ANIMAL RESIDENTS ENJOY FESTIVE TREATS TO USHER IN YEAR OF THE MONKEY

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Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo roll out enrichment goodies
for wild residents from 6 to 9 Feb 2016

SINGAPORE, 22 January 2016 – The wild residents at Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo are ready to swing into the Year of the Monkey with festive enrichment treats specially created by doting keepers. From 6 to 9 February 2016, guests at the four wildlife parks can catch the amusing antics of animals, including a singing parrot wishing everyone “Gong Xi Fa Cai” and giant pandas enjoying their favourite food from larger-than-life ang pows.

For some serious monkey business, head down to Singapore Zoo which is home to over 30 monkey species. Some of the world’s rarest monkeys like the cotton-top tamarin, Javan langur and golden-headed lion tamarin will receive festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. As the monkeys chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights such as oranges, nuts and seeds, guests can marvel at their nimble and agile movements, adore their stunning features, or just snap away for a photo memory.

Other festivities across the four wildlife parks include acrobatic lion dance performances, meet and greet sessions with God of Fortune and Fu Lu Shou mascots, and a Zoodiac trail for guests to discover their fortune forecast in the Year of the Monkey.

CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 1  CNY Enrichment - Golden-headed lion tamarins @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 1-2: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of palm-sized monkeys such as the endangered golden-headed lion tamarins as they chomp, dig and crunch their way through festive delights. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 1   CNY Enrichment - Javan langurs @Singapore Zoo 2
Images 3-4: This Lunar New Year, swing over to Singapore Zoo and catch the cute antics of monkeys such as the threatened Javan langur enjoying festive enrichment treats that tease their curiosity and test their problem-solving skills. All four wildlife parks – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo – will roll out festive activities for guests from 6 to 9 February 2016. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

ACTIVITIES AT A GLANCECNY Table.jpg

 

For more information, visit wildcny.sg

 

JURONG BIRD PARK, NIGHT SAFARI, RIVER SAFARI AND SINGAPORE ZOO REPORT OVER 700 ANIMAL BIRTHS AND HATCHINGS IN 2015

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Over a third of the babies are native or Southeast Asian species, affirming the parks’ bid to conserve biodiversity in Singapore and Southeast Asia

WRS SZ - Chomel, a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, gave birth to a male on 16 September 2015. Orangutans are Singapore Zoo’s flagship species - 2

Over 700 animal babies were born or hatched in Wildlife Reserves Singapore parks in 2015. Chomel, a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, gave birth on 16 September 2015. The male baby is Chomel’s second offspring—her first son, Bino, is now five years old. Young orangutans will remain with their mother for several years until they learn the necessary skills to live independently. Orangutans are Singapore Zoo’s flagship species. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore, 12 January 2016 – More than 700 furry, feathery and scaly young across 150 species were born or hatched in Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari, and Singapore Zoo in 2015. Among them, over 40 species are listed as threatened under the *IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Deputy CEO and Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “Each of these births and hatchings is significant and is part of Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s efforts to conserve threatened wildlife, particularly in Singapore and Southeast Asia. Breeding under human care allows us to maintain sustainable populations without having to collect from the wild, and our living collection serves to inspire positive actions in people to conserve our environment and biodiversity.”

Among the most exciting births of the year is that of a critically endangered Sumatran orangutan born on 16 September 2015. The primate is the great-grandson of Singapore Zoo’s late icon, Ah Meng. To date, over 40 orangutans have been born in Singapore Zoo. To facilitate the breeding of these charismatic apes and ensure genetic diversity, orangutans born in the park have been sent to zoological institutions in Malaysia, India, Vietnam, Japan, Australia and New Zealand as part of a worldwide exchange programme.

WRS SZ - Ayana, which means blossoming beauty, is Singapore Zoo’s latest pygmy hippopotamus addition. She was born on 11 April 2015

Ayana, which means blossoming beauty, is Singapore Zoo’s latest pygmy hippopotamus addition. She was born on 11 April 2015 and is the 11th offspring of parents Bubu and Minah. 23 pygmy hippopotamuses have been born in Singapore Zoo in the past 42 years. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

2015 also saw the births of critically endangered cotton-top tamarins, a species of tiny primates, and endangered Southern white rhinoceros and pygmy hippopotamus in Singapore Zoo. The park has an exceptionally impressive track record with all three species, welcoming over 80 cotton-top tamarins, 16 Southern white rhinoceroses and 23 pygmy hippopotamuses in the past 42 years.

