NATIVE BIRDS TAKE FLIGHT AHEAD OF SINGAPORE’S INAUGURAL NATIVE BIRDS’ DAY

– Jurong Bird Park spearheads event to heighten appreciation for native birds with support from National Parks Board.
– Two pairs of native birds to be placed in a purpose-built aviary at Ang Mo Kio Town Garden West as part of a multi-agency rescue and rehabilitation programme.

To mark the upcoming inaugural Native Birds’ Day spearheaded by Jurong Bird Park, a pair of black-naped orioles (left) and pink-necked green pigeons will be placed in an aviary as part of a joint rescue and rehabilitation effort with NParks.
To mark the upcoming inaugural Native Birds’ Day spearheaded by Jurong Bird Park, a pair of black-naped orioles (left) and pink-necked green pigeons will be placed in an aviary as part of a joint rescue and rehabilitation effort with NParks.

Singapore, 15 November 2013 – White-rumped shamas, emerald doves, Oriental magpie robins, green pigeons and Oriental white-eyes. What do all these have in common? These are more than 100 species of birds native to Singapore.

Jurong Bird Park with the support of National Parks Board (NParks) and Nature Society of Singapore (NSS), will be organising a two-day festival to celebrate the inaugural Native Birds’ Day on 23 November 2013. The festival, to be held on 23 and 24 November 2013, is designed to build greater appreciation for native birds.

“Birds play an important part in our rich biodiversity, especially native birds. However, not many of us are aware of their existence, and the role they play to maintain the balance in our biodiversity. Jurong Bird Park is coming together with National Parks Board and Nature Society of Singapore to bring native birds to the fore so we can develop greater appreciation for them and to ensure they continue to thrive in the community,” said Mr Lee Meng Tat, CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

He continued, “The Native Birds’ Day Festival is a weekend where we want to bring everyone together to celebrate our native birds and get everyone to learn about them in a fun and engaging way.”

To mark the upcoming Native Birds’ Day, Jurong Bird Park and NParks will join hands to place a pair of pink-necked green pigeons and a pair of black-naped orioles into a purpose-built rehabilitation aviary. These two pairs of native birds were brought to Jurong Bird Park by a member of the public.

Three of the four were juveniles when they were brought to the Bird Park. The veterinarians had to rehabilitate and nurse them back to health, and this included hand-raising them until the birds were old enough to eat on their own. As part of the rehabilitation process, they will remain in the aviary for 7 days so that they can get used to their surroundings before they are released. This activity is part of the two agencies’ efforts to conserve the native bird population in Singapore.

“The aviary at Ang Mo Kio Town Garden West will offer the birds a lush and green environment to rehabilitate before they are released back into the wild. The aviary, the first of its kind in a town park, is made possible with the support of the community at Ang Mo Kio. Volunteers have been conducting bi-monthly surveys at the park, and you might be surprised to know that more than 15 species of birds have been sighted in Ang Mo Kio Town Garden West. Such collaborations show that everyone has a part to play in realising Singapore’s City in a Garden vision.” said Ms Kartini Omar, Director of Parks, NParks.

The activities planned during Native Birds’ Day Festival at Jurong Bird Park* include –

Native Birds Day Festival

To commemorate Native Birds’ Day, Jurong Bird Park will be offering a 50 per cent off its adult admission tickets to those who sign up for the Native Birds’ Day expert forum on 23 November 2013. Members of the public are to sign up for the forum by emailing the following details to corpcoms.jbp@wrs.com.sg before 20 November 2013 –

– Name
– Email Address
– Phone Number
– Number of tickets required

Each participant will be allowed to purchase up to two admission tickets at the special discounted rate.

*Activities are free but park admission charges apply

WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE CONSERVATION FUND OPENS GRANT APPLICATIONS

AREAS FOR CONSIDERATION: NATIVE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION FOCUSING ON BIRDLIFE AND OTHER ANIMALS IN DANGER, AND IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON CONSERVATION

Singapore, 10 December 2009Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund (WRSCF) announces that it is now accepting grant applications for project proposals from interested parties working toward conserving endangered native wildlife. The grant applications will be for conservation and related research work on birds, native wildlife in danger and impact of climate change on conservation, in Singapore.

