20 YEARS OF FUN IN THE DARK WITH NIGHT SAFARI

– Home-grown attraction is world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals.
– Recipient of multiple accolades, including 11 awards in Best Visitor Attraction category.

Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong and Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore officiates Night Safari’s 20th anniversary celebrations. Night Safari is the world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals and was officially opened in 1994 by then Prime Minister Goh.
Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong and Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore officiates Night Safari’s 20th anniversary celebrations. Night Safari is the world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals and was officially opened in 1994 by then Prime Minister Goh.

Singapore, 23 May 2014 – The world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals, Singapore’s Night Safari, marked its 20th Anniversary with an evening celebration graced by the Guest of Honour who also officiated the park opening in 1994, Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong.

“Night Safari is a home-grown attraction that has gained a reputation on the world’s stage for the unique, immersive wildlife experience we provide our visitors. It is a park where Singaporeans love to take their foreign visitors to at night, and has been so for the last 20 years,” said Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Night Safari was conceptualised by the same visionaries who created the critically acclaimed Singapore Zoo. Since opening on 26 May 1994, the park provides local residents and tourists an insight into the mystery of the tropical jungle at night by displaying a wide range of nocturnal animals in natural settings, and also filled a critical void in night-time attractions in Singapore.

The late Dr Ong Swee Law, founder and Executive Chairman of Singapore Zoo, in his project proposal for Night Safari wrote, “Nothing like the Night Safari can be found anywhere else in the world: it is truly unique.” He also highlighted that it makes good sense to view zoo animals at night since 90% of tropical mammals (excluding primates) are nocturnal, coupled with the fact that with regular sunsets occurring around 7.30pm and cool nights, Singapore is an ideal geographical location for a night zoo.

Today, Night Safari stands at the forefront of wildlife conservation, adopting innovative approaches to conservation science, partnership and research. The park opened the world’s first Sunda pangolin exhibit, and successfully bred the endangered species native to Singapore.

Ms Chiang said, “Beyond being a must-see recreational destination, we strive for excellence in wildlife conservation and have over the 20 years been successful in captive breeding of endangered species like the native Sunda pangolin, Malayan tapir, and Asian elephant.”

Night Safari, the world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals, celebrated its 20th anniversary with guest-of-honour Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, who officiated the park’s opening in 1994. Left: Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, and Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore
Night Safari, the world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals, celebrated its 20th anniversary with guest-of-honour Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, who officiated the park’s opening in 1994. Left: Ms Claire Chiang, Chairman, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, and Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Over the past 20 years, Night Safari has constantly been renewing and rejuvenating its animal collection and product offerings to improve visitor experience. Notably, in 2003 the park launched the Creatures of the Night Show in a new amphitheater, and the Thumbuakar fire performance just two years later.

To commemorate Night Safari’s 20th Anniversary, the park will officially introduce a pair of white lions in addition to officially launching two new exhibits featuring Asiatic black bears and Malayan tigers that would be the finale to the park’s 35-minute tram experience.

Visitors to the park in the month of June will enjoy the 20th Anniversary festivities, which include energising fire performances by the wildly popular Thumbuakar group, talented shadow cutters, and glittery face-painters that help bring out the mystery of the night.

Night Safari, the world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals, celebrated its 20th anniversary. Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, who officiated the park’s opening in 1994, graced the event and took a ride on the tram.
Night Safari, the world’s first zoo for nocturnal animals, celebrated its 20th anniversary. Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, who officiated the park’s opening in 1994, graced the event and took a ride on the tram.

SWEET SURPRISE FOR NIGHT SAFARI’S OLDEST MALAYAN TAPIR

Manis the Malayan tapir celebrates her 35th birthday at world’s first safari park for nocturnal animals.

Away from the public eye, Manis’ keepers donned black and white polka dotted party hats in her honour and toasted her to many more happy, healthy years as she chomped on her birthday cake, made with her favourite food, including bread, watermelon, papaya and honeydew. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE
Away from the public eye, Manis’ keepers donned black and white polka dotted party hats in her honour and toasted her to many more happy, healthy years as she chomped on her birthday cake, made with her favourite food, including bread, watermelon, papaya and honeydew. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 1 April 2014Night Safari’s oldest Malayan tapir, Manis, turned 35 years old on 24 March 2014, and celebrated her birthday in style. She is also one of the region’s oldest Malayan tapirs under human care.