WRS RS - River Safari saw two new additions of emperor tamarins – tiny primates with outstanding “facial hair”

River Safari saw two new additions of emperor tamarins – tiny primates with outstanding “facial hair”. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

River Safari welcomed another manatee calf in October, bringing the park’s total herd to 13 individuals. The park also saw the hatchings of unusual amphibians like the fire-bellied newt, a species of small newt native to China, and the births of capybara, super-sized rodents native to South America.

Animal births in Night Safari were particularly exciting as many of the species are from Singapore or Southeast Asia, like Malayan sambar deer, Malayan bearded pig, binturong, hog badger, and the endangered Burmese brow-antlered deer.

Moving beyond the region, Night Safari saw three births of Indian crested porcupines in two years. The park also welcomed two pups to its cackle of spotted hyenas, bringing the park’s total to 11.

WRS NS - Night Safari’s cackle of spotted hyenas added two more to their family in October. Born fully black, the pups slowly develop spots characteristic of the species within months of birth

Night Safari’s cackle of spotted hyenas added two more to their family in October. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Jurong Bird Park continues to be actively involved in the breeding of threatened species, with the hatchings of two Bali mynahs and eight Luzon bleeding-heart doves. The park works closely with Avilon Zoo and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) in the Philippines and Begawan Foundation in Bali, Indonesia, to increase the off-site numbers of these precious birds. The Bali mynah additions in 2015 are particularly special as it is the first time these chicks are hand-raised. All progenies will eventually be sent back to their respective home countries to be released into the wild.

Also joining the park’s avian collection is the lesser bird-of-paradise, the first successful hatching in over a decade. These birds, prized for their beautiful plumage, are notoriously hard to breed in captivity because of their unique courtship rituals prior to mating.

Dr Cheng added, “Captive breeding programmes play an important role in conserving threatened animal species whose numbers are declining as a result of activities like habitat destruction and poaching.  Some of them can be valuable assurance colonies against extinction in the wild, with the aim of ultimate release back to nature, while all of them are ambassadors representing their relatives in the wild.”

*International Union for Conservation of Nature

SAFARI ZOO RUN 2016 TO MARK DEBUT OF NEW AH MENG AT SINGAPORE ZOO

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New icon is closely related to Singapore Zoo’s well-known orangutan; Eighth instalment of popular run will span weekend of 27 and 28 February 2016

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Safari Zoo Run 2016 participants will be able to catch a glimpse of the new Ah Meng when they take part in this year’s instalment of the wildly popular run on 27 and 28 February. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore, 8 January 2016 – A new queen of the wild will look upon the human race at Safari Zoo Run 2016 in Singapore Zoo and reign as the much-awaited animal icon.

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Ah Meng, Singapore Zoo’s beloved Sumatran orangutan who passed away in February 2008, left behind six descendants, one of whom has been identified as the new Singapore Zoo icon. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

The passing of Ah Meng, Singapore Zoo’s famous matriarch and one of Singapore’s most adored personalities, in 2008 left a void in the hearts of many animal lovers and regular zoo visitors. All orangutans in Singapore are commonly referred to as “Ah Meng”. In her memory, the Safari Zoo Run was conceived in 2009.

Ahead of the Safari Zoo Run 2016, Singapore Zoo has identified the orangutan that reign and continue Ah Meng’s legacy.

The upcoming icon is said to share some similarities with her famous predecessor, like a penchant for durians, a big heart for her family, and endearing eyes.  More nuggets about her personality will be shared when the date for Safari Zoo Run draws near.

Safari Zoo Run, Singapore’s wildest race, returns with competitive and family-oriented runs during the weekend of 27 and 28 February 2016. Avid runners can look forward to 10km and 5.5km races while families looking to bond over a healthy walk amidst nature can enjoy a more leisurely pace with the 5.5km or 2.5km family dashes.

