CANOLA THE MANATEE IS RIVER SAFARI’S NEW ANIMAL ICON

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Lovingly raised by human caregivers as a calf, Canola makes a big splash with her special story; June is Manatee Madness month at River Safari with new behind-the-scenes tour with Canola

Left: Canola, the first manatee to be hand-raised by keepers in River Safari, is now the park’s animal icon who will act as the wildlife ambassador for her kind and threatened animal species in the wild.
Right: For the month of June, guests to River Safari can sign up for a special behind-the-scenes tour with Canola, where they can observe how aquarists feed baby manatees and conduct operant conditioning with Canola.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE, 25 May 2016 – Canola the manatee has a dramatic life story, to say the least. Abandoned as a calf, her keepers came to the newborn’s rescue to ensure her survival. Today, barely two years old, her fortunes have taken another upswing as Canola is named the animal icon of River Safari.

Born 6 August 2014, Canola was abandoned by her mother. Without her mother’s milk, the infant’s life was in serious danger. To give her a chance at survival, River Safari’s aquarists dived in to render round-the-clock care for the newborn. Canola had to be bottle-fed every two to three hours during the first three months of her life. To increase her fat intake and substitute her mother’s highly nutritious milk, Canola was given a special milk formula infused with canola oil, which inspired her name.

Canola was successfully reintroduced to the manatee herd under the doting care and great team effort of her human caregivers in 2014, and can now be seen swimming along with the herd in the world’s largest freshwater aquarium—River Safari’s Amazon Flooded Forest.

In her new role as River Safari’s animal icon, Canola will be the wildlife ambassador for her species and all threatened wildlife in the wild. River Safari is home to 14 West Indian manatees, six of which are male while the rest are female. Manatees are listed as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Their numbers have declined in the last century due to hunting pressures, entrapment in commercial nets and collisions with propellers and motorboats.

Through captive breeding of manatees, River Safari hopes to contribute to the species’ population. Over 10 manatees have been born in Singapore. The park has plans to repatriate two manatees to Guadeloupe in the Caribbean as part of a breeding programme to repopulate the region where wild manatees have become extinct for the past 100 years.
Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Deputy Chief Executive Officer and Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Canola is the first manatee hand-raised by aquarists in River Safari. To ensure her health and wellbeing, her keepers have maintained a very close bond with her through ongoing medical training sessions. By making Canola an icon and ambassador animal, we hope her life story will inspire our guests to join in our conservation efforts to save threatened freshwater wildlife.”

As a hand-raised manatee, Canola is accustomed to close contact with humans. Guests at River Safari can get an up-close encounter with Canola over the June holidays if they sign up for a special behind-the-scenes tour. Aquarists will demonstrate how they hand-raise baby manatees, and work with Canola on operant conditioning exercises where the manatee is trained to roll over for medical procedures such as injections and ultrasound scans.

Mr Keith So, Deputy Head Aquarist, River Safari, said, “Canola has a special place in our hearts. Despite having a rough start to her life, she has developed a very gentle, kind and patient nature. It was a unanimous decision to select her as our animal icon.”
In line with Canola’s new role as River Safari’s animal icon, a series of illustrations which depict various facets of her personality has been developed. These capture her in different poses and should endear Canola to people of all ages.

 

canola

 

 

Left: Canola the manatee is River Safari’s new animal icon and a series of illustrations depicting various facets of her personality has been developed.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

 

On weekends from 4 to 26 June, members of the public can join Manatee Madness in River Safari, which offers a series of manatee-themed activities, a manatee mascot meet-and-greet and an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour with Canola.

BEHIND-THE-SCENES WITH CANOLA
Dates: 11, 19, 25 June 2016
Time: 9.30am to 11.00am
Maximum capacity: 20pax
Fee: $18 per pax
Note: This tour is open to sign ups only and subject to availability. Admission charges of $30 per adult, $20 per child (3 to 12 years old), and $15 per senior citizen (above 60 years old) apply

To sign up for the tour, visit https://estore.wrs.com.sg/education-public-programmes. Signups open on 31 May 2016.

