoration, trick-or-treat trails, illuminated displays and a parade of fantastical characters such as the mermaid and unicorn. Children aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm* and are encouraged to come dressed in fun (not scary) costumes and stand a chance to win in a costume contest. To get into the festive spirit, even Kai Kai & Jia Jia mascots will be decked out in their Safari Boo outfit.

Mr Lee Meng Tat, Chief Executive Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Safari Boo is an all-new event for families with children to have a fun and educational time at River Safari. Through the exciting programme line-up and hands-on activities, we hope visitors will have a memorable adventure in the park and learn a thing or two about wildlife.”

As part of the festivities at Safari Boo, the Giant Panda Courtyard will be home to a myriad of activity stations, including one where little ones can play archaeologist and uncover animal bones to solve mysteries. Those brave for some scaly encounters can feel the unique body covering of animals such as the pangolin and arapaima, and find out why these animals are threatened because of their scales.

Meet a friendly witch and Frankenstein himself, who will introduce various creatures of the night and charm visitors with stories in River Talk: Myths and Legends. This special animal presentation features up-close encounters with snakes, bearded dragons and creepy-crawlies, and is a purr-fect opportunity for kids (and even adults) to get over their phobias and educate others against developing fears of these misunderstood creatures.

Those bone on the wild side will love the after-dark experience at River Safari where they will get to observe the behaviours of river monsters such as the powerful arapaima and colossal giant freshwater stingray. Visitors can also find out more about creatures with blood-thirsty reputation such as the leech and tick, and even get a chance to feel the fangs of the vampire bat!

Safari Boo features daytime festivities where animals will indulge in special pumpkins filled with their favourite treats! Catch the cute antics of giant pandas, red pandas and squirrel monkeys as they chomp, dig and crunch their way through the festive treats as a form of enrichment. Visitors can also embark on a guided trail to learn freaky facts about the river monsters that roam in the park.

Squirrel monkeys indulging in pumpkin treats as part of Safari Boo

Safari Boo event tickets (6pm to 9pm) are priced at $15 for adults. Last admission is at 8pm. Children aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm*. Visitors with River Safari admission tickets can take part in Safari Boo activities for free.

For more information, refer to the Appendix below or visit www.riversafari.com.sg/safariboo

*Terms and conditions apply.

Appendix

1. ADMISSION

Safari Boo activity days:

  • 22 Oct (Wed, Deepavali)
  • 25 Oct (Sat)
  • 26 Oct (Sun)
  • 1 Nov (Sat)
  • 2 Nov 2014 (Sun)

admission

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

  • Activities are weather-permitting.
  • Safari Boo festivities take place from 6pm to 9pm. Last admission is at 8pm.
  • The Giant Panda Forest, Squirrel Monkey Forest and boat rides will be closed as per normal opening times at River Safari and will not be opened for Safari Boo.
  • River Safari and Park Hopper (with River Safari option) admission ticket holders can take part in Safari Boo activities for free.
  • Safari Boo ticket holders can only enter the park from 6pm.
  • River Safari & Park Hopper admission tickets and Safari Boo event tickets can be purchased at Singapore Zoo ticketing counters or at www.riversafari.com.sg/safariboo.
  • Sale of Safari Boo tickets at Singapore Zoo ticketing counters starts at 5pm.
  • Adult supervision is required for all kids participating in Safari Boo. Child is defined as individuals aged 12 years and below.
  • Complimentary tickets for kids to enter for free from 6pm can be collected by accompanying adults at Singapore Zoo ticketing counters from 5pm.
  • For online purchases, all complimentary child ticket redemptions must be accompanied by at least one paid adult event ticket per transaction.

2. ACTIVITIES AT A GLANCE

activities

RIVER SAFARI LAUNCHES INAUGURAL BEHIND-THE-SCENES TOURS FOR VISITORS

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– Two exclusive programmes launched in June to take visitors on learning journeys.

Singapore, 14 May 2014 – For the first time, visitors can have a glimpse of the inner workings of River Safari with the launch of two new behind-the-scenes programmes. Titled Fishy Business and Be a Panda Researcher, these programmes are packed with hands-on experiences that present a unique perspective on Asia’s first and only river-themed wildlife park and its animal residents.