The races will transport runners past animal exhibits through scenic paths lined by greenery in Night Safari and Singapore Zoo. A host of carnival festivities awaits family participants after their race, with cheeky animal mascots, educational show and tell sessions, and animal photography opportunities.

The run aims to encourage family bonding and raise awareness on wildlife conservation, with a part of the proceeds going towards aiding the conservation efforts of Singapore Zoo and Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Each participant will receive exclusive Safari Zoo Run apparel and other attractive goodies including Singapore Zoo and River Safari admission, discount vouchers to Jurong Bird Park and Night Safari, and exclusive F&B and retail offers. In addition, all runners will walk away with an exclusive animal-motif finisher medal.

Registration closes on 31 January 2016. For more information, log on to http://www.safarizoo.run.

Details at a glance
Dates and times:
Safari Zoo 10km Challenge / 5.5km Family Run
27 February 2015 (Saturday)
Races    :  7.30am – 12.00pm

Safari Zoo 5km Challenge / 2.5km Kids Dash / 2.5km Family Dash
28 February 2015 (Sunday)
Races    : 7.30am – 12.00pm

Venue:    Night Safari and Singapore Zoo
80 Mandai Lake Road
Singapore 729826

SINGAPORE ZOO BEGINS 10-DAY CELEBRATION FOR INUKA’S 25TH BIRTHDAY

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Zoo launches Our Arctic Future photo exhibition with Royal Danish Embassy to raise awareness on arctic habitat of polar bears; Inuka to enjoy birthday ice treats for 10 days until 26 December

SINGAPORE, 16 December 2015 – Inuka, the first polar bear born in the topics, turns 25 this year and Singapore Zoo has kicked-off a 10-day celebration along with a photo exhibition to raise awareness on the natural arctic habitat of polar bears.

Her Excellency Berit Basse, Ambassador of Denmark to Singapore, officiated the launch at an intimate event held in Singapore Zoo’s Frozen Tundra exhibit on 16 December 2015.

Mr Mike Barclay, Chief Executive Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said, “As Inuka, Singapore’s very own locally born and bred polar bear turns 25, he is officially in his golden years and we will adjust his care to ensure he continues to enjoy a great quality of life with us here in the Singapore Zoo. We are very happy to celebrate his birthday with this excellent Our Arctic Future photo exhibition.”

Our Arctic Future photo exhibition highlights the importance of sustainability and evolving relationships between people and the arctic. It was developed by the Natural History Museum of Denmark in collaboration with the Governments of Greenland and the Faroe Islands for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark. As Singapore approaches the close of its golden jubilee year, the photo exhibition also commemorates 50 years of bilateral relations between Denmark and Singapore.

Inuka is fondly referred to as the “best Christmas present ever” by Singapore Zoo keepers because he was born in his mother’s den in the early hours of 26 December 1990. At 25 years of age, Inuka is a senior bear. His last health check in July this year showed age-related conditions like arthritis and dental issues which the Singapore Zoo veterinary team is closely monitoring. Inuka currently measures 2.5m from nose to tail, and weighs 581kg.

Mr Alan Chan, Chief Executive Officer of Singapore Press Holdings and Director of SPH Foundation, said: “SPH and SPH Foundation have adopted Inuka since his birth 25 years ago. We are happy to see him grow both in size and popularity over the years. We wish Inuka a happy birthday and hope he can bring joy to many for years to come. Through our close partnership with Wildlife Reserves Singapore, we will continue to promote community awareness and responsibility in wildlife protection and conservation, which is one of SPH Foundation’s core objectives.”

During the 10-day celebration, guests at Singapore Zoo can catch Inuka enjoying birthday treats each afternoon at 1.20pm and learn more about the fascinating arctic landscape at the Our Arctic Future photo exhibition at Frozen Tundra.

The public can follow the festivities over the 10-day celebrations via Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts.

