OUR PLAYFUL PRIMATES ARE HAVING AN AFFAIR THIS SCHOOL HOLIDAYS

SINGAPORE ZOO CELEBRATES MAN’S CLOSEST COUSINS WITH ACTIVITIES SHOWCASING OUR COLLECTION OF 39 PRIMATES, ALMOST HALF OF WHICH ARE ENDANGERED.

FROM LEFT: Pic 1: Meet Sumatran Supermom Chomel with her babies during a Primate Affair at Singapore Zoo. Pic 2: Watch the cheeky brown capuchins battle with macadamia nuts during Primate Kingdom Adventure! Pic 3: Call of the Gibbon Trail will allow you to listen to the mesmerising calls of our white handed gibbons
FROM LEFT:
Pic 1: Meet Sumatran Supermom Chomel with her babies during a Primate Affair at Singapore Zoo.
Pic 2: Watch the cheeky brown capuchins battle with macadamia nuts during Primate Kingdom Adventure! Pic 3: Call of the Gibbon Trail will allow you to listen to the mesmerising calls of our white handed gibbons

10 May 2012 – Go bananas at Singapore Zoo’s aptly named Primate Affair this May and June. More than just monkey business, it’ll also have our apes and prosimians elbowing their way into the spotlight at the biggest party to hit this side of Singapore.

Known for their intelligence and dexterity, primates have always fascinated man due to the many similarities we share. Watch as they exhibit some of their skills through various trails and enrichment activities, or get starstruck at our meet and greet session with what we consider royalty at Singapore Zoo. Tumble headlong into the fun and learn about the differences among the various primates along the way! Especially for kids, don’t forget to pick up your binocular freebie on the way in to complete your primate adventure (while stocks last).

Details:
Date: 26, 27 May, 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17 June
Venue: Singapore Zoo (various locations), 80 Mandai Lake Road, Singapore 729826
Time: Activity times are detailed below
Fee: Activities are free
Note: Normal admission rates of $20.00 for adults and $13.00 for children between 3-12 years apply

Activities:

Primate Enrichment Trails and Token Feeding sessions
Like humans, our primate friends need constant stimulation to keep boredom at bay. These innovative enrichment trails were invented by our creative zoology team to keep the creatures’ minds and fingers busy. Visitors will surely be enthralled by the varied skills and amusing behaviour of these amazing animals.

1. Treetops Trail Treats
Start at the cotton top tamarins at the Rainforest Courtyard (just after the entrance) and then venture deeper into the trail to visit our unique saki monkeys. Watch as our frisky critters figure out how to get to their delicious treats.

Venue: Rainforest Courtyard/Treetops Trail
Time: 10:15am (30 min)

2. Orang Utan Playtime
Singapore Zoo’s flagship species are always enthralling to watch. Spend some time discovering the man of the forest as our keepers share some insights into working with these magnificent creatures. Then, continue to be mesmerised by these gorgeous apes as they have a giggle with gunny sacks.

Venue: Bornean Orang Utan Island and Free-ranging Areas
Time: 11:00am (20 min)

3. Call Of The Gibbon Trail
The primates along Gibbon Island are vocalists extraordinaires! Come listen to their cacophony of cries, in response to pre-recorded calls. There are the black howler monkeys, with their deep throaty cries, gibbons with their territorial whoops and red-ruffed lemurs with their signature ‘barks’!

Venue: Gibbon Island
Time: 1:40pm (20 min)

4. Primate Kingdom Adventure
Want to watch the baboons get ‘tyred’ out? Their enrichment tyre, filled with nuts, sunflower seeds and other treats will get them all hyped up so stay for the action as they passionately pry the goodies out. Our capuchin monkeys get to battle with macadamia nuts instead. Also not to be missed are the Sulawesi crested macaques, spider monkeys and all the other residents at Primate Kingdom!

Venue: Primate Kingdom and Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia
Time: 2:00pm (Primate Kingdom) (30 min), 2:30pm (Hamadryas baboon) (20 min)

5. Fragile Forest Fun and Friends
Meet the lemurs, mandrills and chimpanzees in this trail as they curiously unravel the enrichment surprises thought up by their keepers!

Venue: Fragile Forest, chimpanzee and mandrill exhibit
Time: Starts at Fragile Forest at 4:15pm and ends at chimpanzee at 4.45pm (30 min)

Sumatran Supermom – Meet Chomel and her babies
Proud Sumatran orang utan mother Chomel is following in her famed grandmother Ah Meng’s footsteps, by caring for a baby that is not her own.

Although a first time mother, Chomel has always shown nurturing qualities. In her younger days, she would often be seen helping the younger orang utans navigate the free-ranging areas with ease, teaching them how to test their weight on the branches before moving ahead. When Chomel’s aunt, Sayang, fell gravely ill, she rose to the occasion, taking little cousin Ishta under her nurturing wing, despite already having a baby of her own to care for!

Come say hello to Chomel and her babies, Bino and Ishta, and witness history repeating itself. Ah Meng would’ve been proud!