Participants exploring behind-the-scenes for a first-hand look at the life support system of the world’s largest freshwater aquarium at River Safari. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Participants exploring behind-the-scenes for a first-hand look at the life support system of the world’s largest freshwater aquarium at River Safari. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Panda fans can learn more about the park’s famous residents, giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia, as well as their wild cousins in Be a Panda Researcher. Through a series of investigative tasks at various activity stations, participants will get down and dirty to ‘dissect’ panda poo and appreciate the hard work that goes into meeting Kai Kai and Jia Jia’s special dietary needs. By examining paw prints and other markings, they will also gain insights into how researchers track pandas in the wild and implement conservation measures to save these endangered bears from extinction.

Participants preparing food for the park’s aquatic residents as part of the Fishy Business programme, one of the two inaugural behind-the-scenes tours launched at River Safari. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Participants preparing food for the park’s aquatic residents as part of the Fishy Business programme, one of the two inaugural behind-the-scenes tours launched at River Safari. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Those game for some Fishy Business can venture deep into the underbelly of the Amazon Flooded Forest exhibit and discover what the aquarists do to keep the animal residents in the pink of health. Participants will explore the massive life support system of the world’s largest freshwater aquarium, conduct water tests and prepare food and enrichment for river giants such as the manatees and arapaimas. The finale to the programme is a visual spectacle of the silver arowana, also known as the water monkey, leaping out of the water to strike at its prey during special feeding sessions.

Ms May Lok, Director, Education, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Many a times visitors are curious about our work, and our team is also eager to share the passion and joy in the day-to-day care for our 6000 animals. Be a Panda Researcher and Fishy Business are the first behind-the-scenes tours in River Safari we have curated for the public. We hope visitors who participate in these programmes will walk away with a deeper understanding on the park and its animal residents, and a greater appreciation of freshwater ecosystems.”

Be a Panda Researcher and Fishy Business programmes are each available at S$39 for adults and S$29 for children, inclusive of River Safari admission*. Be a Panda Researcher can accommodate a maximum of 60 people while Fishy Business can accommodate a maximum of 30. Both tours are recommended for children 9 years and above. Reservations can be made online at http://education.riversafari.com.sg/whatshap.html. The two programmes are launched in commemoration of 50 years of tourism development and promotions in Singapore.

*Admission does not include Amazon River Quest boat ride.

KAI KAI AND JIA JIA IN SINGAPORE, ONE YEAR ON

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– Wildlife Reserves Singapore and CapitaLand celebrate giant pandas’ birthdays and first anniversary in Singapore; Visitors to enjoy slew of pandastic activities from 7 to 15 September.

Singapore, 6 September 2013
Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for Kai Kai and Jia Jia today, with a specially-made cake and toy for the birthday duo. The birthday bash marks the start of week-long festivities at River Safari from 7 to 15 September to commemorate the pandas’ one-year anniversary in Singapore and celebrate Jia Jia turning five on 3 September and Kai Kai turning six on 14 September.

Male panda Kai Kai received a three-tiered birthday cake made of ice, bamboo and his favourite treats, while his female counterpart, Jia Jia, received a chime toy made of bamboo stems. The birthday presents were specially created and presented by 10 Panda Party Planners – lucky members of the public, including five readers of the CapitaLand Inside Different Geographies e-publication, who went behind-the-scenes with panda keepers to prepare these treats for the pandas to keep them mentally and physically stimulated.

Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “The past year has been an exciting one as we discover more about the personalities of our pandas. Kai Kai and Jia Jia are ambassadors for their own kind, and we hope that visitors who meet them will learn more about these endangered bears and be inspired to protect these magnificent creatures.”

Almost 600,000 panda lovers have visited Kai Kai and Jia Jia since the Giant Panda Forest opened to the public last year. Kai Kai, who is usually laid-back, has recently been spotted climbing up a tree at 5pm every day to look out for his keepers, and preparing to retreat to his den for evening treats. He is curious when keepers implement enrichment activities such as introducing new scents, or wrapping treats with leaves for him to find.

Jia Jia, on the other hand, is the shyer of the two. A closed-circuit television was installed in February so that visitors can see Jia Jia during moments when she chooses to stay in her den. In recent months, Jia Jia started showing her playful side and can be seen tumbling down slopes and knocking down nearly 10 trees, which horticulturists have had to replant.

