FIREFLIES AND LANTERNS LIGHT UP SINGAPORE ZOO ON MID-AUTUMN NIGHT

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WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE, WITH SINGAPORE ENVIRONMENT COUNCIL AND SINGAPORE MANUFACTURERS’ FEDERATION, PIONEERS MOON NIGHT 2011 TO CELEBRATE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND FAMILY TOGETHERNESS

Singapore, 11 Sep 2011 – For the first time, Singapore Zoo opened its doors to the public this evening for the inaugural Moon Night 2011 in celebration of the Mid-Autumn festival. Jointly organised by Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS), Singapore Environment Council (SEC) and Singapore Manufacturers’ Federation (SMa), the event hopes to raise awareness for nature conservation and biodiversity, while promoting family togetherness.

The main highlight of the evening was the release of fireflies into the forested area at the zoo by President Tony Tan Keng Yam, in an effort to reintroduce this distinctive species of insects into the mangrove ecosystem.

Dr Tony Tan and Mr George Huang, President of SMa also placed floating lanterns in the waters of Upper Seletar Reservoir. Visitors to the park were encouraged to buy the lanterns, with all proceeds donated to the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund (WRSCF), which was set up with the purpose of conserving Singapore’s endangered native wildlife.

“Other than assisting our members in commercial interests, SMa is also conscious of and promotes good corporate social responsibility, including environment, work-life balance, culture and conservation in our members’ companies. We appreciate and support the great work of WRS and SEC, and will continue to work with them to engender environmentally conscious behaviour in our members and staff,” said Mr Huang.

Other festivities included the recounting of the story of Chang Er and her companion, the jade rabbit, and an animal petting session with the rabbits at the zoo. Visitors were also educated on the effects of the moon on animal behaviour through fun and interactive performances.

Considered an important date in the Chinese calendar, the Mid-Autumn Festival is a symbol of reunion brought about by the full moon. It traditionally calls for families and friends to gather and admire the bright mid-autumn harvest moon while enjoying delicious moon cakes that is meant to represent people’s pursuit of a round and perfect life.

At the same time, the moon is inextricably linked to the everyday rhythms and rituals of life on earth, as well as the tide. Moon phases have been said to shape the evolution and lives of the animal kingdom, promoting the migratory habits of many animals today.

“We are excited to be organising the first ever Moon Night in the world, as it shows a clear sign of ownership in the pursuit for perfect balance and harmony. Through its special mix of cultural mythology and awareness-raising about biodiversity preservation, Moon Night 2011 is a great opportunity for families to spend quality time together during the Mid-Autumn festival at a unique location, while allowing WRS and SEC to educate Singaporeans on holistic approaches to wildlife and nature conservation,” said Isa Loh, Group CEO, WRS.

“SMa is happy to be part of this innovative and interesting event. It gives, not just our members, but also the families of their employees, the opportunity to gather as one big family,” added Mr Huang.

The release of fireflies is significant as the population continues to dwindle in Singapore due to urbanisation.

“On this special day while we celebrate the full moon, we are also encouraging the balance of life on earth as animal cycles and rituals are known to coincide with moon phases. On behalf of WRS and SEC, I would like to thank President Tony Tan and Mr George Huang, President of SMa, for celebrating and reinforcing the message of Moon Night with us,” added Ms Loh, who is also Chairman of the Singapore Environment Council.

(L-R) President Tony Tan Keng Yam leading the lantern procession at the Singapore Zoo with his granddaughter and Mr George Huang, President, Singapore Manufacturers’ Federation.

Ms Isa Loh, Group CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore (far left), President Tony Tan, and Mr George Huang, President of Singapore Manufacturers’ Federation (far right) celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival with members of the public at the Singapore Zoo’s inaugural Moon Night 2011 event.

WORLD’S LARGEST BIRD PARADISE – JURONG BIRD PARK – TURNS 40

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YEAR-LONG CELEBRATIONS KICK OFF WITH PARK DISCOUNTS, SOUVENIR GIVEAWAYS AND FACEBOOK CONTESTS

Singapore, 4 January 2011Jurong Bird Park, one of four wildlife attractions managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS), with the others being Night Safari, Singapore Zoo and the upcoming River Safari, celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, by offering discounts off admission prices and gifts to selected visitors.