 

COME AND BID THE KOALAS A WARM FURRY FAREWELL

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Last chance to see the fuzzy quartet from Down Under before their departure in January 2016

SZ Dec_Koala Farewell Party_Final KV2

The animal residents of Singapore Zoo are coming together to say goodbye to their koala friends this December. Enjoy a spectrum of koala-themed activities at Koalamania! – A Furry Farewell Party at Singapore Zoo every weekend from 5-27 December, and remember to pop by the Australian zone to say your personal farewells to the koalas. PHOTO CREDIT: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Singapore, 27 November 2015 – Koalas Cantik, Sayang, Nila and Manja, who have been guests of Singapore since April this year, will soon pack their bags and head back Down Under. Visitors have until 3 January 2016 to visit the koalas, after which they will be quarantined for a month prior to their departure.

To celebrate their last six months here, and wish them well, Singapore Zoo is throwing a furry farewell party every weekend this December for the lovely quartet previously known as Chan, Idalia, Paddle and Pellita.

The four furry ladies arrived in April this year, and are a precious gift from Australia to Singapore on the occasion of Singapore’s 50th anniversary of independence, and the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Australia and Singapore.

Be part of the celebrations at Singapore Zoo and enjoy koala-themed activities including mascot appearances, game challenges, party crafts, magic shows and an interactive story trail. And don’t forget to pop by the Australian Zone to bid your personal farewells to the koalas!

Koalamania! – A Furry Farewell Party
Date: 5-27 December 2015 (weekends only)
Venue: Singapore Zoo
80 Mandai Lake Road
Singapore 729826
Fee: Activities are free of charge but Singapore Zoo admission rates of $32.00 (adult) and $21.00 (child aged 3 to 12 years) apply
Note: Purchase tickets online to skip the queue and enjoy up to 30% discount on admission

Further details are available at http://www.zoo.com.sg/koala-mania

TALLEST SG50 BABY SPOTTED IN SINGAPORE ZOO

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First giraffe calf in 28 years officially debuts at Wild Africa zone

Singapore Zoo’s first giraffe calf in 28 years looks curiously around his exhibit. The male calf, born on 31 August this year, is the first for mom Roni, and dad Growie, which arrived in Singapore Zoo in 2005, from Israel and the Netherlands respectively.  PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo’s first giraffe calf in 28 years looks curiously around his exhibit. The male calf, born on 31 August this year, is the first for mom Roni, and dad Growie, which arrived in Singapore Zoo in 2005, from Israel and the Netherlands respectively.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE, 12 November 2015 — Singapore Zoo proudly welcomed its first giraffe calf in 28 years on 31 August this year. At a statuesque 1.9 metres, he is the tallest SG50 baby, and is a symbol of Singapore soaring to new heights in the years following its Jubilee celebration.

The calf is the first offspring of both mom Roni and dad Growie, which arrived in Singapore Zoo in 2005, from Israel and the Netherlands respectively. The unnamed calf has since grown 40cm, and now stands at 2.3 metres.

During the calf’s first month, zookeepers kept them separated from the rest of the giraffe herd to allow mother and baby to bond, and to ensure the calf was nursing properly. Keepers also needed time to baby-proof the exhibit as a safety precaution before allowing the calf to explore its new surroundings. Existing barriers had to be modified to ensure the baby can explore the exhibit safely.

Gradually, mother and baby were reintroduced to the other two giraffes in the herd—Growie, the father, and Lucy, an unrelated female, which arrived in Singapore together with Roni. The conditioning process took close to three weeks, as keepers wanted to ensure the calf was accepted by the herd. All four are now comfortably sharing the exhibit and can regularly be seen grooming each other to strengthen their bonds.

Aside from the mother’s milk, the calf can now be seen nibbling on leaves and chopped vegetables such as carrots. He now spends his days exploring and running around in the exhibit at the Zoo’s Wild Africa zone. While he’s starting to get used to passing trams and visitors, he will still race back to the safety of mom’s towering presence when faced with something unfamiliar.