MANATEE MADNESS JUNE HOLIDAY ACTIVITIES
Dates: 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19, 25, 26 June 2016 (weekends only)
Time: 10.00am to 7.00pm (various timings)
Venue: River Safari (activities at various locations around the park)
Fee: Activities are free but admission charges of $30 per adult, $20 per child (3 to 12 years old), and $15 per senior citizen (above 60 years old) apply
For more information on Manatee Madness, visit http://www.riversafari.com.sg/events-promos/manatee-madness.html.

manatee madness

 

RIVER SAFARI’S GIANT PANDAS LOOKING LOVELORN, SIGNAL START OF MATING SEASON

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Giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia ready for second attempt at making a baby panda;
Guests will not be able to see giant pandas for three days during the mating season

A lovelorn Kai Kai_WRS

With the approach of the giant panda mating season, visitors to River Safari’s Giant Panda Forest can expect to see lovelorn Kai Kai (seen above) and his mate Jia Jia displaying some courtship behaviour. Photo Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

SINGAPORE, 23 March 2016  With the approach of the annual panda mating season, River Safari’s giant pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia are gearing up for their second shot at making a baby panda and guests at the park may observe some intriguing courtship behaviour from the pair.

Giant panda mating season is typically from February to May. As early as January, Kai Kai and Jia Jia have shown early signs that the breeding season was going to start soon.

In the coming weeks, visitors can expect to see male panda Kai Kai bleating in his exhibit and scent-marking more frequently. He may also display the flehmen response, a behaviour whereby an animal curls back its upper lip to sniff for pheromones to assess the breeding readiness of its mate. When mating season arrives, female panda Jia Jia will display restless behaviour and bleating to attract the attention of her mate.

Nine-year-old Kai Kai and eight-year-old Jia Jia entered mating season for the first time last April but both natural mating and artificial insemination had been unsuccessful. The experience, however, has armed River Safari’s team of veterinarians and keepers with a better understanding of the endangered bears’ notoriously complex reproduction process. For the coming mating season, vets and keepers have fine-tuned and employed techniques proven to be successful before in other zoos.

To enhance his performance ahead of the breeding season, Kai Kai has been dutifully doing his “sexercise” in his den for months. Panda keepers get Kai Kai to stand up on his hind legs for a few seconds at a time to strengthen his hind quarters. The exercise also serves to improve his stamina which would help to improve success rates during mating.

As with the year before, keepers have continued varying daylight hours and temperature at River Safari’s Giant Panda Forest. This simulates the seasonal transition from winter to spring in their homeland in Sichuan, China, triggering the breeding cycle of the pair—the first of their kind to live so close to the equator.

Kai Kai and Jia Jia also swapped exhibits and dens in January and February. Smelling the scent of another gender stimulates their mating instincts, encouraging hormonal changes.

At present, vets and keepers are carefully observing the behaviour of the two pandas as well as monitoring Jia Jia’s hormonal levels. Once the black and white duo are deemed ready, the pandas will be taken out of their respective exhibits for three days to allow natural mating in the dens. During this mating season of three days, guests to River Safari will not be able to see Kai Kai and Jia Jia in the Giant Panda Forest.

Vets have also collected Kai Kai’s semen for artificial insemination to increase the chances of breeding the pandas should natural mating be unsuccessful.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Kai Kai and Jia Jia are the first giant pandas to live so close to the equator and make an intriguing case study for researchers worldwide. We have learnt much about the care of this endangered species and their breeding behaviour in the last few years, and the team is ready to apply this knowledge and hope for a Singapore baby panda this year.”

 

WOW WILD LEARN PROGRAMME TO PROMOTE USE OF CHINESE LANGUAGE

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A collaboration between the Committee to Promote Chinese Language Learning
and Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Left: Teaching and learning the Chinese Language is set to become more fun and interactive for pre-school teachers and students with the Wow Wild Learning programme, which consists of a series of workshops, activities, and supplementary readings revolving around a learning journey at River Safari. PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Right: Under the Wow Wild Learn programme, Wildlife Reserves Singapore will equip pre-school teachers with nuggets of wildlife information and teaching resources, like a panda storybook, to turn the River Safari into a living classroom for their students. PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

SINGAPORE, 16 February 2016 – Teaching and learning the Chinese Language is set to become even more fun and interactive for pre-school teachers and their students with the Wow Wild Learn programme (娃娃游园乐), which consists of a series of workshops, activities, and supplementary readings revolving around a learning journey at River Safari. The pilot initiative is a collaboration between the Committee to Promote Chinese Language Learning (CPCLL) and Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Ms May Lok, Director of Education, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Education for young children has always been, and will always be, a key pillar for parks managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore. River Safari is no exception. With the pilot Wow Wild Learn programme, we aim to bring the Chinese Language to life in our wildlife environment, and make learning enjoyable for both pre-school teachers and their students.”

Mr Ang Hin Kee, Leader of the Pre-School Working Group, CPCLL, said, “We hope to equip pre-school Chinese Language teachers with more knowledge and material to conduct the learning of Chinese Language in an engaging manner. Parents also play an important role and we want to provide opportunities for them to interact and learn Mandarin together with their children.”