From now till the end of January, Singaporeans and Permanent Residents who turn 40 this year get 40% off admission ticket prices. From 3-9 January, those who celebrated their 40th birthday on 3 Jan 2011 will get free admission into the park, and the first 40 who come in also get an exclusive Bird Park 40th anniversary T-shirt and a cute plush toy.

Next month, celebrations continue with a Facebook contest to encourage couples to share their 40 years of romantic moments at the park. Couples will be asked to dust off their old photo albums and post pictures of them during their courtship days or weddings. Winners will walk away with free admission tickets and a limited edition Valentine’s Day YooHoo plush toy.

Other exciting activities planned for the year include a wildlife photography contest, as well as the launch of a play area for kids at the park and a brand new Birds of Prey show.

Opened on 3 January 1971, Jurong Bird Park is the first wildlife park to be established in Singapore and is today the largest bird park in the world. Situated on a 20.2-hectare hillside, the award-winning park is a haven for 4,600 birds representing 380 of the world‟s bird species. As the oldest wildlife park here, it is an excellent model of success, spearheading avian conservation and education infused with fun recreation for both young and old, locals and tourists.

Over the years, the Bird Park has made significant strides towards establishing itself as the region’s leading institution for the conservation of avian biodiversity. In the area of ex-situ conservation, it has a Breeding and Research Centre tasked to ensure the welfare, breeding and promulgation of birdlife, and has won several accolades for its breeding programmes.

For example, it was the first park in the world to successfully breed the black hornbill in captivity in 1995 and the twelve-wired Bird of Paradise for which the park received the Breeders‟ Award from the American Pheasant and Waterfowl Society in 2001. In 2006, the Bird Park received the Conservation & Research Award for the Oriental Pied Hornbill Conservation Project by IV International Symposium on Breeding Birds in Captivity (ISBBC). More recently in 2010, the park successfully bred and hatched the highly endangered red fronted macaw, hyacinth macaw and the near threatened great pied hornbill species in captivity. Committed to conservation, research and providing the best possible veterinary care to the birds in the park, the world class Avian Hospital was established in 2006. It is also Singapore‟s designated avian rescued centre for the treatment and rehabilitation of wild birds. The Bird Park frequently collaborates with relevant government agencies in re-introducing indigenous species back into the wild, such as the oriental pied hornbill in its most recent project.

In addition, the park is one of Singapore’s most popular tourist and family destinations. Key attractions such as the Bird Discovery Centre, African Waterfall Aviary, Lory Loft, Southeast Asian Birds Aviary, and the newly launched Penguin Coast as well as its daily shows attracted close to 900,000 visitors in 2009. The S$1.9 million Penguin Coast exhibit features six penguin species, one third of the world‟s total penguin species. It features the African Penguin, one of few species which live in the tropics, as well as five species of cold climate penguins in the indoor climate-controlled den of the exhibit. It was launched to spread greater awareness for the conservation of penguins by bringing visitors up close to these endearing birds.

”2011 represents a milestone for us at the Jurong Bird Park. It is a time for us to look back on our achievements and look ahead to new horizons. We have come a long way since our humble beginnings in the 1970s. Today, the Bird Park is a shining example of the successful integration of conservation, education and recreation. This is possible only with the passion and dedication shown by our staff towards the WRS mission of preserving birdlife biodiversity and spreading the message of conservation„, said Ms Fanny Lai, Group CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

“We hope Singaporeans will continue to have fond memories of their wonderful times spent at the Bird Park by participating in our 40th anniversary festivities throughout the year. Now would be a good time to pay yet another visit to the park and take a walk down memory lane by re-living those cherished moments,” she added.

For more information and the latest updates on the Jurong Bird Park‟s 40th anniversary celebrations, please visit www.birdpark.com.sg, or logon to the Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s Facebook page.

Front entrance of Jurong Bird Park (1985)

Jurong Falls Aviary, Jurong Bird Park (1971 -1980)

Visitors queuing up at front admission to purchase tickets (1971 – 1980)

Old tram system, Jurong Bird Park (1971 -1980)

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