“As a conservation fund with the objective to sustain endangered native wildlife and ecosystems, we encourage like-minded individuals or organisations to come forward and submit their proposed scope of study of wildlife that are unique to our nation. From these efforts and studies, we hope to make concrete progress on the conservation front and to raise public awareness of native species,” said Ms Fanny Lai, Group CEO, Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

WRSCF is designed to provide accessible and flexible grants for persons who want to contribute to the conservation of native wildlife species. To be eligible, the scope of study needs to include at least one of these elements: conservation-related scientific research, direct field conservation work, education and public awareness, human-animal conflict resolution or capacity building and the sharing of best practices.

Thus far, National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Ah Meng Memorial Conservation Fund is the first grant recipient of $500,000 over a five-year period. The amount will support NUS students and faculty members conducting academic research and studies pertaining to endangered wildlife.

WRSCF grant applications will be reviewed by the Specialist Panel comprising scientists, academics and representatives from government agencies such as National Parks Board (NParks), Agri-food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA), National Institute of Education (NIE), NUS, Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research (RMBR) and Nature Society of Singapore (NSS).

With the establishment of WRSCF, parties keen to embark on projects contributing to the conservation of native endangered wildlife will have a financial avenue to support their cause. Application forms and guidelines can be downloaded from http://www.wrscf.org.sg.

NEW CONSERVATION FUND PROMISES A BOOST TO LOCAL WILDLIFE

– WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE CONSERVATION FUND LAUNCHED TO PROTECT AND SAVE SINGAPORE’S NATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES
– NUS, FIRST RECIPIENT, WILL EMBARK ON A STUDY OF SINGAPORE’S NATIVE BANDED LANGUR
– S$1 MILLION SEED FUND FROM WRS; 20 CENTS FROM EVERY ENTRANCE TICKET  (TO JBP, NS SZ) SOLD DONATED TO WRSCF SINCE APRIL 1, 2009

Singapore, 10 July 2009Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS/新加坡野生动物保育集团) today launched an independent conservation fund to protect and save Singapore’s native endangered species.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund (WRSCF/新加坡野生动物保育基金) is dedicated to wildlife conservation and education. Its focus will be on native animal conservation efforts and the issue of climate change. Additionally, it will support the Ah Meng Memorial Conservation Fund, set up in conjunction with the National University of Singapore.

This will be achieved through direct field conservation work, education and public awareness, human-animal conflict resolution, capacity building and sharing of best practices.

“Singapore’s rich biodiversity is home to a lush variety of flora and fauna, including the pangolin, flying lemur and banded langur. Unfortunately, many Singaporeans are unaware of what wildlife can be found locally and even when informed, they tend to take these animals for granted. We would like to encourage more organisations and individuals to join us in preserving our natural heritage. In support of conservation, WRS has made a contribution of S$1,000,000 in seed money to the Fund,” says Ms Claire Chiang (张齐娥), newly appointed Chairperson of the WRSCF.

In addition, WRS has started contributing 20 cents from every entrance ticket sold to any of its three parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari and the Singapore Zoo. This will anchor the funds for the WRSCF. Public donations are also welcome.

The first recipient is the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Ah Meng Memorial Conservation Fund, which will receive S$500,000 over five years. This will support the academic research and study of endangered native wildlife undertaken by students and faculty members of NUS.

“We are honoured to be the first recipient of the fund as it definitely helps in furthering our cause to learn and gather information on data deficient animals. It is our duty as Singaporeans to seek new facts and records of our wildlife, and in the process train and develop future local conservationists,” says Professor Leo Tan (陈伟兴教授), Director (Special Projects), National University of Singapore. The first project to receive funding from the NUS’ Ah Meng Memorial Conservation Fund is a study on the banded langur, one of Singapore’s native endangered wildlife.

WRSCF will also be partnering with NGOs such as the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) of New York, to advance public education and awareness. Some of the issues that will be addressed include the illegal wildlife and bushmeat trade, that Singaporeans may unknowingly contribute to when they consume exotic dishes while overseas.

Individuals and organisations will soon be able to submit project proposals to WRSCF. Funding support will be subjected to approval by an independent Specialist Panel comprising professionals from National Parks Board (NParks), Agri-food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA), National Institute of Education (NIE), NUS, Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research (RMBR), Nature Society of Singapore (NSS) and Singapore Science Centre.

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