Under the Wow Wild Learn programme, Wildlife Reserves Singapore will offer a half-day training workshop for pre-school teachers to equip them with the necessary knowledge and nuggets of wildlife information to turn River Safari into a living classroom for their students. In addition, the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Education team has also developed activity sheets and two pictorial books as resources for the teachers. Pre-school centres that are successful in their application for the programme will receive subsidized funding from the CPCLL, capped at $700 per centre.

Upon completion of the workshop, pre-school teachers can register their students for the “River Safari Flows to School: I’m a Panda Keeper” outreach programme, where the children’s close encounters with River Safari’s lovable pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia will give them an interactive experience in learning both the Chinese Language and the importance of protecting wildlife.

To promote parent-child bonding, teachers will encourage parents to plan activities that facilitate interaction with their pre-school children in Mandarin. Each student will also receive a set of books on the pandas Kai Kai and Jia Jia.

The Wow Wild Learn programme will be held from 1 April to 31 October 2016. Registration is open to all pre-schools registered under the Early Childhood Development Agency. Invitation has been sent by the CPCLL to eligible pre-school centres, and there has been overwhelming response.

ANIMAL RESIDENTS ENJOY FESTIVE TREATS TO USHER IN YEAR OF THE MONKEY

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Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo roll out enrichment goodies
for wild residents from 6 to 9 Feb 2016

SINGAPORE, 22 January 2016 – The wild residents at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo are ready to swing into the Year of the Monkey with festive enrichment treats specially created by doting keepers. From 6 to 9 February 2016, guests at the four wildlife parks can catch the amusing antics of animals, including a singing parrot wishing everyone “Gong Xi Fa Cai” and giant pandas enjoying their favourite food from larger-than-life ang pows.

For some serious monkey business, head down to Singapore Zoo which is home to over 30 monkey species. Some of the world’s rarest monkeys like the cotton-top tamarin, Javan langur and golden-headed lion tamarin will receive festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. As the monkeys chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights such as oranges, nuts and seeds, guests can marvel at their nimble and agile movements, adore their stunning features, or just snap away for a photo memory.

Other festivities across the four wildlife parks include acrobatic lion dance performances, meet and greet sessions with God of Fortune and Fu Lu Shou mascots, and a Zoodiac trail for guests to discover their fortune forecast in the Year of the Monkey.

CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 1  CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 1-2: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of palm-sized monkeys such as the endangered golden-headed lion tamarins as they chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 1   CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 3-4: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of monkeys such as the threatened Javan langur enjoying festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

ACTIVITIES AT A GLANCECNY Table.jpg

 

For more information, visit wildcny.sg

 

JURONG BIRD PARK, NIGHT SAFARI, RIVER SAFARI AND SINGAPORE ZOO REPORT OVER 700 ANIMAL BIRTHS AND HATCHINGS IN 2015

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Over a third of the babies are native or Southeast Asian species, affirming the parks’ bid to conserve biodiversity in Singapore and Southeast Asia

WRS SZ - Chomel, a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, gave birth to a male on 16 September 2015. Orangutans are Singapore Zoo’s flagship species - 2

Over 700 animal babies were born or hatched in Wildlife Reserves Singapore parks in 2015. Chomel, a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, gave birth on 16 September 2015. The male baby is Chomel’s second offspring—her first son, Bino, is now five years old. Young orangutans will remain with their mother for several years until they learn the necessary skills to live independently. Orangutans are Singapore Zoo’s flagship species. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore, 12 January 2016 – More than 700 furry, feathery and scaly young across 150 species were born or hatched in Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo in 2015. Among them, over 40 species are listed as threatened under the *IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Deputy CEO and Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Each of these births and hatchings is significant and is part of Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s efforts to conserve threatened wildlife, particularly in Singapore and Southeast Asia. Breeding under human care allows us to maintain sustainable populations without having to collect from the wild, and our living collection serves to inspire positive actions in people to conserve our environment and biodiversity.”

Among the most exciting births of the year is that of a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan born on 16 September 2015. The primate is the great-grandson of Singapore Zoo’s late icon, Ah Meng. To date, over 40 orangutans have been born in Singapore Zoo. To facilitate the breeding of these charismatic apes and ensure genetic diversity, orangutans born in the park have been sent to zoological institutions in Malaysia, India, Vietnam, Japan, Australia and New Zealand as part of a worldwide exchange programme.