Mr S R Nathan, Chairman, CapitaLand Hope Foundation, CapitaLand’s philanthropic arm, said: “We are pleased to see that Kai Kai and Jia Jia have settled in well in their Singapore home since they arrived a year ago. In the past year, Kai Kai and Jia Jia have brought Singapore much joy with their adorable antics and heightened awareness towards wildlife conservation. As we commemorate Kai Kai and Jia Jia’s first year in Singapore and celebrate their birthdays today, we hope to continue our emphasis on educating younger Singaporeans on caring for the eco-system.”

Mr Lim Ming Yan, President & Group CEO of CapitaLand Limited, said: “Today’s celebration marks Kai Kai and Jia Jia’s birthdays as well as an important milestone for their 10-year stay in Singapore. We are happy to partner WRS in celebrating this delightful occasion as the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme. To further CapitaLand’s commitment towards wildlife conservation education, we have also actively engaged our stakeholders including readers of our CapitaLand Inside Different Geographies e-publication in the search for Panda Party Planners and our shoppers during the ‘Pandamonium at CapitaMalls’ roadshows in Singapore held last month.”

Inside the Giant Panda Forest, a few home improvements have been added to ensure the pandas’ comfort. Among the new features are:
– Additional branches for Kai Kai and Jia Jia to climb
– Wooden platforms raised above ground level for the pandas to sit and rest on
– Caves in Jia Jia’s exhibit for the shy bear to hide in

Visitors can enjoy the celebratory activities at River Safari during the panda party week from 7 to 15 September. These include free guided tours at the Giant Panda Forest as well as panda awareness booths where you can feel the teeth of a giant panda or get a whiff of panda poop! Face painters will be around to turn you into a panda before meeting the birthday duo, and party animals can go on a frenzy at our panda-themed photo booth!

For more information, visit http://www.riversafari.com.sg

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia at River Safari today. Kai Kai, who will turn six on 14 September this year, enjoyed a three-tiered birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, flowers and his favourite treats.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia at River Safari today. Kai Kai, who will turn six on 14 September this year, enjoyed a three-tiered birthday cake made of ice, bamboo, flowers and his favourite treats.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia at River Safari today. Jia Jia received a chime toy made of bamboo stems.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia at River Safari today. Jia Jia received a chime toy made of bamboo stems.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia at River Safari today. The birthday bash marks the start of week-long festivities at River Safari from 7 to 15 September to commemorate the pandas’ one-year anniversary in Singapore and celebrate the birthdays of Jia Jia who turned five on 3 September and Kai Kai turning six on 14 September this year. From left: Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; His Excellency Mr Duan Jielong, Ambassador, Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the Republic of Singapore; Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, Mr S R Nathan, Sixth President of Singapore; and Chairman, CapitaLand Hope Foundation; Mr Lim Ming Yan, President and Group CEO CapitaLand Limited, Ms Jennie Chua, Director, CapitaLand Hope Foundation.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party for giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia at River Safari today. The birthday bash marks the start of week-long festivities at River Safari from 7 to 15 September to commemorate the pandas’ one-year anniversary in Singapore and celebrate the birthdays of Jia Jia who turned five on 3 September and Kai Kai turning six on 14 September this year.
From left: Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore; His Excellency Mr Duan Jielong, Ambassador, Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the Republic of Singapore; Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, Mr S R Nathan, Sixth President of Singapore; and Chairman, CapitaLand Hope Foundation; Mr Lim Ming Yan, President and Group CEO CapitaLand Limited, Ms Jennie Chua, Director, CapitaLand Hope Foundation.

Visitors watched in anticipation as female panda, Jia Jia, who recently turned five, made her way towards her birthday treat.

Visitors watched in anticipation as female panda, Jia Jia, who recently turned five, made her way towards her birthday treat.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party today, kicking off the programme with a lively panda-themed dance item.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) and CapitaLand Limited (CapitaLand), the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the Giant Panda Collaborative Programme, threw a big panda party today, kicking off the programme with a lively panda-themed dance item.