Venue: Free-ranging Orang Utan (Island)
Time: 1.30pm (10 min)

MIRACLE RODENTS NOW ON EXHIBIT AT SINGAPORE ZOO

– BIZARRE-LOOKING NAKED MOLE RATS MAY HOLD SECRET TO LONGEVITY
– LATEST OFFERING SHOWCASES THESE CURIOUS CREATURES’ UNDERGROUND LIFE

Singapore, 7 March 2012 – They are hairless, buck-toothed and very nearly blind. Pick one of these creatures up and you’ll realise that they smell really bad. It’s probably from all the rolling about in their own fecal matter so they’ll smell like one big happy family. Smelly or not, scientists believe that naked mole rats’ genetic material holds the secret to a long life – they can live over 20 years, almost eight times longer than mice.

These little rodents, only one of two mammals known to have a social structure similar to social insects, now have a huge exhibit all to themselves—Singapore Zoo’s first foray into showcasing such little creatures on a comparatively large scale.

Wrinkled “sausages” with teeth: Naked mole rats have lips that close behind the teeth. This way, they don’t end up with a mouthful of dirt when digging and burrowing!

The exhibit mimics their system of burrows in the wild in order to provide a naturalistic environment for them. Naked mole rats have burrow systems extending up to 4.8 kilometres long in the wild and covering an area as big as six football fields.

Singapore Zoo’s exhibit, measuring 50 square metres, is a scaled-down version of their complex living environment. Constructed with steel and concrete, it also has glass-fronted panels for visitors to view the naked mole rats at work and play. Lighting is kept dim, as these creatures are used to living in dark environments.

Tunnel vision: Guests peering at the naked mole rats in their ‘natural’ home!
Did you know the tunnels are actually completely man-made! This is how the intricate system of tunnels looks like from the back of house area.

To facilitate convenient cleaning, two identical sets of burrow systems were constructed. Each set is washed and switched every month, then lined with pine shavings to keep them clean and relatively odourless. It is hard work, as the components of the exhibit are extremely sturdy – a necessary defense against the strong teeth of these rats. Unfortunately, these little creatures seem to possess superhuman strength, and have already managed to make dents in some of the concrete components, much to the dismay of their keepers!

Though only recently opened, the naked mole rat exhibit is already a popular spot for curious visitors

An interactive element was also added – a pint-sized tunnel for children to crawl through and imagine a day in the life of a naked mole rat. Periscopes and child-friendly interpretive and activity panels complete the educational component of this exhibit.

Mind your head, for these tunnels are made for little humans only

“Having such an accessible and engaging exhibit allows us to observe the behaviour of these fascinating critters closely, as such animals cannot be studied so easily in the wild. Singapore Zoo hopes to be able to contribute to the education and research of this species, and at the same time introduce the lesser-known wonders of nature to our guests,” said Dr Sonja Luz, Director, Conservation, Research and Learning Centre, Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Come visit and learn more about the naked mole rat at Singapore Zoo today! If these little creatures end up contributing to longer lives for all of us one day, you can tell everyone you saw them first at our Zoo!

Note: Daily feeding sessions are held at 11.30am

NIGHT SAFARI’S BABY GIRAFFE MAKES PUBLIC AND BLOGOSPHERE DEBUT

PARK LAUNCHES FIRST-EVER ANIMAL BLOG TO SHOWCASE CALF’S GROWING JOURNEY AND CREATES SINGAPORE’S TALLEST BABY PRAM TO BRING LANKY NEWBORN CLOSER TO PUBLIC

Nalo's Tale

Singapore, 1 March 2012 – For the first time, the Night Safari has launched a blog site to highlight the development of its latest tallest addition – a two-month-old baby giraffe named “Nalo”.

Visitors can now visit http://giraffes.nightsafari.com.sg to watch the progress of the male calf as keepers provide an exclusive look at animal husbandry and care at the world’s first nocturnal zoo. Titled “Nalo’s Tales: Adventures of Night Safari’s Tallest Baby,” the blog will record several of the calf’s first experiences, including his debut in the exhibit, as well as his first solid meal. The blog includes photos, videos and keeper interviews, and is updated weekly.

The baby giraffe will also be making his public ‘appearance’ in a 2.1m-tall baby pram – possibly the tallest in Singapore – at the heart of Orchard Road this Saturday, 3 March 2012, between 12pm to 4.30pm. Shoppers will get to see a replica of the baby giraffe strolling down the shopping district in a pram specially designed for the lanky newborn.

Visitors who wish to meet Nalo in real life can do so by participating in an online contest – “Guess Nalo’s Height” – where winners can win tickets to the Night Safari by guessing Nalo’s latest height on the blog.

Nalo, which means “lovable” in Swahili, is the first giraffe to be born in the Night Safari in three years. Born on December 5 last year, the baby giraffe can now be seen in the exhibit together with his family at Night Safari’s African zone. For more information, visit http://giraffes.nightsafari.com.sg