WRS SZ - Ayana, which means blossoming beauty, is Singapore Zoo’s latest pygmy hippopotamus addition. She was born on 11 April 2015

Ayana, which means blossoming beauty, is Singapore Zoo’s latest pygmy hippopotamus addition. She was born on 11 April 2015 and is the 11th offspring of parents Bubu and Minah. 23 pygmy hippopotamuses have been born in Singapore Zoo in the past 42 years. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

2015 also saw the births of critically endangered cotton-top tamarins, a species of tiny primates, and endangered Southern white rhinoceros and pygmy hippopotamus in Singapore Zoo. The park has an exceptionally impressive track record with all three species, welcoming over 80 cotton-top tamarins, 16 Southern white rhinoceroses and 23 pygmy hippopotamuses in the past 42 years.

WRS RS - River Safari saw two new additions of emperor tamarins – tiny primates with outstanding “facial hair”

River Safari saw two new additions of emperor tamarins – tiny primates with outstanding “facial hair”. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

River Safari welcomed another manatee calf in October, bringing the park’s total herd to 13 individuals. The park also saw the hatchings of unusual amphibians like the fire-bellied newt, a species of small newt native to China, and the births of capybara, super-sized rodents native to South America.

Animal births in Night Safari were particularly exciting as many of the species are from Singapore or Southeast Asia, like Malayan sambar deer, Malayan bearded pig, binturong, hog badger, and the endangered Burmese brow-antlered deer.

Moving beyond the region, Night Safari saw three births of Indian crested porcupines in two years. The park also welcomed two pups to its cackle of spotted hyenas, bringing the park’s total to 11.

WRS NS - Night Safari’s cackle of spotted hyenas added two more to their family in October. Born fully black, the pups slowly develop spots characteristic of the species within months of birth

Night Safari’s cackle of spotted hyenas added two more to their family in October. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Jurong Bird Park continues to be actively involved in the breeding of threatened species, with the hatchings of two Bali mynahs and eight Luzon bleeding-heart doves. The park works closely with Avilon Zoo and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) in the Philippines and Begawan Foundation in Bali, Indonesia, to increase the off-site numbers of these precious birds. The Bali mynah additions in 2015 are particularly special as it is the first time these chicks are hand-raised. All progenies will eventually be sent back to their respective home countries to be released into the wild.

Also joining the park’s avian collection is the lesser bird-of-paradise, the first successful hatching in over a decade. These birds, prized for their beautiful plumage, are notoriously hard to breed in captivity because of their unique courtship rituals prior to mating.

Dr Cheng added, “Captive breeding programmes play an important role in conserving threatened animal species whose numbers are declining as a result of activities like habitat destruction and poaching.  Some of them can be valuable assurance colonies against extinction in the wild, with the aim of ultimate release back to nature, while all of them are ambassadors representing their relatives in the wild.”

*International Union for Conservation of Nature

RIVER SAFARI INVITES VISITORS TO GET TOUCHY WITH NEW EXHIBITS

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River Safari launches touch pool experience and new exhibits featuring the world’s smallest primates, sea stars and prehistoric critters;
Local residents enjoy complimentary boat ride and F&B vouchers in December

RS - Mary River - Touchpool

NEW EXHIBITS AND EXPERIENCES: This December, visitors to River Safari will get to have a feel of fascinating aquatic creatures such as the prehistoric horseshoe crab and chocolate chip sea star. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

SINGAPORE, 30 November 2015 – From marvelling at the prehistoric lungfish to touching some of the ocean’s most fascinating critters, visitors to River Safari can look forward to learning more about riverine and aquatic wildlife with the unveiling of two new exhibits. The exhibits, named River Wonders and Mary River, showcase birds, fishes, mammals and other wildlife found within and around freshwater and marine ecosystems.

Located near the entrance of the park, the new River Wonders aquarium profiles a cross-section of riverine habitats and introduces visitors to the diverse flora and fauna on land and underwater. Close to 30 animal species reside in this exhibit, depicting the rich biodiversity in river habitats. Visitors can spot the endangered golden-headed lion tamarin and admire jewel-coloured fishes such as the pearl gourami and celestial pearl danio. This exhibit is also home to the light-coloured silvery marmoset – one of the world’s smallest monkeys – displayed for the first time in River Safari.

RS - River Wonders - Silvery marmoset 1

NEW EXHIBITS AND EXPERIENCES: This December, visitors to River Safari will get to meet some of the world’s smallest monkeys such as the silvery marmoset (above) and the endangered golden-headed lion tamarin. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The new Mary River zone provides an overview of a river’s journey as it empties itself into coastal mangrove forests and eventually into seas and oceans. With over 20 animal species, this zone is divided into three sections to showcase river, mangrove and marine ecosystems. This includes an interactive exhibit where visitors can dip their hands into a touch pool for a feel of aquatic creatures such as the sea star and the horseshoe crab – a living fossil that has existed since millions of years ago. Other unusual species in the Mary River zone include the air-breathing Australian lungfish that can survive for a few days out of water, as well as the sharp-shooting archerfish which squirts water from its mouth to attack its prey.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “The new attractions represent our commitment in creating immersive wildlife experiences by continually refreshing our animal collection and revamping existing exhibits. Through seeing, understanding and even touching some of these aquatic species, we hope visitors will appreciate the wonders of freshwater and marine ecosystems and be inspired to protect them for future generations.”