MEET “KAI KAI” (凯凯) AND “JIA JIA” (嘉嘉) – SINGAPORE’S GIANT PANDAS

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WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE ANNOUNCES NAMES CHOSEN FROM NATIONWIDE SEARCH

Singapore, 16 March 2011 – After a six-month-long nationwide contest, the names of Singapore’s two most highly anticipated soon-to-be ‘permanent residents’ have been selected from nearly 1,000 entries submitted by the public last year. A distinguished judging panel has picked “Kai Kai” (凯凯) and “Jia Jia” (嘉嘉) as the new names for the two Giant Panda cubs as they bear special significance of the close relationship between Singapore and China. The names “Kai Kai” (凯凯) and “Jia Jia” (嘉嘉) won by a clear majority of the judges’ votes.

The seven-person judging panel consisted of representatives from different agencies and organisations, namely Mr Chen Jiang, Cultural Counsellor, Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in Singapore; Professor Tommy Koh, Ambassador-at-Large, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Ms Aw Kah Peng, Chief Executive, Singapore Tourism Board; Professor Wang Gungwu, Chairman, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore; Mr Liew Mun Leong, President and CEO, CapitaLand Group; Ms Jennie Chua, Chief Corporate Officer, CapitaLand Limited; and Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

“Kai Kai”, the name for the male giant panda, was chosen as it means ‘victorious’ in Chinese (as in 凯旋, 凯歌) and is a testament to the 20 triumphant years of Sino-Singapore relations. For the female giant panda, ‘Jia Jia’ which means beautiful and fine, is a reflection of the excellent ties between Singapore and China. On another level, the Chinese character ‘Jia’ (嘉) was used in the old Chinese reference for Singapore (星嘉坡) and the phonetic pronunciation of ‘Jia’ is equivalent to the Mandarin pronunciation of the Chinese character ‘加’, which is not only an integral part of Singapore’s current Chinese name (新加坡), but also means ‘to add’ – representing the wish to expand the giant panda family in Singapore through a successful breeding programme at WRS.

“We can refer to our giant pandas by name, and that is an exciting development for us, especially since these names were submitted by Singaporeans. These are meaningful and beautiful names, chosen to reflect the symbolic ties we have with China, and the future these pandas will have in Singapore. People here have shown tremendous support for our giant panda conservation programme and we hope the community will continue to demonstrate their commitment to wildlife conservation,” said Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, WRS.

Added Mr Chen Jiang, Cultural Counsellor, Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in Singapore: “The bond between Singapore and China is one that is built on mutual trust and respect, and the two giant pandas are an expression of that close friendship. They also mark the commitment to conserve and safeguard the existence of these endangered animals.”

Mr Lim Chin Beng, Chairman of CapitaLand Hope Foundation, the philanthropic arm of CapitaLand, said: “These symbolic names reflect the strong bilateral relationship between Singapore and China over the last 20 years, and will further strengthen the close friendship and economic ties between the two countries going forward. The Giant Panda collaborative programme will raise cultural exchange and understanding between Singapore and China, and also promote wildlife conservation education among the young. It is against this backdrop that CapitaLand, as a responsible corporate citizen in Singapore and China, is proud to be the Presenting Sponsor and Conservation Donor of the programme.”

The duo – a three-year-old male and his two-year-old female companion – will arrive in Singapore next year, as part of a joint collaboration between WRS and China Wildlife Conservation Association (CWCA) to raise awareness for the conservation of these gentle creatures, and the development of a breeding programme for these critically endangered animals. The pandas also represent the close diplomatic relations between Singapore and China. Singapore is the seventh country to receive giant pandas from China since 1994.

The person whose entry was picked by the judges is a 38 year old Singaporean, Ms Angeline Fong, who will receive a complimentary three-night stay at any Ascott serviced residence worldwide, an exclusive preview of the giant panda exhibit when it opens in 2012, and other attractive prizes.

The two furry black and white envoys are due to arrive in early 2012 and will be housed at WRS’ upcoming attraction, the River Safari, Asia’s first river-themed park. Visitors at the River Safari will be able to observe the giant pandas up close in an environment similar to that of their natural habitat, naturally landscaped with a lush bamboo forest, shallow streams, trees and boulders for the animals to explore and play.

Giant Pandas are among the rarest bear species in the world with less than 1,600 left in the wild. They are classified as endangered under the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List of Threatened Species. The population of giant pandas in the wild continues to dwindle due to the loss and destruction of their natural habitat.

For more information, please visit www.riversafari.com.sg

Jia Jia - the female Giant Panda

Kai Kai - the male Giant Panda

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