Manis, whose name means ‘sweet’ in Malay, tucked into a lovingly created layered cake consisting of bananas, bread and watermelons, surrounded by honeydew and papaya balls, and blended carrots and fruit sticks spelling out her name and age. The celebrations took place in the back of house yard, away from the public eye.

Night Safari currently has 10 tapirs in her collection; another two reside in Singapore Zoo. Between the two parks, 27 Malayan tapirs have been born. The last birth occurred on 3 June 2013, and happens to be Manis’ great-granddaughter.

Malayan tapirs are the largest of the five species of tapir, and the only one native to Asia. Listed as endangered on the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species, threats include habitat loss and fragmentation, and increasingly, hunting pressure.

*IUCN: International Union for the Conservation of Nature

ASIA’S FIRST GIANT RIVER OTTER BABY AMONG MORE THAN 400 BIRTHS AT WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Wildlife Reserves Singapore marks World Animal Day with tribute to babies born at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo.

Singapore, 3 October 2013Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) marks World Animal Day with a presentation of furry, feathery and slithery babies born in Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo. The four parks saw more than 400 animal babies born between January and August this year, charming visitors with their adorable antics.

Among the most exciting births at WRS is that of Asia’s first giant river otter baby at River Safari. Born on 10 August, the unnamed male pup now weighs 1.6kg and measures 60cm. While it may be small now, giant otters can grow to an incredible length of 1.8m and weigh up to 34kg. River Safari is the first zoological institution in Asia to feature the endangered giant river otter, the largest of the world’s 13 otter species. Found only in South American river systems, giant otters are ferocious predators that hunt piranhas, anacondas and even caimans, earning them the title “river wolves”. Often hunted extensively for their fur and threatened by habitat loss, these river giants are now amongst the rarest otters in the world.

Since its birth on 10 August, Asia’s first giant river otter baby and his mother have been left alone in their den to bond. In a few weeks’ time, the pup will enter River Safari’s Amazon Flooded Forest exhibit where his parents will teach him how to swim. The parents, Carlos and Carmen, are from Germany’s Hamburg and Duisburg Zoo respectively, and arrived in Singapore in August 2012 as part of an animal exchange and breeding programme.
Since its birth on 10 August, Asia’s first giant river otter baby and his mother have been left alone in their den to bond. In a few weeks’ time, the pup will enter River Safari’s Amazon Flooded Forest exhibit where his parents will teach him how to swim. The parents, Carlos and Carmen, are from Germany’s Hamburg and Duisburg Zoo respectively, and arrived in Singapore in August 2012 as part of an animal exchange and breeding programme.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “We have maintained an excellent record of success in our captive breeding programme, and visitors to our parks are often pleasantly surprised to find adorable animal babies. The landmark birth of Asia’s first giant river otter baby represents the culmination of efforts and dedication of our zoology team in adopting and maintaining the highest standards of husbandry. With increasing threats such as habitat destruction and poaching, captive breeding programmes play a pivotal role in conserving threatened species for our future generations.”

Malayan tapir Putri, born on 3 June, enjoys her forest floor playtime at Night Safari. The Malayan tapir is one of the most endangered animals in Southeast Asia. Populations are declining due to poaching and habitat loss from deforestation for agricultural purposes.
Malayan tapir Putri, born on 3 June, enjoys her forest floor playtime at Night Safari. The Malayan tapir is one of the most endangered animals in Southeast Asia. Populations are declining due to poaching and habitat loss from deforestation for agricultural purposes.

Aside from the birth of the giant otter, over 100 species were born or hatched in the four WRS parks, of which 37 are classified as threatened in the *IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. These include the orang utan, manatee, hyacinth macaw and Malayan tapir. Through the years, WRS parks have exchanged many of these animals with other reputable zoos for breeding purposes.

*International Union for Conservation of Nature