From 1 to 31 December, Singaporeans, permanent residents and employment pass holders enjoy one complimentary boat ride and a $5 F&B voucher with every purchase of a River Safari admission ticket*. Those who purchase tickets online can save up to 15%. Visitors can take part in various fun-filled activities including photo contests as well as meet and greet sessions with mascots (Saturdays and Sundays). Kids can go on an adventure trail to learn more about freshwater wildlife at different river zones.

In addition, park-goers can also join River Trails, a guided walk filled with up-close animal encounters and interesting information about the animal residents during feeding time. This trail is conducted twice daily at 10.15am and 2pm with no additional charge.

The touch pool experience is available between 10.30am to 6.30pm on weekends and public holidays. On weekdays, it is available between 10.30am to 1pm and 2.30pm to 6.30pm. River Safari opens daily from 10am to 7pm.

*Terms and conditions apply. More information can be found on theriveriscalling.sg.

BE WHISKED AWAY BY FAIRY TALE MAGIC AT SAFARI BOO

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River Safari’s trick or treat event returns with new live-action performances, free admission for kids and an enchanting night with fairy tale characters

SINGAPORE, 8 October 2015 – Dress up the kids in costume ball finery for the cutest trick or treat event in town, and be mesmerised as little ones dance and mingle with fairy tale characters at River Safari’s annual Safari Boo this October.

Back for the second year, Safari Boo 2015 will see River Safari transformed into a fantastical wonderland where kids can go trick-or-treating, discover river monsters at twilight and enjoy two specially themed presentations, among other festivities. Children aged 12 years and below enjoy free admission from 6pm* on event nights.

Ms Isabel Cheng, Chief Marketing Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: “Safari Boo’s merry-not-scary proposition provides an opportunity for families and children to have trick or treat fun without the fright, and gives little ones and adults a chance to play make-believe and dress creatively. We are thrilled by the strong turnout during its launch last year, and look forward to welcoming more visitors this year with more characters, interactive discovery stations, performances and animal encounters for an educational and fun night.”

Safari Boo 2015 features two all-new shows titled Furry Tales and Be My Guests Royal Ball. Furry Tales puts a twist on familiar tales such as Snow White and Puss in Boots. Animal superstars will thrill audiences with their natural behaviours and friendly characters will showcase creatures such as the slithery snake and owl, and debunk the myths surrounding them. For fun fairy tale pageantry, join Fairy Godmother at Be My Guests Royal Ball where the best dressed will be crowned in this music-filled spectacle for kids.

More than 150 visitors, including costume-clad kids from Tao Nan School, Zhangde Primary School and Between Two Trees Preschool attended a special preview of River Safari’s annual Safari Boo on 7 October 2015. In addition to trick or treat trails and fairy tale characters such as Geppetto and Pinocchio (above), Safari Boo 2015 features interactive discovery stations and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm.

More than 150 visitors, including costume-clad kids from Tao Nan School, Zhangde Primary School and Between Two Trees Preschool attended a special preview of River Safari’s annual Safari Boo on 7 October 2015. In addition to trick or treat trails and fairy tale characters such as Geppetto and Pinocchio (above), Safari Boo 2015 features interactive discovery stations and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm. Photo by: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

As part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November, visitors can come up-close with animals such as the ball python and great white pelican in a special animal presentation titled Furry Tales.  Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

As part of the Safari Boo festivities in October and November, visitors can come up-close with animals such as the ball python and great white pelican in a special animal presentation titled Furry Tales. Photo by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Learn how animals navigate the woods at night in Hansel & Gretel’s House of Fun and have a scaly encounter with the green iguana (above) at the Friends of the Sea Trick or Treat Trail. Back for the second year, Safari Boo 2015 features a line-up of adorable fairy tale characters, two all-new shows and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm. Photo by: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Learn how animals navigate the woods at night in Hansel & Gretel’s House of Fun and have a scaly encounter with the green iguana (above) at the Friends of the Sea Trick or Treat Trail. Back for the second year, Safari Boo 2015 features a line-up of adorable fairy tale characters, two all-new shows and free admission for children aged 12 years and below from 6pm. Photo by: Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

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