Roni the giraffe bonds with her new male calf, born on 31 August this year. The baby, the first in 28 years, is the tallest SG50 Jubilee baby and can now be seen with the rest of the giraffe herd in Singapore Zoo’s Wild Africa zone. PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Roni the giraffe bonds with her new male calf, born on 31 August this year. The baby, the first in 28 years, is the tallest SG50 Jubilee baby and can now be seen with the rest of the giraffe herd in Singapore Zoo’s Wild Africa zone.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

“Animal babies are always a cause for celebration as they are a good indication that the animals under our care feel comfortable and secure enough to breed in the environment that we’ve created for them. We hope the calf will tug at visitors’ heartstrings and inspire them to find out more about giraffes, and other animals that thrive in the same environment as these majestic creatures,” said Dr Cheng Wen-Haur, Chief Life Sciences Officer, Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

Although listed as least concern on the IUCN* Red List of Threatened Species, habitat destruction and fragmentation are threats to giraffe populations. To a lesser degree, they are hunted for their meat, coat and tails. The tail is prized for good luck bracelets, fly whisks and string for sewing beads, while the coat is used for shield coverings.

The baby giraffe is adopted by GROW growing-up milk from Abbott Laboratories (Singapore) Pte Ltd. There are plans to conduct a naming contest to find a suitable name for the little one in coming months.

Those visiting Singapore Zoo are encouraged to take photos of the new addition and upload them with the hashtag #sg50babygiraffe. Visitors can follow updates on the baby giraffe’s development at www.zoo.com.sg/sg50babygiraffe.

*IUCN: International Union for the Conservation of Nature

FURRIEST AUSTRALIAN TOURISTS PICK SINGAPORE NAMES AHEAD OF SG50

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Koalas Chan, Idalia, Paddle and Pellita choose their Singapore names in time for Golden Jubilee weekend

Singapore, 5 August 2015 – Meet Cantik, Sayang, Nila, and Manja, otherwise known as Chan, Idalia, Paddle and Pellita. Seeking to blend in fully with locals, the koala quartet from Down Under gave their paw of approval and picked their Singapore names in a simple ceremony at Singapore Zoo just days before the nation celebrates her 50th anniversary of independence.

Over 250 suggestions were crowd sourced through a koala nicknaming campaign last month, and eight of the most suitable names were shortlisted. It was then left to the four ladies to pick the one they liked.

The marsupials have become hot favourites with park visitors since their arrival on 13 April this year. The koalas are a gift from Australia to Singapore on the occasion of Singapore’s 50th anniversary of independence, and the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Australia and Singapore.

Chan has chosen Cantik, which means beautiful in Malay and is similar to her original name. This lovely lady with the pink nose is a beauty in her own right. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Chan has chosen Cantik, which means beautiful in Malay and is similar to her original name. This lovely lady with the pink nose is a beauty in her own right. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Singapore Zoo’s littlest koala Idalia has decided she’d like to be called Sayang, which means love in Malay, and is often used as a term of endearment for a loved one. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Singapore Zoo’s littlest koala Idalia has decided she’d like to be called Sayang, which means love in Malay, and is often used as a term of endearment for a loved one. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE

Pellita’s choice of a local nickname is Manja, which means affectionate in Malay. Quite an appropriate name for someone who always nuzzles up to her keepers (especially during feeding time!). PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Pellita’s choice of a local nickname is Manja, which means affectionate in Malay. Quite an appropriate name for someone who always nuzzles up to her keepers (especially during feeding time!). PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Being the oldest koala in the group in Singapore Zoo, Paddle has decided to go historical and chose Nila as her nickname. Sang Nila Utama was thought to be the founder of the Kingdom of Singapura in 1299. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

Being the oldest koala in the group in Singapore Zoo, Paddle has decided to go historical and chose Nila as her nickname. Sang Nila Utama was thought to be the founder of the Kingdom of Singapura in 1299. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The koalas, together with the rest of the animal and keeper family at Wildlife Reserves Singapore, wish Singapore a Happy 50th Birthday. Majulah Singapura! Click here or on the image below to view a wildly special birthday video:

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

The rarest, most adorable, and stunning residents of Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo got together to extend the wildest birthday greeting in celebration of Singapore’s 50th birthday. These included orang utans, a falabella, and a Malay fish owl native to the island. PHOTO CREDITS: WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE.

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